Does Diabetes Cause Bad Breath Dogs

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What do give my little dog for bad breath?
    I have a little dog I just got and her breath is horrible and she has very few teeth. What is something soft that she could chew that might help with this problem?
    I found her in a parking lot and could not let her continue to live there so I grabed her and took her home. No one has claimed her. So I have no idea how old she is or anything.

    • ANSWER:
      when was the last time she had a dental from the vet? There are a lot of different things you can try, although brushing the dogs teeth help the most, I am assuming this is an older dog, sometimes bad breath is caused by kidney failure (http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2114&aid=350) and diabetes (http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1+1328&aid=196) and periodontal disease http://www.dentalvet.com/vets/periodontics/periodontal_disease.htm
      EDIT: A vet will also be able to tell you how old she is, and scan her for a microchip, either way it sounds like she should go in to get checked over to make sure she is in good overall health.

  2. QUESTION:
    What can food is good for a dog with cancer or diabetes. I am looking at Evo or Core Wellness.?
    I am looking at Evo or Wellness Core because they are grain free which means less carbs. I understand less carbs is best for Diabetes. Is Evo or Wellness Core OK to give on a regular basis as their main diet? I am thinking that Wellness Core may be easier to digest but is this true. With a dog that has cancer or diabetes which do you recommend and is there another one you would prefer?

    • ANSWER:
      Cancer in dogs is more common that many people would trend to believe. Studies indicate that that approximately 25% of dogs will contract cancer at some time in their life and that almost 50% of all dogs older than the age of ten years will die of cancer

      If your dog contracts cancer, the affected areas can include but are not limited to the skin, organs, bone and organs. Cancer in your dog may progress gradually or with rapidity.

      The good news is that treatments exist for cancer in dogs . While canine cancer can be fatal it is not necessarily a death sentence. The first thing you must do is determine if in fact your dog does have cancer.

      There are ten common symptoms of cancer in dogs, taken primarily from the American Veterinary Medical Association, these are:

      • Unusual swelling that either remains or grows

      • Sores which will not heal

      • A loss of weight in your dog

      • Discharge or bleeding from an opening on your dog’s body

      • Bad breath or offensive odor that emits from your dog

      • Trouble eating food or swallowing

      • A loss of interest in exercise or a loss of stamina

      • Lameness in your dog or evidence of stiffness

      • Trouble with urination, defecating or breathing

      If you detect any of these symptoms in your dog. Don’t panic. Taken individually, theses canine symptoms may be indicative of something that is not cancer and may not be serious at all. Make an appointment with your veterinarian for an exam for your dog. If cancer is the problem, he will help you develop a treatment plan. If canine cancer is not the cause, your vet may prescribe a remedy to alleviate and heal the condition.

      Cause of Cancer in Dogs

      There are various causes of cancer in dogs. The National Canine Cancer Foundation says that cancer can be attributed to factors such as excessive exposure to carcinogenic agents which include chemicals.

      We believe that this should be a cause of concern for any dog parent who regularly feeds commercial dog food to their dog as carcinogens have been discovered to exist in some popular dog food brands. You can find out what is in the dog food you use at http://www.dogs-4life.com/dog-food-that-kills.html
      Other causes of canine cancer include viral infections and UV or X irradiation.

      What is the Best Cancer Treatment for My Dog?

      Because there are different types of cancers, there are different treatments prescribed be veterinary oncologists. The success of treating cancer in your dog hinges on a number of factors. Some of those factors are early detection and diagnoses of the cancer by your veterinarian, and the specific treatment recommended and used in your dog’s battle against canine cancer.

      Early detection may include your vet doing a biopsy, some X-rays and consulting with an expert in canine radiology to review the results. If cancer is diagnosed, your vet may recommend surgery or refer you to a canine oncologist.

      Your best chances for success often depend upon early diagnosis of canine cancer. This is true because in early stages of cancer in dogs there is less likelihood of the cancer having spread to a point where treatment becomes unproductive.

      Once an early diagnosis of canine cancer has been confirmed, your veterinary oncologist may suggest a variety of treatment options such as drugs, surgery and/or radiation.

      If your dog has been generally healthy, she deserves a chance to live the balance of her life feeling as well as possible for as long a time as possible. If you can extend the life of your 13 year old terrier by a few years, and provide a good quality of life to your dog as a result of canine cancer treatment, your persistence in helping your dog will have been rewarded.

  3. QUESTION:
    What's the best cat food for a kitty with bad dental issues? His breath is stankin!?
    We just adopted a 8 year old male kitty from a shelter and the only health issue is that he has a lot of tartar on his teeth. We will have to schedule a vet appointment to get that taken care of but in the meantime his breath is so smelly - poor little guy! Poor US! He loves to lick! We don't want to give him anything too crunchy because we think he recently lost a tooth and his mouth is sensitive (he swallows his food whole).

    • ANSWER:
      Floss with an ox. The next time you make oxtail soup, give your pet the cooked oxtail. Dr. Dorn says the tail's tendons and fibers help massage the teeth and gums and may help clean those hard-to-reach places.

      Quell it with carrots. A little bit of raw carrot, given as a midday treat, can act as a mild-mannered tooth scraper, scouring away stink-causing plaque, says Cheryl Schwartz, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Oakland, California.

      Reach for a spray. There are mouth sprays for dogs and cats, which do the same thing as the minty sprays people use. "They're purely cosmetic," says Dr. Shipp. But cosmetic isn't such a bad thing when your pet's breath is petrifying.

      Can the canned food. "Switching to dry food may help to improve mouth odor, because it scrapes the surface of the teeth," says Lisa Freeman, D.V.M., clinical instructor and a fellow in clinical nutrition at the Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine in North Grafton, Massachusetts.

      Nix nibbling. If you allow your pet to munch on her food throughout the day, the harmful bacteria in her mouth are always active, says Dr. Dorn. He advises picking up your pet's food bowl if she doesn't finish her meal within 30 minutes to an hour. "If you only feed a dog once or twice a day, you only feed the bacteria once or twice a day," Dr. Dorn says.

      Rice to the occasion. Whole grains, like cooked brown rice, can help food move along the digestive tract more readily, says Dr. Schwartz. "Better digestion can play a role in better breath," she says. She recommends replacing a small portion of your pet's regular food with rice at every meal.

      Scrap the scraps. Breath often reflects the diet, and if you're feeding your dog or cat things like leftover spaghetti flavored with lots of garlic, you may have found the cause of her bad breath.

      Go for the green. Chlorophyll tablets can aid digestion and sweeten your pet's breath, says Dr. Schwartz.

      Or blast it with black. The next time you're choosing biscuits for your pet, opt for the black variety. They may not be as pretty as the pinks or golds, but they usually have one thing the others don't -- a dash of charcoal. Charcoal is a binding agent that can absorb bad odors. But don't go overboard, since charcoal can also bind up essential nutrients. Limit treats to one or two a day, vets advise.

      Suspicious Odors
      Just as the eyes are windows to the soul, the mouth is a window to your pet's health. While a little stinky breath usually isn't cause for alarm, there are a few serious conditions that can cause distinct mouth odors, says Albert S. Dorn, D.V.M., professor of surgery at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine in Knoxville. In fact, your vet can often make a preliminary diagnosis based on your pet's breath. Here are some examples.

      A sweet, fruity scent could indicate diabetes, especially if your pet is drinking or urinating more than usual and is losing weight. A urine-like smell might mean kidney disease, particularly if it's accompanied by increased thirst and urination and decreased appetite. A mouth odor that vets simply describe as foul, when accompanied by vomiting, loss of appetite, swelling of the abdomen or yellowing of the eyes or gums, could indicate a liver disorder.

      Good luck!

  4. QUESTION:
    I rescued a dog and its breath smells like an opened grave what can I do?
    I brushed his teeth and gave him a mint to eat but every time the lil' feller yawns it stinks up the room.

    • ANSWER:
      Take him to the vet first to get his teeth checked out for cavities/decay and possibly cleaned, and also to rule out any health problems, as some can cause bad breath (diabetes and kidney disease can cause animals to have bad breath, as do many other diseases).
      If he's got a clean bill of health, you should probably try swapping his food (include some garlic-I know it gives people bad breath, but it can keep dog's breath smelling fresher and it's good for them all around), giving him some doggy anti-bad breath treats such as Greenies, and by starting a routine to keep his teeth brushed.
      Best wishes, and I hope his breath becomes bearable soon!

  5. QUESTION:
    Why is my puppies breath so bad?
    I have a 7 week old black lab, I have had her almost a week now. Her breath is so bad I dont know if something is wrong with her or what. I know this is not puppy breath it smells like she has eaten a skunk or something. Also when we take her outside she seems to chew on grass.I have givin her dog bones that help with bad dog breath as well as toys and they dont do a thing for it. Please someone help me. This is horriable.

    • ANSWER:
      Most of us have smelled dog halitosis (bad breath) at one time or another. It is the result of the foul odor-producing bacteria buildup in a dog’s lungs, gut, or mouth. Chronic halitosis in a dog can indicate that it needs better dental care or there is a serious issue in its gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or liver.

      Dog Breath Causes

      The more common serious issues are gum (periodontal) or dental disease, and generally the smaller a dog is, the more vulnerable it is to tartar and plague. There are more serious issues that are possible, but less common, which include more extreme medical problems in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, organs, or respiratory system.

      Diagnosing Dog Breath

      One should normally bring his or her pet to the veterinarian to diagnose the reason behind the chronic bad breath. A vet can do a physical eam and laboratory work to pinpoint the problem. Come prepared with information on your dog’s diet, exercise routine, and behavioral habits.

      When Should I Take My Dog To The Vet?

      As soon as your dog’s breath has an unusual smell, bring it to the vet. Here are some symptoms:

      1. Unusually fruity/sweet breath can signify diabetes, especially if the dog has been drinking fluids and urinating more than usual.
      2. Dog breath that smells like urine can mean kidney disease.
      3. Bad breath along with vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas and/or gums can signify a liver problem.

      Dog Breath Cure

      Obviously, treatment depends on the cause of dog breath. If plaque is the cause, the dog may need a professional dental cleaning. If diet is the cause, then you should change what your dog is eating. If the cause of bad breath is related to gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, or lung issues, the vet should know the best route to take.

      Prevent Dog Breath

      Just because a dog is older does not mean that it is normal to have bad breath. Always take action and provide the best care that you can for your pet, as a method of prevention. Here are some good things to do:

      1. Bring the dog in for regular checkups at the vet to make sure it has no underlying medical issues.
      2. Have the vet monitor the condition of the dog’s teeth and breath.
      3. Provide the dog with a high-quality and easily digestible diet.
      4. Brush the dog’s teeth everyday if possible–or as frequently as you can if you cannot everyday. Be sure to brush with a toothpaste made for dog’s, since toothpaste for human’s can cause digestive problems in canines.
      5. Provide safe chew toys that encourage the natural process of chewing and teeth cleaning.
      6. Research dog treats that help with breath odor.
      7. Research dog oral health products to use at home and discuss them with your vet.

      Keep in mind that products designed to mask bad breath may not fix the cause of it. Also, most of these ideas discussed can also be used for cats.

  6. QUESTION:
    How long will my parents miniature schnauzer live?
    The dog is 5 yeas old but weighs 35 pounds it eats only human food it breaths heavy all the time and has problems going poo. will it die earlier and how early? i want my parents to know how bad it is

    • ANSWER:
      Being overweight will definitely shorten their life span. Not only affecting all the internal organs like putting too much pressure on her heart, it will cause her rear kneecaps to slip. It puts her a high risk for diabetes & other thyroid conditions. Every 5lb on a dog that size is the same as a average size woman putting on 70lb. So their dog is minimum of 10lb overweight is the same as me (114lb) putting on an extra 140lb - more than double my weight now. If they don't start now in feeding her a good quality dog food & exercising & loosing the weight , they will do good to have her another 5 yr instead of 10yr.

  7. QUESTION:
    My cat pants like a dog, and has really bad breath?
    Ok, my cat is really just a kitten, (born April 2nd) and when he plays energetically he pants like a dog with his tongue sticking out. I've never seen a cat do that before. Also, he has absolutely horrid breath. Anybody have any idea if I should be concerned about these things? I can't afford to bring him to the vet just to find out he's normal.

    • ANSWER:
      Some cats do pant after a lot of activity. We have a one year old who does so and since it seemed to happen so quickly, we took her to the vet just to make sure there were no problems. The vet took a couple of x-rays and everything looked fine.

      Your cat may simply be panting because he is so active.

      As to bad breath, that is usually a symptom of dental problems but that is unusual in a kitten as young as yours.

      A strange smell to a cat's breath can be a symptom of some diseases. One is untreated diabetes. An untreated, or under treated, diabetic cat will develop what is called Diabetic KetoAcidosis (DKA).

      This occurs because the body does not have enough insulin to process the glucose in the food, or glucose made from other substances in the food. The body switches over to breaking up fatty tissue to produce substances that the body cells can use as "fuel", in place of the glucose that cannot be used due to insufficient insulin.

      Some of substances created when fatty tissue is broken down are called Ketone Bodies.

      One type of ketone body created is acetone - the stuff used in fingernail polish remover.

      It is very volatile and if there is a large amount of it in the blood stream, as there would be for a diabetic in DKA, some of it passes into the lungs and is exhaled.

      If you cat's breath smells like acetone, it could be diabetic.

      But - it is pretty much unheard of for a kitten just a few months old to develop diabetes.

      There are other diseases which can produce unusual odors on a cat's breath.

      I'd check the kittens teeth and gums to see if there is any redness, swelling, discolored teeth, broken teeth, or even teeth setting at odd angles. These can be caused by dental or gum problems.

      If the bad breath continues and you can't explain it, it might be wise to have a vet check the kitten over.

      As to the cost of a vet visit - a basic vet office visit exam should cost between and dollars. That is not much for the type of exam it will buy you.

      The vet should do a full exam of the cat, nose to tail, and look at any specific problems.

      You can tell the vet not do anything that will add to the bill without your prior approval.

      Do a Google search on :
      "low cost" vet cats city state

      Put the words low cost in double quotes as I show them and replace city and state with your city and state.

      You may find some low cost vets in your area.

      Check with the Humane Society, the ASPCA (RSPCA if you are in the UK), and the APA (Animal Protective Association) and see what they charge for a basic exam.

      There is a charitable vet service in the UK called PDSA, here is their eligibility page http://www.pdsa.org.uk/eligibility.html

  8. QUESTION:
    What if i gave my dog toothpaste?
    my dogs breath is horrible.........what if i gave her a small amount of tooth paste? Shes a Small toy poodle dog weighs like 10 lbs and is 13 years old....would it hurt to give her a very small amount?

    • ANSWER:
      See the vet. Toothpaste can cause intestinal upset and is bad for dogs. There is doggie toothpaste you can use. BUT, your dog probably needs a dental. Bad breath can indicate not only bad teeth, but other medical issues (heart, kidney, diabetes) and she should have a full exam to rule any medical conditions out.

      So, no, do not give your dog toothpaste.

  9. QUESTION:
    Why does my body odor smell like cellery?
    Yesterday I forgot deoderant and my body odor smelt like cellery. It was a weird smell not like normal body odor. Does anyone know why it would smell like this? And to avoid the obvious answers NO i do not eat a lot of cellery. I've actually never eaten it my entire life.

    • ANSWER:
      BEST ANSWER PLEASE!!!
      What you exhale through your breath and your skin is a good indicator of what's going on inside your body. If you start to stink within hours of not using deodorant, rest assured there is putrefaction or fermentation going on inside your body, and that indicates a poor diet, usually.
      Did you know that dogs can smell cancer on your breath? This has been verified by scientists. With special training, these dogs can actually smell cancer. They can also be trained to smell bladder cancer in your urine. Search Google for "dog sniffing bladder cancer" if you don't believe me.

      If dogs can smell cancer, it's not unreasonable that some people might be able to detect it as well. Some holistic health practitioners that I know tell me that they can smell cancer in patients. That's because cancer emits a specific odor, and a lot of people who are using deodorant are simply trying to cover up odors that could actually serve as a health indicator.

      Most Americans can't imagine going through a day without using deodorant. That's because they stink so bad that they feel obligated to apply toxic deodorant products to their bodies every single day. I used to be one of those people, but I have since learned that the things that make you stink are the same things that make you unhealthy, namely, milk, cheese, meat, animal fats and refined carbohydrate products like white flour. Animal products are the most offensive dietary sources of internal stink by far, and milk products produce the greatest funk of all.

      The more animal products you consume, the more toxic fumes you're going to emit from your armpits (and other regions). Most people believe a lot of misinformation about body odor; they think the body just naturally stinks and that body odor is just a result of bacteria growth in your armpits. This is utterly false. The body doesn't just naturally stink.

      The fact is, body odor is primarily the toxic gas from the fermentation or putrefaction processes going on inside your body due to the ingestion of animal products and processed, refined foods. Yes, there are bacteria in your armpits, but the kinds of bacteria that are living there depend on what you are "feeding" them. In other words, if your body is emitting nontoxic waste products, it's just perspiring excess minerals and normal healthy metabolic byproducts. That means the bacteria living in your armpits are not going to be as offensive as the ones that might be living there if your skin is emitting toxic byproducts of animal product digestion.

      I encourage you to take the 48-hour no-deodorant test, because it really will tell you something about your internal health. If you find that, during the 48 hours, you can't stand being around yourself because of your own body odor, then that's a strong indicator that it's time to start changing what you eat.

      Americans love to cover up symptoms rather than address their root cause. We like shortcuts, and it's a lot easier and quicker to apply a paste of aluminum salts to our armpits than actually clean up our metabolic processes. Americans are typically very hesitant to make lifestyle changes that require giving up their favorite foods, which might be chicken fried steak, a milkshake or a grilled cheese sandwich. Americans don't want to give that up and, as a result, they are dying from completely preventable metabolic diseases with names like breast cancer, diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis.

      Detecting the presence of these diseases is easier than you might think. You don't need thousands of dollars in laboratory tests to know that something is wrong (although lab tests can certainly be handy in confirming their presence). All you have to do is to assess your own smell. If your body stinks, that's a sure sign that there is something rancid going on inside, and disease processes are inevitably underway. Think about it: If you small that bad on the outside, imagine what's going on inside!

      You know who has the cleanest bodies of all? Raw food vegans. Clean bodies, clear heads, open channels. Check out folks like Dr. Gabriel Cousens at the Tree of Life Rejuvenation Center if you want to learn how to revolutionize your body, mind and spirit by starting with healthful food choice.

      Your body's metabolic engine
      Your body is a metabolic engine, and the exhaust of the engine is determined by what you are feeding the engine. You know how it's difficult to breathe if you're driving behind a diesel truck? The diesel exhaust is the result of the dirty fuels. In the body of a person who eats dirty food fuels (like animal products), there is similarly a horrible exhaust emitted from many different exhaust locations, including the tailpipe. What you emit is a very good indicator of your overall level of health.
      If you do change your foods and clean up your food fuels, you could potentially save yourself from many different degenerative diseases. Just as importantly, you'll avoid using the toxic ingredients found in deodorant products, many of which contain cancer-causing and liver-damaging chemicals. There is no requirement that chemicals used in deodorant products have to be proven safe for humans, by the way.

      In terms of nutritional supplements, the best "cleaning" supplements that can reduce your body odor are chlorella and parsley. The culinary spice cilantro also does a great job. Chlorophyll works wonders for cleaning your blood of toxins. But none of these can completely counteract the metabolic byproducts of consuming animal products.

      I've even found that whey protein, including the clean, organic whey proteins, still result in "dirty" metabolic processes that produce odor. Brown rice protein, however, is clean. (I recommend the Nutribiotic brand.) Other strategies for cleaning out your system including buying a Vitamix and blending up a fresh raw foods shake each morning. Be sure to use greens such as celery and cucumber, along with various fruits or superfood powders.

      And above all, if you want to eliminate body odor for life, avoid cheese, milk and dairy products. They make you smell like "milk and butter." The smell of these products is so bad that when U.S. soldiers were shipped off to Vietnam in the 1960's, the Vietcong could actually smell them thanks to their American diets. New arrivals were often put on new diets based on local cuisine simply to rid their bodies of the milk-and-butter smell, thereby reducing the risk of being literally sniffed out by the enemy.

      The Vietcong knew what few Americans will admit: We stink of dairy products. And then we buy toxic chemicals to cover up the smell, then douse on more perfume or cologne to create the illusion that we're actually clean-smelling folks. But remember: Unless you eat a healthy diet, you're only one shower away from being intolerable

  10. QUESTION:
    Why is my dog throwing up bile?
    I adopted a 9 month old chihuahua that was a breeder return just over a year ago. When I first got her she had chronic burping, bad breath, and vomited bile. I took her to the vet where she was treated for a stomach infection. This pepped her right back up, and she was doing just awesome.

    I thought all was well until a couple of weeks ago when she started vomiting bile again, refused to drink, refused to eat. Blood panel showed one of her liver enzymes were slightly elevated. She was given fluids at the vet, plus two anti nausea shots, checked for worms, urine analysis, and pancreatitis test. She doesn't have worms, her urine showed she was dehydrated (hence the fluids) and her pancreas is fine.

    The conclusion? We've no idea what's causing it. She's now eating nothing but turkey and sweet potato for the next 8 weeks in case its a food intolerance..and she just vomited bile again. -.-

    I'm so tired of my dog being sick! I've paid the moon for all these tests, and I'll continue to pay, but does anyone have any suggestions on what else they could possibly test for? I just want her better. :(

    • ANSWER:
      Chihuahua's are prone to blood sugar problems and even diabetes. I would check for that. Especially since her liver enzymes are high. That's how they tested me for diabetes.

  11. QUESTION:
    why does my puppy have such bad breath?
    she only 6 month old but i have given her table treats, some meat etc..can this cause bad breath from stomach

    • ANSWER:
      Most of us have smelled dog halitosis (bad breath) at one time or another. It is the result of the foul odor-producing bacteria buildup in a dog’s lungs, gut, or mouth. Chronic halitosis in a dog can indicate that it needs better dental care or there is a serious issue in its gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or liver.

      Dog Breath Causes

      The more common serious issues are gum (periodontal) or dental disease, and generally the smaller a dog is, the more vulnerable it is to tartar and plague. There are more serious issues that are possible, but less common, which include more extreme medical problems in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, organs, or respiratory system.

      Diagnosing Dog Breath

      One should normally bring his or her pet to the veterinarian to diagnose the reason behind the chronic bad breath. A vet can do a physical eam and laboratory work to pinpoint the problem. Come prepared with information on your dog’s diet, exercise routine, and behavioral habits.

      When Should I Take My Dog To The Vet?

      As soon as your dog’s breath has an unusual smell, bring it to the vet. Here are some symptoms:

      1. Unusually fruity/sweet breath can signify diabetes, especially if the dog has been drinking fluids and urinating more than usual.
      2. Dog breath that smells like urine can mean kidney disease.
      3. Bad breath along with vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas and/or gums can signify a liver problem.

      Dog Breath Cure

      Obviously, treatment depends on the cause of dog breath. If plaque is the cause, the dog may need a professional dental cleaning. If diet is the cause, then you should change what your dog is eating. If the cause of bad breath is related to gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, or lung issues, the vet should know the best route to take.

      Prevent Dog Breath

      Just because a dog is older does not mean that it is normal to have bad breath. Always take action and provide the best care that you can for your pet, as a method of prevention. Here are some good things to do:

      1. Bring the dog in for regular checkups at the vet to make sure it has no underlying medical issues.
      2. Have the vet monitor the condition of the dog’s teeth and breath.
      3. Provide the dog with a high-quality and easily digestible diet.
      4. Brush the dog’s teeth everyday if possible–or as frequently as you can if you cannot everyday. Be sure to brush with a toothpaste made for dog’s, since toothpaste for human’s can cause digestive problems in canines.
      5. Provide safe chew toys that encourage the natural process of chewing and teeth cleaning.
      6. Research dog treats that help with breath odor.
      7. Research dog oral health products to use at home and discuss them with your vet.

      Keep in mind that products designed to mask bad breath may not fix the cause of it. Also, most of these ideas discussed can also be used for cats.

  12. QUESTION:
    how do i get rid of my dog's strong oddor?
    we bath him as often as possible ,but even right after bath he still smells dirty

    • ANSWER:
      The first question a vet will have is this -- what is causing the odor? There are a multitude of shampoos out there, but if it isn't a skin or coat problem, shampoo won't help.

      The first thing to consider is the obvious -- did your dog roll in something (decaying matter, feces) or get sprayed by a skunk? Usually either one of these scenarios is fairly easy to diagnose, and your vet can offer advice on what shampoo would be the best for either situation.

      Dog didn't roll in anything/get sprayed?
      Here are just a few possible smell-producing medical problems:

      Breath - some diseases, like kidney failure and Diabetes, can cause a change in breath.
      Diseased teeth and gums - dental disease and infected gums can produce a very foul odor. Additionally, a sore mouth may cause increased drooling. The malodorous saliva can coat the fur, furniture, etc., and you may not recognize that this is originating in the mouth.
      Infected ears - bacterially infected ears are often extremely smelling. A vet can usually smell these ones while they are still in the waiting room. Your dog will usually be scratching or shaking the head, but not always. A bath may make ears worse if water is trapped in the ear canal.
      Flatulence - is the odor on your dog, or from your dog? Flatulence, or "gas" may indicate a dietary or intestinal problem. Some flatulence is normal, but if this is regularly occurring, please see your veterinarian.
      Anal glands/sacs - this is perhaps the most common cause of doggie odor that won't go away. Anal sacs are two small scent-sacs in the area of the anus. These are a type of "marking" glands. When a dog has a bowel movement, these sacs are normally squeeze, and a very smelly, oily secretion is released with the feces.
      If these sacs become infected or impacted (thicker secretion than normal, can't empty properly), problems result. This can be a very painful situation when they become infected! If a dog (or cat) is scared or overly excited, these glands can secrete the smelly, oily substance on the surrounding fur, causing bad odor.

  13. QUESTION:
    my dog's breath smells like ass. do they have doggy mints or could this be a medical problem?
    My dog is 5 and weighs about 8 pounds (bichon/ small breed) but has the worst breath any suggestions???

    • ANSWER:
      He could have halitosis form needing his teeth cleaned, this is very common in small breed dogs. Diabetes will cause bad breath (I'm not saying your dog has that problem at all, other symptoms would be involved, i.e. excessive water intake ETC...). If you have a cat or there are cats in the neighborhood he could be sampling the "kitty roca", they love cat poo!

  14. QUESTION:
    Can puppies eat cooked red meat?
    I heard that the loose hair is it true?

    • ANSWER:
      Dogs are designed to eat carcasses and this, of course, means meat, meaty bones, organs etc . All mine eat plenty of RAW red meat and chicken and fish .... and I start them on this at about 4 weeks of age.

      A diet of JUST meat (cooked or raw) will not provide the nutrients that a dog needs - feed meaty bones and organs too! A diet deficient in nutrients will cause hair loss, growth issues, joint problems, diabetes (2), skin problems, bad breath ........

      Many people feed a more natural diet of raw meat, meaty bones and organs rather than processed commercial foods. I've put some links below to show you why. The myths link is really good for putting a lot of those rumours and old wives' tales to rest.

      "Dogs are Carnivores" An article clearly explaining the physiological reasons behind this classification and the effects of feeding inappropriate foods
      http://www.thewholedog.org/artcarnivores…
      A feeding guide published by Dr Tom Lonsdale, a vet who advocates raw feeding and has been widely published
      http://www.rawmeatybones.com/diet/exp-di…
      A website debunking some of the many myths regarding raw feeding and bones.
      http://rawfed.com/myths

  15. QUESTION:
    why does my dog drink so much?
    I have an 8 mos. old male rough collie. In the past couple months I noticed he's been drinking more & more from his water bowl. Lately he's been drinking almost the entire bowl in one shot even without good reason for being thirsty, such as after running or playing around. What could be wrong with him?

    • ANSWER:
      Have you changed the food? If not, then it is probably a health problem. (Kibble foods vs raw or home cooked diets have a great deal of salt in them & dogs eating dry kibble often consume vast amounts of water, as salt is also a cheap flavor enhancer. However, this is higher than normal water consumption. Do you have any other symptoms? Loss or gaining of weight? lethargy?

      It could be kidney failure. Symptoms of Kidney Failure in Dogs

      Early clinical signs of kidney failure in dogs

      •increased water consumption
      •increased urine production.
      Clinical signs of more advanced kidney failure in dogs

      •loss of appetite
      •depression
      •vomiting
      •diarrhea
      •very bad breath
      •ulcers in the mouth.

      It could be Diabetes or it could be Cushings disease, among other things, or consumption of rat poison. Is your dog on prednisone? (It also causes greater thirst than normal.) Please take your dog to the vet & have it checked for anything the vet thinks might cause thirst, if none of the other things such as medication or a change in food, are relevant.

  16. QUESTION:
    Hi I have a 6 year old female collie. I need help to give her better breath.?
    I have try new dog treats new dog food and I even brushed her teeth which she did not like. Can someone please help me???

    • ANSWER:
      In order to get her a fresh start, take her to your vet and have her teeth professionally cleaned. The vet can tell you if there is a problem (bad tooth, gum problems, etc.) that can be causing the bad breath. Also, when is the last time she had a physical? Diabetes can sometimes cause bad breath.

      She's not going to like your brushing their teeth at first, but it's something you should keep doing and eventually she'll get used to it. Try using a washcloth on your finger first, then a finger brush before graduating to a regular canine toothbrush.

      I don't know much about it, but I understand there is a new vaccine available for dogs to help prevent periodontal disease. It's manufactured by Pfizer.

  17. QUESTION:
    Do you think dogs can sense illness?
    Just today, my 4 month old black lab wouldn't leave my sight. She was on my heels and right beside me all day. I wasn't feeling well, so I went to the ER this evening. As it turns out that I have mono. Do you think she could sense it and that's why she wouldn't leave my side? Just a thought.
    *turns out I have mono.

    • ANSWER:
      Yeah, I really do. I work in a hospital, I'm a paramedic, and I'm not alone in that thought. Many doctors I work with and nurses agree and have their own personal stories, as do I. There are stories out there of dogs sniffing and licking spots on their owners only to find out they had skin cancer there, or a tumor beneath there. The dogs were clearly focused on that spot and since licking is their really only method of healing their wounds, they are trying to do the same to your "wound" even though you may not know you are sick yet, they are indicating a problem spot.

      There are dogs who, of their own accord, warn owners who have Type I Diabetes (insulin dependent) when their sugar is way too high and they are about to pass out, which gives them a chance to check their sugar and administer their insulin before it happens, or with Type II, dogs who warn their owners of the same impending but oppositely caused doom, sugar is too low and they are about to go unconscious, and the owners can quickly get sugar on board to stabilize themselves. Since both of these can be easily lethal if no one finds you, these dogs are saving their owners lives. The thought is that the dogs can smell the ketones either in the owners breath, or just in their blood and body in general, or one of the other very weak odors that they can scent associated with their illness that occur right before disaster happens.

      Special projects are being developed training dogs to detect the presence of cancer inside people, and so far it's going quite well. It seems these best friends of ours with their incredibly powerful and complex olfactory senses can prove useful in more than just sniffing out lost humans, bodies, and drugs. They have practical applications in medicine and disease or illness detection, as well!

      With my own dog, (This might sound disgusting to some people, if it does, I apologize) he used to often seem VERY interested in sniffing the area of my body right at the top of my buttocks, where they connect to my back. At first I thought it was just dog butt sniffing behavior, but it wasn't lower, he was uniquely interested in this higher area. And then he had a very strong desire to lick the area, VERY strong desire, it was hard to stop him. Turns out, I developed a cyst right there a few weeks later, and now years later, I have been battling for years to kill it off for good. It gets fully inflamed and swollen, I go to my doctor, he lances it, I take antibiotics and keep it clean, and it heals slowly anyway. I wouldn't let my dog lick my open wound for the first couple years, my training in medicine told me that was a bad idea, and that I knew best how to care for it, but despite everything I would do, it would always return every few months, and it's very painful for a couple weeks every time it pops up again.

      Well, finally, both in desperation to make it heal and go away forever, and growing weary of having to constantly tell my dog to stop sniffing it and trying to lick it every time he saw an opportunity (who, if you remember, had developed an overwhelming urge to smell and lick the area, like total obsession), one day, I finally just caved and gave up and let him do what he wanted. He gently licked it for about 2 minutes, and then returned to do so every hour or so all day, and did this for a few days, and for the first time ever it healed much quicker! Based on the results, I now let him lick there whenever he wants after sniffing it and deciding if it needs licking or not, and as a result, for a couple years now, neither has it has not returned every 3 months like before, but it also has not returned at all, ever since then. I told my doctor who actually wasn't totally surprised....my dog doesn't eat animal crap or his own, or garbage, and never chews or licks on his own rear end or genitals, basically he has a pretty clean mouth, and there's always been debate over if dogs saliva has enzymes that keep their mouths super clean and actually gives their saliva healing power. Well, I'm convinced with this dog at least. I know it might sound gross, but not having to go through that pain and aggravation every few months makes it totally worth it to me as the only true cure for it no mater what I tried with medicine.

      Dogs are amazing. I'm sure she somehow knew you were sick, and she was worried about your health, and hence wouldn't leave your side. Dogs have a sixth sense type connection with us just like we sort of do with them, how we understand them when we look in their eyes. She could sense you weren't feeling yourself and it stressed her out because she's so emotionally attached to you, or could somehow smell something from the mono. What a good girl :) She loves her Mom!

  18. QUESTION:
    is there anything i can buy to get rid of my dog's bad smell?
    for example lotion, perfume, or spray. i keep him inside the house. i bath him every 3 weeks. and after a week he stars to smell. i use this shampoo " Hydrosurge oatmeal apple shampoo".

    • ANSWER:
      the smell could come from something that is medically wrong with him rather then just being dirty. you might want to have him checked by the vet for some problems you can't see.

      Here are just a few possible smell-producing medical problems:

      •Breath - some diseases, like kidney failure and Diabetes, can cause a change in breath.
      •Diseased teeth and gums - dental disease and infected gums can produce a very foul odor. Additionally, a sore mouth may cause increased drooling. The malodorous saliva can coat the fur, furniture, etc., and you may not recognize that this is originating in the mouth.
      •Infected ears - bacterially infected ears are often extremely smelling. A vet can usually smell these ones while they are still in the waiting room. Your dog will usually be scratching or shaking the head, but not always. A bath may make ears worse if water is trapped in the ear canal.
      •Flatulence - is the odor on your dog, or from your dog? Flatulence, or "gas" may indicate a dietary or intestinal problem. Some flatulence is normal, but if this is regularly occurring, please see your veterinarian.
      •Anal glands/sacs - this is perhaps the most common cause of doggie odor that won't go away. Anal sacs are two small scent-sacs in the area of the anus. These are a type of "marking" glands. When a dog has a bowel movement, these sacs are normally squeeze, and a very smelly, oily secretion is released with the feces.

  19. QUESTION:
    what causes bad dog breath?
    my dog has really bad breath like she ate a dead fish help
    i brush its teeth all the time and she has had it for 3 months

    • ANSWER:
      Most of us have smelled dog halitosis (bad breath) at one time or another. It is the result of the foul odor-producing bacteria buildup in a dog’s lungs, gut, or mouth. Chronic halitosis in a dog can indicate that it needs better dental care or there is a serious issue in its gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or liver.

      Dog Breath Causes

      The more common serious issues are gum (periodontal) or dental disease, and generally the smaller a dog is, the more vulnerable it is to tartar and plague. There are more serious issues that are possible, but less common, which include more extreme medical problems in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, organs, or respiratory system.

      Diagnosing Dog Breath

      One should normally bring his or her pet to the veterinarian to diagnose the reason behind the chronic bad breath. A vet can do a physical eam and laboratory work to pinpoint the problem. Come prepared with information on your dog’s diet, exercise routine, and behavioral habits.

      When Should I Take My Dog To The Vet?

      As soon as your dog’s breath has an unusual smell, bring it to the vet. Here are some symptoms:

      1. Unusually fruity/sweet breath can signify diabetes, especially if the dog has been drinking fluids and urinating more than usual.
      2. Dog breath that smells like urine can mean kidney disease.
      3. Bad breath along with vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas and/or gums can signify a liver problem.

      Dog Breath Cure

      Obviously, treatment depends on the cause of dog breath. If plaque is the cause, the dog may need a professional dental cleaning. If diet is the cause, then you should change what your dog is eating. If the cause of bad breath is related to gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, or lung issues, the vet should know the best route to take.

      Prevent Dog Breath

      Just because a dog is older does not mean that it is normal to have bad breath. Always take action and provide the best care that you can for your pet, as a method of prevention. Here are some good things to do:

      1. Bring the dog in for regular checkups at the vet to make sure it has no underlying medical issues.
      2. Have the vet monitor the condition of the dog’s teeth and breath.
      3. Provide the dog with a high-quality and easily digestible diet.
      4. Brush the dog’s teeth everyday if possible–or as frequently as you can if you cannot everyday. Be sure to brush with a toothpaste made for dog’s, since toothpaste for human’s can cause digestive problems in canines.
      5. Provide safe chew toys that encourage the natural process of chewing and teeth cleaning.
      6. Research dog treats that help with breath odor.
      7. Research dog oral health products to use at home and discuss them with your vet.

      Keep in mind that products designed to mask bad breath may not fix the cause of it. Also, most of these ideas discussed can also be used for cats.

  20. QUESTION:
    My friend's dog a German shepard mix, has bad breath! Help! She's taken him to the vet, given denta bones,
    breath pills, anything you can think of, she's tried, what should she do!??!???

    For my dogs, I brush their teeth, regular check ups, denta bones, etc, but it doesn't work for her dog!

    • ANSWER:
      Bad Breath can be indicative of many illnesses such as:
      * Diabetes- breath unpleasantly sweet.
      * kidney disease-breath with an ammonia-like smell.
      * An intestinal blockage can make the breath smell like stool.

      It could also just be that he is licking something gross around the house, or getting into the cat litter or something.

      Changing to better dog food will also help some dogs just smell better in general. I got food once for my dog that caused him to smell more intensly like a wet dog.

      Check out those things, and if you can't identify a outside cause, go to the vet.

  21. QUESTION:
    what is wrong with those people whose breath smells like fart?

    • ANSWER:
      Possible causes of bad breath are coffee, garlic and onion consumption, smoking, cavities, gum decay and ketonemia. My late dog had diabetes and his smell was like a bucketful of fish entrails under the sun in July.
      In other cases it is idiopathic. I had a healthy and clean coworker whose breath was an unbelievable thing.

  22. QUESTION:
    My dog has bad breath, like...REALLY bad breath. Anyone have a remedy for it?
    We used to think it was his ears, as he has chronic ear infections. Then my mom realized that we had cleaned his ears the other day, so it couldn't be it. She bent down near him and smelled him, then smelled his mouth...and ran. There's something wrong with him and we don't know what, anyone have any advice and/or remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      Most of us have smelled dog halitosis (bad breath) at one time or another. It is the result of the foul odor-producing bacteria buildup in a dog’s lungs, gut, or mouth. Chronic halitosis in a dog can indicate that it needs better dental care or there is a serious issue in its gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or liver.

      Dog Breath Causes

      The more common serious issues are gum (periodontal) or dental disease, and generally the smaller a dog is, the more vulnerable it is to tartar and plague. There are more serious issues that are possible, but less common, which include more extreme medical problems in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, organs, or respiratory system.

      Diagnosing Dog Breath

      One should normally bring his or her pet to the veterinarian to diagnose the reason behind the chronic bad breath. A vet can do a physical eam and laboratory work to pinpoint the problem. Come prepared with information on your dog’s diet, exercise routine, and behavioral habits.

      When Should I Take My Dog To The Vet?

      As soon as your dog’s breath has an unusual smell, bring it to the vet. Here are some symptoms:

      1. Unusually fruity/sweet breath can signify diabetes, especially if the dog has been drinking fluids and urinating more than usual.
      2. Dog breath that smells like urine can mean kidney disease.
      3. Bad breath along with vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas and/or gums can signify a liver problem.

      Dog Breath Cure

      Obviously, treatment depends on the cause of dog breath. If plaque is the cause, the dog may need a professional dental cleaning. If diet is the cause, then you should change what your dog is eating. If the cause of bad breath is related to gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, or lung issues, the vet should know the best route to take.

      Prevent Dog Breath

      Just because a dog is older does not mean that it is normal to have bad breath. Always take action and provide the best care that you can for your pet, as a method of prevention. Here are some good things to do:

      1. Bring the dog in for regular checkups at the vet to make sure it has no underlying medical issues.
      2. Have the vet monitor the condition of the dog’s teeth and breath.
      3. Provide the dog with a high-quality and easily digestible diet.
      4. Brush the dog’s teeth everyday if possible–or as frequently as you can if you cannot everyday. Be sure to brush with a toothpaste made for dog’s, since toothpaste for human’s can cause digestive problems in canines.
      5. Provide safe chew toys that encourage the natural process of chewing and teeth cleaning.
      6. Research dog treats that help with breath odor.
      7. Research dog oral health products to use at home and discuss them with your vet.

      Keep in mind that products designed to mask bad breath may not fix the cause of it. Also, most of these ideas discussed can also be used for cats.

  23. QUESTION:
    my cats breath smells bad?
    he is a 1 year old colorpoint and his breath smells like fish with armpit.So now when he licks your hand you have to take a shower.We feed him dry cat food the brand is Friskies.Just help I am tired of my cats bad breath!

    • ANSWER:
      You should take a look at his gums. are they too pale or red? That would be a bad sign. You should go to the vet anyways, it's not natural.

      You should reconsider what you're feeding. Dry food is inappropriate to feed to cats. Here's why:
      Cats evolved as desert creatures and are well adapted (still!) to survive in a dry climate, if fed their natural food. Cats are not thirst driven like dogs and are able to survive on less water than dogs. They compensate for reduced water intake by concentrating their urine. When fed a dry food diet (which has less than 10 percent moisture), unless they drink a lot of water, which most cats do not, they are in a constant state of dehydration. Moreover, although a cat consuming a dry food diet does drink more water than a cat consuming a canned food diet, in the end, when water from all sources is added together — what's in their diet plus what they drink — the cat consumes approximately HALF the amount of water compared with a cat eating canned foods.6 On a dry food diet, a cat's urine becomes overly concentrated which leads to feline lower urinary tract disease. Consumption of dry food is associated with lower urinary tract disease as is increased frequency of feeding (a.k.a "free feeding" which is how most people feed dry food), no matter what type of food is fed and obesity.

      Now Friskies is a low quality food. It contains a lot of grain and grain is high in carbs. Carbs cause diabetes and obesity in cats.

      You need to put your cat on canned only diet. The canned needs to be grain-free. That's the only way to prevent kidney disease, UTI, crystals, renal failure, irritable bowel syndrome, fatty liver disease, diabetes and obesity and many many more.

      Some good brands are Wellness, Felidae, Merrick, Nature's Variety, EVO, Blue buffalo Wilderness.

      Invest in your cats health by buying good quality food. You will save the pain and vet bills in the future.

      Good luck!

  24. QUESTION:
    Bad dog breath? What do I do?
    My dog has the WORST breath! It smells like straight up cow shi t! :/ What is something I can do for her? We don't feed her people food very much, every now and then maybe just a bite.
    Shes 12!

    • ANSWER:
      If your dog is older than two or three, he probably has dental disease. 90% of adult dogs have dental problems and brushing or water additives won't really help. I would look into having him checked by a vet to see if he needs his teeth cleaned. This is a procedure that requires anesthesia, but otherwise, it's just like when you have your teeth cleaned at the dentist. Plaque (the brown build up on their teeth) is calcified bacteria that can enter their blood stream and cause heart valve infections and kidney issues. If this is the problem, have his teeth cleaned and brush them daily. It will enhance his quality and quantity of life.
      If it's not his teeth, there can be several metabolic problems (such as kidney issues or diabetes) that can give a dog bad breath, but it's most likely his teeth.
      Talk to your vet about a dental cleaning. It's well worth the money.

  25. QUESTION:
    Why Do Cats eat there own cat litter ?.?

    We have had a new kitten & the older cat dont like him.
    I'ts the older cat eating it..
    The cat litter is not by there food..

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there...Here's an article found on iVillage about why cats eat their litter and what you can do to help:

      Cats are well-known for being fussy eaters, always demanding the freshest, tastiest foods. But occasionally a cat will go to the other extreme and begin snacking in the most unappetizing of places, the litter box.
      Eating litter isn't necessarily dangerous, although cats that take more than a small nibble may get obstructions in their intestinal tracts. The real problem isn't the litter lunch itself but the underlying condition that is causing them to take up the habit.
      "A cat that suddenly starts eating litter is almost always sick," says Jane Brunt, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Towson, Maryland. For example, cats with anemia, a condition in which the body doesn't have enough red blood cells, will sometimes eat litter. Vets aren't sure why they do it, but it may be nature's way of getting more iron into their systems. Cats with kidney disease or feline leukemia will also eat litter on occasion, she says.
      "Cats with poor diets, especially those given vegetarian diets, may crave nutrients," adds Carol A. Tice, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Cary, North Carolina. The clay used to make litter is rich in minerals and may act as a natural supplement. Cats that keep eating litter, however, may actually lose nutrients because the clay will leach out more minerals like iron, zinc, and potassium than it puts back in.

      t doesn't happen often, but sometimes cats will develop unusual compulsions, in which a normal habit, such as licking litter off their fur after using the litter box, becomes an uncontrollable urge, says Elizabeth Shull, D.V.M., a veterinary behaviorist and neurologist at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine in Knoxville. This type of compulsion is thought to be caused by chemical imbalances in the brain, she explains.
      Next page: See Your Vet If...

      See Your Vet If...
      Your cat is on a vegetarian diet.
      Your pet has pale or white gums.
      Your pet has eaten antifreeze, houseplants, or other harmful substances.
      She has missing or broken teeth.
      Her teeth are gray or black.
      She has been vomiting for more than a day or is vomiting blood.
      She has had diarrhea or constipation for a day or more.
      You have noticed weight gain or weight loss.
      Your pet hasn't eaten for more than 24 hours.
      She is eating, drinking, or urinating much more than usual.
      Her abdomen is bloated or feels tight.
      She is drooling more than usual.
      There is a bulge in her throat.
      Your pet seems unusually tired and lethargic.
      She has sores on her gums or tongue.
      She seems to be having trouble chewing or swallowing.

      A few common causes of appetite and eating problems are dental disease, cushing's disease, diabetes, cancer, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and kidney disease. Learn more about these common conditions now.
      Dental Disease
      Sometimes eating can literally be a pain. If your pet is chewing in a funny way (gingerly or on one side of her mouth), has bad breath, or has gums that are inflamed or bleeding, chances are that she has dental problems.
      Unlike humans, dogs and cats don't get cavities. But they do get other tooth and gum problems that can take away their appetites. Dental problems are quite common, affecting more than 80 percent of dogs and cats after the age of three. The most common dental problem is periodontal disease, in which bacteria-laden plaque on the teeth erodes gum tissue and possibly causes the teeth to loosen.
      To prevent periodontal disease, vets recommend brushing your pet's teeth every day. It is also a good idea to give her dry food and crunchy snacks since these will help scour the teeth clean. In addition, some vets recommend giving the teeth a professional cleaning once a year to prevent plaque from accumulating.

      Cushing's Disease
      This is a condition in which the pituitary gland produces excessive amounts of the hormone ACTH, causing the body to produce high levels of cortisol and other steroids. When cortisol levels rise, so does your pet's interest in eating and drinking. Cushing's disease, which is often caused by a tumor on the pituitary gland, affects mainly middle-aged, purebred dogs. One of the main symptoms is an increase in appetite. It can also cause your pet's coat to get dry and thin. The usual treatment for Cushing's disease is to give medications (usually for life) that decrease the body's ability to make cortisol.

      Diabetes
      Diabetes is a condition in which either the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body is unable to take full advantage of the insulin that is produced. Insulin is a hormone needed to transport glucose (blood sugar) and fats into the body's cells. When glucose and fats don't get inside cells, they stay in the bloodstream, damaging tissues throughout the body. Pets with diabetes will often drink enormous amounts of water -- the body's attempt to dilute the sugar- and fat-rich blood before it does harm.

      "There is all this sugar in the blood, but the cells are starving," adds Dean Gebroe, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Los Angeles. Pets with diabetes eat and drink with all their might, but without insulin, the cells are unable to take in the energy-giving glucose.
      Some pets with diabetes will require daily shots of insulin to lower blood sugar levels. In many cases, however, this condition can be controlled or even eliminated by simple lifestyle changes -- by helping overweight pets lose weight, for example, or by making changes in exercise and eating habits.
      Cancer
      As with any disease that affects the whole body, cancer will often stifle a dog's or cat's interest in eating. This is particularly true when the cancer affects the stomach, intestine, or any other part of the digestive tract.
      "A common scenario with an older dog or cat that suddenly stops eating is an invasive cancer somewhere in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the intestine," says Karen L. Overall, V.M.D., Ph.D., head of the behavior clinic at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine in Philadelphia.

      s with cancer in humans, there are many treatments available, from chemotherapy to radiation to surgery. And since it is essential for pets with cancer to eat properly in order to keep up their strength and keep the immune system working well, it is important to call your vet immediately if your pet's appetite seems to be dropping.

      Hyperthyroidism
      Pets with overactive (hyper) thyroid glands are hungry all the time, yet thin as a rail. They drink a lot, sleep less than they used to, and tend to be agitated and fidgety. "The thyroid is kind of like the gas pedal of the body," explains Sandra Sawchuk, D.V.M., clinical instructor of small animal medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine in Madison. "It regulates metabolism. If it's producing too much hormone, it's like revving the engine constantly."
      In cats, hyperthyroidism can be treated with medications that slow the metabolism to normal levels. Vets may also recommend treatments with radioactive iodine, which destroys abnormal thyroid tissue while keeping the gland intact. Radioactive iodine is usually the preferred option, says Dr. Gebroe, but also the most expensive. In dogs, surgery is usually needed to remove the overactive gland because it could contain a malignant cancer. "Because more than half of thyroid tumors in dogs are malignant, surgery will probably be required to help prevent the spread of the cancer to other organs," says Craig N. Carter, D.V.M., Ph.D., head of epidemiology at the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory at Texas A&M University in College Station. "The malignant form of thyroid cancer is much less common in cats, but it can occur and may also require surgery."

      Hypothyroidism
      Pets with underactive (hypo) thyroid glands don't produce enough of this important hormone to keep their metabolism running at healthy levels. As a result, their appetite drops, yet they gain weight. They may be sluggish and tired as well.
      While hypothyroidism is very rare in cats, it is one of the most common hormonal conditions in dogs. In most cases, it is easily treated by giving pets thyroid hormone supplements, which replenish the body's natural supply.
      Intestinal obstruction. When your pet develops a taste for inedible items, like pocket watches or rings, replacing your possessions may be the least of your concerns. Swallowing objects can cause an intestinal obstruction, resulting in a loss of appetite, constipation, nausea, abdominal pain, or vomiting. Intestinal obstructions can be life-threatening, so it is essential to see your vet immediately if you even suspect this is the problem.
      Your vet can identify intestinal obstructions with an x-ray. In most cases, however, surgery is the only way to remove swallowed objects and relieve the blockage.

      Kidney Disease
      In older pets particularly, kidney disease is a common cause of lost appetite. "If the kidney is not functioning properly, it can't filter all the toxins out of the blood," says Dr. Gebroe. "Toxins will accumulate, and your pet will lose her appetite."

      n addition to lost appetite, symptoms of kidney problems include drinking a lot, weight loss, and possibly vomiting.
      Kidney disease is serious, and your pet will probably need intravenous fluids to help flush the blood and keep her healthy. In addition, she will probably be given a special diet, along with medications, to help the kidneys work properly again.

  26. QUESTION:
    My dog always has fish breath and it's bad. She has pretty nice teeth so I dont think it's bad dental hygien.?
    What can this possibly be caused from and how do I fix it?

    • ANSWER:
      Most of us have smelled dog halitosis (bad breath) at one time or another. It is the result of the foul odor-producing bacteria buildup in a dog’s lungs, gut, or mouth. Chronic halitosis in a dog can indicate that it needs better dental care or there is a serious issue in its gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or liver.

      Dog Breath Causes

      The more common serious issues are gum (periodontal) or dental disease, and generally the smaller a dog is, the more vulnerable it is to tartar and plague. There are more serious issues that are possible, but less common, which include more extreme medical problems in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, organs, or respiratory system.

      Diagnosing Dog Breath

      One should normally bring his or her pet to the veterinarian to diagnose the reason behind the chronic bad breath. A vet can do a physical exam and laboratory work to pinpoint the problem. Come prepared with information on your dog’s diet, exercise routine, and behavioral habits.

      When Should I Take My Dog To The Vet?

      As soon as your dog’s breath has an unusual smell, bring it to the vet. Here are some symptoms:

      1. Unusually fruity/sweet breath can signify diabetes, especially if the dog has been drinking fluids and urinating more than usual.
      2. Dog breath that smells like urine can mean kidney disease.
      3. Bad breath along with vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas and/or gums can signify a liver problem.

      Dog Breath Cure

      Obviously, treatment depends on the cause of dog breath. If plaque is the cause, the dog may need a professional dental cleaning. If diet is the cause, then you should change what your dog is eating. If the cause of bad breath is related to gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, or lung issues, the vet should know the best route to take.

      Prevent Dog Breath

      Just because a dog is older does not mean that it is normal to have bad breath. Always take action and provide the best care that you can for your pet, as a method of prevention. Here are some good things to do:

      1. Bring the dog in for regular checkups at the vet to make sure it has no underlying medical issues.
      2. Have the vet monitor the condition of the dog’s teeth and breath.
      3. Provide the dog with a high-quality and easily digestible diet.
      4. Brush the dog’s teeth everyday if possible–or as frequently as you can if you cannot everyday. Be sure to brush with a toothpaste made for dog’s, since toothpaste for human’s can cause digestive problems in canines.
      5. Provide safe chew toys that encourage the natural process of chewing and teeth cleaning.
      6. Research dog treats that help with breath odor.
      7. Research dog oral health products to use at home and discuss them with your vet.

      Keep in mind that products designed to mask bad breath may not fix the cause of it. Also, most of these ideas discussed can also be used for cats.

  27. QUESTION:
    my dog got a terrible smell last few days its like smelly socks she 14 yrs old?

    • ANSWER:
      This can be any number of things:
      1) Anal glands. Has she had previous problems with this? Has she had loose stools recently? All can cause the anal glands around the anus to become impacted and cause this problem. To solve this they will need to be checked and emptied by the vet- your dog may also need anti-biotics as they could be infected also.
      2) The dog rolled in something nasty and just needs a bath.
      3) Have you checked in your dog's mouth? Smelly mouths can indicate alot of problems. If it is just bad breath it could be dental disease- again which needs to be checked by a vet. Or smells coming from the mouth can indicate diseases such as renal (kidney) failure or diabetes.
      Is she showing any other symptoms??
      So if it is anything other than number (2) you need to take your dog to your vet to be checked out.

  28. QUESTION:
    dog has bad breath after cleaning.?
    I recently rescued my begal/hound I got his teeth cleaned they were very bad and horrible breath. Now it's been about 2 month since i got his teeth cleaned, and his breath is really bad it almost smells like something dead in his mouth. does anyone know why this would be.

    • ANSWER:
      Most of us have smelled dog halitosis (bad breath) at one time or another. It is the result of the foul odor-producing bacteria buildup in a dog’s lungs, gut, or mouth. Chronic halitosis in a dog can indicate that it needs better dental care or there is a serious issue in its gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or liver.

      Dog Breath Causes

      The more common serious issues are gum (periodontal) or dental disease, and generally the smaller a dog is, the more vulnerable it is to tartar and plague. There are more serious issues that are possible, but less common, which include more extreme medical problems in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, organs, or respiratory system.

      Diagnosing Dog Breath

      One should normally bring his or her pet to the veterinarian to diagnose the reason behind the chronic bad breath. A vet can do a physical eam and laboratory work to pinpoint the problem. Come prepared with information on your dog’s diet, exercise routine, and behavioral habits.

      When Should I Take My Dog To The Vet?

      As soon as your dog’s breath has an unusual smell, bring it to the vet. Here are some symptoms:

      1. Unusually fruity/sweet breath can signify diabetes, especially if the dog has been drinking fluids and urinating more than usual.
      2. Dog breath that smells like urine can mean kidney disease.
      3. Bad breath along with vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas and/or gums can signify a liver problem.

      Dog Breath Cure

      Obviously, treatment depends on the cause of dog breath. If plaque is the cause, the dog may need a professional dental cleaning. If diet is the cause, then you should change what your dog is eating. If the cause of bad breath is related to gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, or lung issues, the vet should know the best route to take.

      Prevent Dog Breath

      Just because a dog is older does not mean that it is normal to have bad breath. Always take action and provide the best care that you can for your pet, as a method of prevention. Here are some good things to do:

      1. Bring the dog in for regular checkups at the vet to make sure it has no underlying medical issues.
      2. Have the vet monitor the condition of the dog’s teeth and breath.
      3. Provide the dog with a high-quality and easily digestible diet.
      4. Brush the dog’s teeth everyday if possible–or as frequently as you can if you cannot everyday. Be sure to brush with a toothpaste made for dog’s, since toothpaste for human’s can cause digestive problems in canines.
      5. Provide safe chew toys that encourage the natural process of chewing and teeth cleaning.
      6. Research dog treats that help with breath odor.
      7. Research dog oral health products to use at home and discuss them with your vet.

      Keep in mind that products designed to mask bad breath may not fix the cause of it. Also, most of these ideas discussed can also be used for cats.

  29. QUESTION:
    Rescued dog has bad breath and tooth decay. Vet wants to address other problems first.?
    We rescued a 3 year old English Bulldog from neglectful owners. He is only 46 lbs, all skin and bones. We immediatley took him to the vet we take our other to. The poor guy has horrible teeth (every tooth I saw had greyish decay), hookworms, bad knees, a chronic ear condition, and is severely malnourished. Obviously, the vet wants to treat the worms and weight first. He said next step would be his teeth.

    I would like to know if anyone has any suggestions about what we can do in the meantime to make him more comfortable. I am not concerned about getting the bad breath gone (though it would be nice). I just dont want him to be in any kind of pain. I know his previous diet was horrible. He vomited when we first brought him home and there were french fries, onions, potatoes, and other foods that led me to believe he had been eating trash. He wont eat dry food alone, so we have been mixing a small amount of canned food to make it more appealing to him. He wont chew DentaStix and I am sure it is because his mouth is tender. I have been able to get him to chew some Milkbones, though. We havent brushed his teeth yet because we want him to fully get used to us and our home and be comfortable before we do it. We dont him to get scared and try to bite so we are giving him an adjustment period. Any water supplements or treats like Milkbones (since I know he will eat those) or any other suggestions will be greatly appreciated!!
    #savethebulldogs

    • ANSWER:
      bad breath usually comes from bad gums. but it can mean diabetes.. etc... so you need to do bloodwork first. then, you will need to clean out his gums and teeth. are his feet crackled? sounds like he has parasites. go buy him a good quality canned dog food and mix it with some quality dry dog food, add a little water to it. feed it to him at exactly same time, 3x a day. in the same spot. low stress, and low exercise. he will be sick and sleepy for a couple of weeks from treatment. then you can begin a good health plan. you can ask for pain medication right away. dont bother his gums right now it will just cause more pain that you can cause him when he feels better and he can ignore it.

  30. QUESTION:
    why does my dog smell so bad?
    her name is princess shes old and when we give her baths we have to shampoo her twice to get rid of smell after a day she starts smelling again i don"t know why one time she ate cat food and her fur came of maybe that"s the reason i don"t know we haven"t took her to the vet because we don"t think its serious but when we bought her a new dog shampoo that"s says it takes of the bad smell of your dog it didn"t work please help
    she does not smell like poo or roll around she just lays in bed

    • ANSWER:
      Well you say your princess is old, so older dogs seem to get diseases or sick.
      Here could be some causes of the odor: Veterinarian care for these problems
      - kidney failure and diabetes can cause bad breath
      - a dental disease can cause a terrible odor and you may not realize its coming from the mouth
      - infection in the ears can cause a terrible smell and when you wash the dog the water gets stuck in the canal which causes more of a smell

      Another cause could be your dogs skin is dry. Usually dogs have naturally oily skin.But when the skin becomes to oily or to dry then it can create a odor. When you keep washing the dog you are disturbing the dogs normal, healthy dermal surface cells and bacteria, leading to loss of natural oils.
      So every day put a little unscented baby powder and don't wash the dog as much until the skin has ame back to the normal and healthy odor.

  31. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of bad dog breath?
    My dog (beagle/lab mix) has absolutely horrible breath. I know dogs aren't supposed to have minty fresh breath, but this is out of control. My other dog's breath isn't half as bad. Does anyone have any ideas on how to get rid of it? I brush his teeth 2 times a week, he eats Natural Balance dry food, I feed him treats that are supposed to freshen breath (such as greenies) and he has plenty of toys to chew on. Is there anything else I can do?
    Whitney, he will be 2 July 2nd
    anabanana...what do you mean give him more water? He always has access to clean fresh drinking water. I would never keep water from my dog.
    Karate K...He does not have gum disease. I have already had him checked for this. And Natural Balance is a very good food.

    • ANSWER:
      Raw bones. They're really the only thing that gets deep down between their teeth. Get some beef knuckle bones from any butcher, make sure they are fresh and still have some meat clinging to them, tearing the meat and connective tissue off is what cleans their teeth. Keep them frozen until you use them so they don't rot and make your dog sick. I give one or two a week to my dogs, at the recommendation of my vet and dog trainer, they have great breath and shiny white teeth.

      If the raw bones do not solve the breath problem, it's worth a trip to the vet, there are medical conditions, like diabetes, that can cause bad breath, or your dog could have an abscessed tooth that needs to be removed.

  32. QUESTION:
    My dog was castrated 4 weeks ago , and since then he has not been himself.?
    He is still his lively self. But after the op 3 days later went back for a check up and she said that he had a sore throat caused by the tube they put down him. Since then he still has a choking sound when out on walk, he is on a harness so he is not pulled around the throat! He has been sick a couple of times at home and loose stalls last few days , He does drink quite abit of water , but has also snapped a couple of times at us which is not like. Also he seems to be out of breath quite alot which he never used at all as he is only 15 months old staffie x jackrussel! just lying there he can be panting! do you think this may down to the op (infection etc), or some also mentioned he may have Diabetes? what are the symptons?

    • ANSWER:
      He feels badly first of all because his manhood is gone, it was a very big procedure for him to undergo.

      His hormone levels are probably out of wack too, castration removes the hormones he is use to. His body is going through TONS of changes.

      He is drinking a lot of water because he most likely is dehydrated, try buying some children's Pedialyte at the store. This will correct any imbalances in his electrolyte levels.

      He is snapping because not only did his hormones take a total jump to NONE AT ALL and he is having mood swings, but he probably is still sore. A woman has a hyterectomy and it takes her sometimes months to heal totally and to stop hurting from the sergury.

      Give him some ZINC losenges oir pills, this will help to heal his little throat. Call the vet to ask the dosages to give. He or she might also recommend certain brands. Ask if you can use some that people use, which you can buy less expensively than pet pills or locenges.

      His breath is bad most likely due to bacteria in his throat, a tube is a foreign object and it was introduced into his otherwise sterile body. Bacteria make smells as well as infection, you can feed him Parsley on his food to help. However I would recommend you call your vet to get him on some Arethromyacin drops, which is a liquid antibiotic. It is better to be safer than sorry with a beloved pet. The drops are fairly inexpensive, and far cheaper than other procedures he'd need if the infection got worse, or spread.

  33. QUESTION:
    My dog teeth need help?
    I have a 6.5 month old mini schnauzer and his breath STINKS. He lost a baby tooth today(like a molar)[is it supposed to fall out?] and I was looking at it and saw brown in it I smelled it and it smelled like crap but he's never eaten his own poop. I poked it with a stick and I removed some brown stuff all easy. Tell me what do I do. I don't want him nuetured(I want to breed him once when he gets older so I can have a memory of him when the time comes) so what do I do?
    His tooth smelled just like his breath
    The nutered thing is that thy tell me that to only put him under anestesia once
    I poked the tooth web it fell out and I will only keep one the one that looks more like him the rest will be given to my family

    • ANSWER:
      Hey, I don't want to alarm you, but this could be a VERY serious problem. First, dogs do NOT have "baby teeth". Never will they have a baby tooth that is "supposed" to fall out.

      The most common cause of bad breath in dogs is periodontal disease which can be life threatening if left untreated. Bacteria that grow in a dog’s mouth eventually mineralize into tartar which can progress into an infection of the gums. From there, it spreads to the bones which means serious trouble. Your vet may prescribe an in office cleaning, tooth brushing or even antibiotics. The best way to fight this cause of periodontal disease is through prevention by brushing your pet’s teeth everyday. This is especially true of smaller breeds as they tend to have more trouble with their teeth. If a dog eats poop, it can cause "stinky breath", but you indicated that your dog doesn't do that.

      Other causes of bad breath in dogs are infections and diseases and should be considered if dental hygiene is not an issue. Sinus infections, upper respiratory infections or even cancer can cause disagreeable breath. Dogs with lips larger than their mouths may also develop an infection of the skin in their lip folds. Other diseases that affect breath are kidney disease or diabetes. If your dog has bad breath and you take care of their teeth, take them to the vet right away.

      If you aren't brushing his teeth (don't laugh - it is something that needs to be done on a lot of breeds) with a dog-formulated toothpaste, then you really do need to get him to a vet for a check up so the vet can recommend a course of treatment. It may very well save his life. At just 6 months old, something has gone wrong pretty fast and spread pretty quickly inside his little mouth.

      Good luck to you and your pet!

      EDIT: My bad - dogs do have baby teeth - just did some research and realized that most lose theirs around 3 months of age, but some can lose them later than that. Bad research on my part as far as baby teeth on dogs goes.

  34. QUESTION:
    Does Diet effect your body oder.?
    I know body oder is caused by alot of different things but is diet a factor to? im doing a paper about hygiene. i just wanted some 2nd opinion thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      BEST ANSWER PLEASE!!!
      What you exhale through your breath and your skin is a good indicator of what's going on inside your body. If you start to stink within hours of not using deodorant, rest assured there is putrefaction or fermentation going on inside your body, and that indicates a poor diet, usually.
      Did you know that dogs can smell cancer on your breath? This has been verified by scientists. With special training, these dogs can actually smell cancer. They can also be trained to smell bladder cancer in your urine. Search Google for "dog sniffing bladder cancer" if you don't believe me.

      If dogs can smell cancer, it's not unreasonable that some people might be able to detect it as well. Some holistic health practitioners that I know tell me that they can smell cancer in patients. That's because cancer emits a specific odor, and a lot of people who are using deodorant are simply trying to cover up odors that could actually serve as a health indicator.

      Most Americans can't imagine going through a day without using deodorant. That's because they stink so bad that they feel obligated to apply toxic deodorant products to their bodies every single day. I used to be one of those people, but I have since learned that the things that make you stink are the same things that make you unhealthy, namely, milk, cheese, meat, animal fats and refined carbohydrate products like white flour. Animal products are the most offensive dietary sources of internal stink by far, and milk products produce the greatest funk of all.

      The more animal products you consume, the more toxic fumes you're going to emit from your armpits (and other regions). Most people believe a lot of misinformation about body odor; they think the body just naturally stinks and that body odor is just a result of bacteria growth in your armpits. This is utterly false. The body doesn't just naturally stink.

      The fact is, body odor is primarily the toxic gas from the fermentation or putrefaction processes going on inside your body due to the ingestion of animal products and processed, refined foods. Yes, there are bacteria in your armpits, but the kinds of bacteria that are living there depend on what you are "feeding" them. In other words, if your body is emitting nontoxic waste products, it's just perspiring excess minerals and normal healthy metabolic byproducts. That means the bacteria living in your armpits are not going to be as offensive as the ones that might be living there if your skin is emitting toxic byproducts of animal product digestion.

      I encourage you to take the 48-hour no-deodorant test, because it really will tell you something about your internal health. If you find that, during the 48 hours, you can't stand being around yourself because of your own body odor, then that's a strong indicator that it's time to start changing what you eat.

      Americans love to cover up symptoms rather than address their root cause. We like shortcuts, and it's a lot easier and quicker to apply a paste of aluminum salts to our armpits than actually clean up our metabolic processes. Americans are typically very hesitant to make lifestyle changes that require giving up their favorite foods, which might be chicken fried steak, a milkshake or a grilled cheese sandwich. Americans don't want to give that up and, as a result, they are dying from completely preventable metabolic diseases with names like breast cancer, diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis.

      Detecting the presence of these diseases is easier than you might think. You don't need thousands of dollars in laboratory tests to know that something is wrong (although lab tests can certainly be handy in confirming their presence). All you have to do is to assess your own smell. If your body stinks, that's a sure sign that there is something rancid going on inside, and disease processes are inevitably underway. Think about it: If you small that bad on the outside, imagine what's going on inside!

      You know who has the cleanest bodies of all? Raw food vegans. Clean bodies, clear heads, open channels. Check out folks like Dr. Gabriel Cousens at the Tree of Life Rejuvenation Center if you want to learn how to revolutionize your body, mind and spirit by starting with healthful food choice.

      Your body's metabolic engine
      Your body is a metabolic engine, and the exhaust of the engine is determined by what you are feeding the engine. You know how it's difficult to breathe if you're driving behind a diesel truck? The diesel exhaust is the result of the dirty fuels. In the body of a person who eats dirty food fuels (like animal products), there is similarly a horrible exhaust emitted from many different exhaust locations, including the tailpipe. What you emit is a very good indicator of your overall level of health.
      If you do change your foods and clean up your food fuels, you could potentially save yourself from many different degenerative diseases. Just as

  35. QUESTION:
    My dogs breath literally smells like a sewer - chronically- how do i fix this?
    What can I do to make my dog's breath not stink?

    i've tried dentabones, and just about everything else including brushing his teeth fairly often with non fluoride toothpaste...

    funny thing about fluoride toothpaste... They tell us not to give it to dogs because it's toxic, yet, we feed it to ourselves, and our children -TWICE DAY EVERY DAY- it's toxic to HUMANS too... we just live longer by nature so we don't notice the killing effect nearly as quickly...

    I'm not kidding by the way... look it up..

    the same goes for human food... we're told not to feed our dogs Potato chips, and most other food that we eat.... why? because it will kill them......... gee............. if it kills them... it'll kill us too... just.. takes longer.......... also true.... look up the effects of aspartame, MSG, and High Fructose Corn Syrup. High Fructose Corn Syrup is thought to be the main cause of juvinile diabetes (which didn't exist, or was VERY rare 30 years ago)..

    Corn syrup, and, well, corn in general are bad for you.. Corn is horrible for anything that eats it. Corn is 100% man made.... also not an exageration. dogs aren't meant to eat corn.... it's not a part of their natural diet.... Cows didn't eat corn in the wild either.... neither do chickens.... people never ate corn prior to the indians inventing it, then white man furthering it to what it is today.

    corn makes animals sick... They force feed corn to beef cattle, then have to dope them up with tons of steroids and other crap so they CAN digest the corn.........

    when WE eat corn, 95% of it comes right out the other end exactly how it went in... even we cant digest it.

    but corn is in EVERYTHING we sell.... why? because the US Government subsidises it.......

    but... that doesn't mean it's healthy.... i hate the fact that i have to feed it to my dogs, but i've yet to find another alternative...

    so, what do i do to make his breath not stink?

    • ANSWER:
      You need to take him to the vet for a dental. He obviously has tartar build up on his teeth or infected gums. Don't wait, this can poison his whole system, he needs a dental asap.

  36. QUESTION:
    DOG DIABETIC SUGAR LEVEL RAISED? HELP?
    Hello, we are new with dog diabetes, our dog who is a chi-wini weighing 13 lbs was diagnosed nov 25th 2012. He was in kiotosis (spelling?) stage, he was frequently urinating, going to the bathroom all the time, his breath smelled like an alcohol swab, and he was very weak. We took him to the vet where they diagnosed him with diabetes, his blood sugar was 502. They prescribted us 1 unit of insulin 2x/day, which we have been doing, religiously! He has more energy now, and his alcohol pad breath went away, he is able to jump on the couch again,etc. So we were hopeful that his insulin was working, we took him to the vet today, his blood sugar was 529! So, it has increased! He ate at 10am his appointment was at 4:30pm, no treats or food between this time... They increased his insulin to 2 units 2x/day, I am concerned about this... I want to start testing daily, ALSO I would like to start testing his blood sugar from home--I have a freestyle lite test strip/meter, is the numbers they give accurate as this is a human meter? Is there some type of a conversion? Any information would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      Spot checks at the vet's office can fluctuate quite a bit. Excitement from the car ride, being around other dogs, and knowing they're at the vet's can cause a spike in blood sugar. Once he's been on insulin for a month or so, talk to your vet about a fructosamine level. This is a test that will most likely have to be sent to a lab, but it gives you an average blood sugar for the past couple of weeks. So, a dog may spot check at the vet with a blood sugar of 500+ but have a fructosamine level that's only 250 or so. This is a much better indication of how the treatment is working.
      You can test at home, but test sites on dogs are harder to find than they are on cats. Most people don't test dogs at home because dogs are better about showing their owners how they feel; some cats aren't. Cats will act as normal as they can until they physically can't. Dogs tend to not be like this.
      The testing at home will give you a ball park, but it's not 100% accurate (ie: no where near as accurate as with humans). Talk to your vet about testing sites and if they think it would help. Some vets don't recommend it because the test should be done around the same time the insulin is given and this can make some dogs not want to eat. Using the lancets that come with the test meter usually hurt worse than the insulin shot does.
      I would hold off on testing until he's been on insulin for a while. Let his blood sugar stabilize as much as it can before you start poking him more. Figuring insulin dosages in dogs and cats is harder than it is with people. The best thing to do is start with one unit and work your way up slowly. Putting a dog into insulin shock is more dangerous than taking a while to get them regulated. Too much insulin too soon can kill a dog. It's safer to move up gradually.
      Since he's improving, stick with your vet's treatment plan. It can take a while to get the dose figured out completely.
      Be patient. It sounds like you're on the right track, though, so just stick with it. I hope this helps. I know diabetes can be frustrating to deal with. I worked as a vet tech for almost ten years, and I had an insulin resistant diabetic cat, so I know it's a lot to deal with, but you sound like you're doing good so far. Good luck and I hope your boy continues to improve.

  37. QUESTION:
    What should you do when your dog is sick?
    His name is hercules. It started the other day when he ate some cat food. I freaked out so I took out all of the animal food in the house and put grass in his bowl. I heard that dogs feel better once they eat grass, but now he has started throwing up everywhere. Don't worry, I scold him for doing that in the house, but I don't know what to do. Why isn't the grass working? I even tried pouring some pepto bismol in his water bowl for a day, but that didn't work. Can someone please help me?
    To the first person:
    I am not kidding. Why would I do that to myself? I'm not supid! I didn't know what I was doing, so that's why I asked.
    I'm NOT KIDDING!!! I swear on my father's grave. God, why is this story so hard to believe? I thought grass would make him better, and pepto makes me better, so that's what I did.

    • ANSWER:
      I found this and pasted it for you. I hope it helps

      Symptoms
      The following table is only a general guideline and is not meant to replace a diagnosis from a qualified veterinarian.

      While we have listed possible causes for specific symptoms, this doesn't confirm your pet has a particular illness, and there may be other causes not listed for each specific symptom. Your vet will consider your dog's symptoms and perform any testing necessary to give you the most complete and accurate diagnosis.

      Sick Dog Symptoms and Possible Causes Symptom Causes
      Bad Breath periodontal disease

      Bleeding Gums periodontal disease

      Bloody Stools worms, intestinal blockage, anal fissure caused by constipation

      Blood in Urine urinary tract infection, kidney disease, internal injury

      Brownish Ear Discharge ear infection, ear mite infestation
      Constipation change of diet, intestinal blockage

      Lumps ulcerations, cysts, tumors
      Coughing windpipe blockage, kennel cough, pneumonia, heartworm, heart disease
      Diarrhea change in diet, stress, dog flu, Parvo virus, Corona virus
      Hair Loss parasitic infection, dog skin allergies
      Head Shaking ear infection or infestation
      Increased Drinking canine diabetes, kidney disease, liver disease, Cushings disease
      Inflamed Ears ear infection or infestation
      Irritated Skin parasitic infestation, allergic reaction
      Less Frequent Bowel Movements constipation, partial bowel blockage, loss of appetite
      Less Frequent Urination kidney stones/disease
      Lethargy caused by any number of illnesses and disorders
      Lameness injury, canine hip and elbow dysplasia
      Loss of Appetite numerous causes ranging from dislike of diet to serious illness
      Pale Gums shock
      Pale Tongue shock
      Panting over-heating, dehydration, respiratory infection, heartworm infestation of the heart and lungs
      Pot Belly worm infestation, canine obesity
      Scratching parasitic infestation, dog skin allergies/infections
      Stiff Movement injury, canine arthritis, canine dysplasia
      Smelly Ears ear infection
      Temperature above 102°F viral or bacterial infection, dehydration/heat stroke
      Vomiting dog flu, worm infestation, gastrointestinal disorder, algae poisoning
      Watery Eyes allergies, in-grown eyelash
      Sudden/Dramatic Weight Loss worm infestation, cancer, Cushings disease
      [edit]When It's Time to Call the Vet
      Most pets will display one or more of these sick dog symptoms at some point during their lives, but there isn't always a need to rush them directly to the vet. Symptoms that only last a day and do not seem severe may simply need to run their course. However, a consultation with your vet is in order when:

      Sick dog symptoms increase or intensify over a 24 hour period.
      Symptoms persist more than a day.
      The animal in question is in obvious distress.
      Conclusion
      In the long run, it's better to be safe than sorry, so if you believe your dog may truly be ill, don't hesitate to call your vet for advice and an appointment. After all, doesn't your dog deserve as much care as any other member of the family?

  38. QUESTION:
    cat breathe [eewwww]? help??
    HI my cat has the most horrible breathe ever it is sooo bad i'll bet you it could kill a skunk[lol] can i use dog tooth paste on her or do i have to use cat tooth paste?? will it hurt her help we've tried all kinds of cat food nothing helps soo maybe brushing her teeth would help?? but ya can i use it???

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there...generally, when a cat exhibits bad breath it could be a result of either periodontal, kidney, respiratory or liver disease to diabetes, skin disease (involving tissue around the lips) or oral trauma, such as electric cord injury. However, by far, the most common problem associated with bad breath is periodontal disease. All which will require a veterinarian's evaluation to treat respectively.

      More about feline bad breath causes by Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine for Feline Health:
      http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/news/badBreath.htm

      Ideally, cat toothpaste would be better to use for brushing teeth.

      Here's an instructional video on how to brush cats teeth by Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine for Feline Health: http://www.felinevideos.vet.cornell.edu/brushing_teeth/full_movie.shtml

  39. QUESTION:
    Any suggestions for a change in dog food to eliminate bad doggy breath?
    I took my dog to the vet as he has sour breath ewww!! The vet said his teeth are just fine and his mouth. It is a digestive problem. (Hes an anxiety dog to say the least!) He only eats dry dog food, and some veggies. My dog was on beneful, now we have switched him for the last month to Performatrin lamb and rice. It was suggested by the pet store because its easier to digest. We also started giving him a couple spoons of yogurt daily. Anyways, his breath still stinks like vinegar. Any suggestion on a dog food for digestive issues would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      ~ I would suggest you put him on a High Quality dog food. You haven't been feeding your dog very good food.

      +All dog foods are not created equal. There is a huge difference in ingredients, quality of ingredients and company standards. When wondering what to get or comparing your current food it is best to do as much research as possible.

      Your options are a raw diet, which is one of the greatest diets for dogs. To learn more go to www.barfworld.com. Raw really means nothing cooked; meat, bones and organs. This is not to be confused with allowing your dog to eat cooked bones, cooked bones are harmful, raw bones are not. This is the dog’s ancestral diet. If you think a dog should not be eating raw meat, go back and study wolves. Ask yourself what year was dog food made and then how long have dogs been around without our help of over processed dog food and gravy.

      Another option is kibble and wet food. You can do both or just Kibble, but avoid doing just wet food. Feeding Kibble 2x a day 12 hours apart and wet food 2x a week in place of 1 feeding of equal calories is a good balance. DO NOT OVER DUE WET FOOD> When you are looking for a healthy dog food it is important that not only the kibble be high quality but the wet food, treats and chews be high quality as well.

      Foods to avoid: Pedigree, Beneful, Purina, Iams, Nutro, Alpo, Ol Roy, Mighty Dog, Ceser, Eukanuba, Science Diet, Purina, Royal Canin, Eagle Pack (not to be confused with Eagle Pack Holistic) and of course all grocery store brands of dog food!

      These foods have low quality ingredients that can cause allergies, diabetes, bloat, overweight, oily skin, excessive and or runny stool and a myriad of other problems.

      Most of these brands are owned by companies like Del Monte, Proctor and Gamble, Mars and Nestle. Do you really believe that a company like Proctor and Gamble who makes beauty products, household cleaning supplies, baby items,prescription drugs and many others is the best suited company to make quality products for dogs? 50% of Mars is pet food, 45% is unhealthy snacks like candy bars. Science Diet is promoted by vets who in return make a profit on every bag they sell. Hill's is the largest employer of veterinarians outside of academia. They sponsor many pet nutrition related veterinary school programs and hold seminars and training sessions on the subject of pet nutrition for practicing veterinarians. So of course Hill's is going to say they are the best, they are teaching the vets pet nutrition, they want to make a profit, not healthy cat and dog food. Does this sound like the best company to make dog food? All of these companies have one thing in common, they have the advertising to make you believe pictures of meat and veggies and healthy dogs running around on the commercials is what you will get. Knowing the truth about what is in these foods is devastating.

      Quality dog foods: Innova, California Natural, EVO, Karma, Wellness, Wellness Core, Orijen, Canidae, Merricks, Artemis, Taste of the Wild, Nature's Variety, Solid Gold-Barking at the Moon, Go!, Now! and Timberwolf.

      Here are several websites to do your own research, which I highly suggest. A lot of questions here about dog’s health problems are a direct result of the food you are feeding. Read the ingredients label on the back, go to the website and see who owns the dog food, look up the ingredients and learn why it is used and what the pros and cons are. Changing to a healthy low grain, no grain dog food will relieve most of your dog aliments and give you a healthier and happier dog.

      www.naturapet.com

      www.dogfoodproject.com

      www.dogfoodanalysis.com

      www.api4animals.org/facts.php?p=359&more=1

      www.feedmypet.com/dog-food-comparison.html

      www.canidae.com

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hill's_Pet_Nutrition

  40. QUESTION:
    my dog breath is smelling like poop. what could cause this?

    • ANSWER:
      Does he eat poop?

      Other than that, how old is he? Any other signs? Various things can cause bad breath in dogs (from dental disease to diabetes to kidney failure), without smelling his breath (or at least more history), there is no way for me to have a better idea.

  41. QUESTION:
    Is this just stress causing this?
    I never got any answers last time so I thought I would post again hoping more people are on

    I am a 22 year old female. I am a bit overweight (5 Foot 4 Inches and weigh 190 Pounds). I am a bit unfit as I am generally lazy (although I do get some exercise such as rollar blading, walking dog 5 times a day etc). Heart issues and diabetes run in the family. I am a McDonalds junky, pop junky and love my coffee and tea. I am under a ton of stress ( I am bipolar) and have an anxiety issue. I am currently unmedicated (waiting a Doc appointment). I also get winded easily (like from running for 10-15 seconds, running up the stairs, but i think thats me being unfit)

    Ok, so I have to get my wisdome teeth out under sedation and I am a worry wart and decided to get a health check. The Doc listened to my Heart and said it was a little fast (could of been nerves, stress etc), said my blood pressure was great, lung sounds good and didnt hear anything up with my heart but he sent me off for Blood work and an ECG which I got today. I get results tomorrow. Now, he also told me I had an earlobe crease which could be a sign of heart disease and of course this worries me.

    The main reason for going to the Doc was because I *think* I have been having palpitations every now and again (during high stress periods). It feels like a sinking feeling in the middle of my chest for half a second. (you know when you get very bad news like a family member died and your heart feels weird for a couple seconds) it feels like that. As well as an odd heart cramp (like for a second it hurts to breath in but goes away fast). I dont get dizzy after exercise or anything.

    My question is could this be due to tons of stress/anxiety? My bad eating habits? When I was at the dentist for a consult they took my BP and Heart rate and said my Heart rate was 68 (normal) and my BP was normal. I am just sooooo worried something is wrong.

    • ANSWER:
      Well, as those who have answer had said, it's just a mix of stress, anxiety, and poor diet.

      I suffer from palpitations on a random, irregular basis. What causes my palpitations (I hope) is just a mix of stress, anemia, crazy diet, and second-hand smoking.

      Now, to help you determine whether or not you suffer from palpitations, you must first know the various symptoms associated with it.

      Health.com answer:
      Heart palpitations can feel like:

      There is a pounding or fluttering in the chest.
      The heart is doing a flip-flop.
      The heart is skipping or missing a beat.
      The heart is racing.
      There is an extra heartbeat.
      The heart is beating in the neck.

      If your heart feels anything like the symptoms above, or similar, then you may be suffering from palpitations.

      Is it serious? Usually, no. However, in your case, I would ask a doctor to do more tests to be sure it isn't a heart disease.

      What sorts of tests, you ask? The best option depends on how frequent these palpitations are.

      If it's every day, you can do simple heart monitoring test and if anything weird happens, your doc should look deeper into it. Make sure he doesn't brush it off and give a simple diagnosis! In your case, it's very important to make sure it's nothing serious.

      However, if it's rare and random, talk to your doctor about getting a pacemaker.

      I think that's everything... I'm no doctor/nurse, but researching online helps a lot.

      Best of luck to you!

  42. QUESTION:
    Are there proven benefits of feeding "non-filler" foods?
    I am trying to get a better understanding of what dry dog food I should be feeding. I understand that brands like Innova and Canidae, etc... are more natural, whole product foods. I understand that brands like Purina and Iams, etc... contain corn and byproducts. Of course, "all natural" sounds better than "byproducts." So... QUESTION 1: Can anyone tell me what health problems a dog can incur by eating the "filler" brands vs the "non-filler" brands?

    Preservatives and artificial ingredients, or course, arent the best things for you. But, everyone is going to eat them at some point. What I would really like to know is... QUESTION 2: What ingredients should I look for that are dangerous to my dogs and if I avoid those is that all that really matters?

    I need some proof that the more expensive brands are really worth their weight in gold. I know it sounds better. Just like a filet steak sounds better for me to eat than a hot dog, but we all cant afford to eat filet everyday

    • ANSWER:
      Here are the problems proven to be related to bad food:

      -dry skin
      -allergies
      -hot spots
      -poor coat
      -dental disease
      -bad breath
      -fatty tumors
      -some cancers
      -shorter lifespan
      -obesity
      -blood sugar problems (diabetes)
      -larger, smellier stools
      -yeast infections (especially in ears)
      -faster aging and aging related problems
      -and of course, the risk of various poisons- look at the mass recall of low-quality foods we just had, and the hundreds of animals that died of kidney failure from the contaminated foods. That wasn't the first time something like that happened, and it won't be the last.

      Want to know what's REALLY in those cheap dog foods? How about...
      -road kill
      -euthanized pet animals (dogs, cats, and horses)
      -chemical preservatives proven to cause cancer
      -diseased, cancerous carcasses removed from human meat plants
      -hair, feathers, beaks, hooves, and other inedible body parts
      -wheat, corn, peanut hulls, newspaper ash, and other totally nutritonless and even dangerous filler materials
      -rancid animal fat
      -added sugar, salt, dye, and other questionable ingredients
      Read more about the digusting truth about pet foods:
      http://www.api4animals.org/facts.php?p=359&more=1
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/jesse.htm#commercial
      http://www.healthyhappydogs.com/DogFood

      A good food brand can eliminate most of these problems. Such brands include Innova EVO, Wellness, Artemis, Chicken Soup, Canidae, Timberwolf Organics, Solid Gold, Orijens, and more.

      Really, though, a raw food diet is your best bet to eliminate ALL of those problems though- while you're doing your research, make sure you take a look at that too. If you buy in bulk and freeze the meat, it actually works out to be cheaper than most commercial dog foods, and it's by FAR the healthiest option for your dog. Here is some further reading into raw feeding for your dog and the benefits of it:
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/
      http://www.rawlearning.com/rawfaq.html
      http://dogsobediencetraining.com/info/dog_food_11.htm
      http://www.4loveofdog.com/benefits.htm
      http://www.jolietschutzhund.com/raw%20food%20diet%20for%20dogs.htm

      Good luck in your research. Keep in mind that feeding pets is not supposed to be cheap, it's supposed to keep them healthy. The better you feed your pet, the less vet bills you will have, and the longer your pet will be alive to love you.

  43. QUESTION:
    Sore/scratchy throat, ear infection, really bloodshot eyes?
    Last week I felt like I had a cold (fever, aches, chills, tired, & veryyy sore throat). Those symptoms only lasted about 2 days or so then I felt better, except my throat was killing me!! It has hurt soo bad that last couple days.

    Then last night when got home, my ear felt like it does when your on a plane, when it feels like its gunna pop, but then it didn't! & late at night I woke my mom up at like 1 am (Im 17) to go get ear drops that my friend suggested because my ear hurt soo bad I couldn't even sleep! They helped my ear alot, enough to sleep, but I went to the doc this morning and they said I have an ear infection so they gave me Amoxecylin (sp?). Now my ear is numb from the drops so I cant feel the pain, my throat hurts and is doing that scratchy feeling making me cough constantly, but now alll day my eyes have been SOO bloodshot and blurry! I have no idea whats going on with my body. Ideas? Are bloodshot eyes common with colds? Ive never had it this bad before.

    • ANSWER:
      Tonsillitis:

      The main symptom of tonsillitis is a sore throat. More symptoms occur in most cases. Some or all of the following may be present:
      •Fever
      •Bad breath
      •Nasal congestion and runny nose
      •Swollen lymph nodes
      •Red, swollen tonsils covered completely or in patches by pus
      •Difficulty swallowing
      •Headache
      •Abdominal (belly) pain
      •Raw, bleeding patches on the tonsils
      When you have sore throat plus cold symptoms such as nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, and coughing, the cause is most likely a virus. Viral infection of the tonsils usually goes away without treatment within 2 weeks.
      TONSILS:
      Tonsils are like street dogs in Ur vicinity. They are just like security guards for Ur entire body-house.
      When a thief/stranger enters Ur locality to observe the surroundings to commit a crime/theft; the street dog[s] starts barking continuously cautioning U against the dangers ahead.
      Similarly, much before the entry of a serious virus/bacteria into Ur body, the first organs to be affected are tonsils-which are nothing but lymph glands.
      As u r aware that lymphatic system is nothing but a drainage system. If tonsils are removed surgically, it is as good as killing Ur security guards given by the God.
      It is prudent and safe to see a local homoeopath for total cure.

      'Health In Ur Hands' by Dr.Devendra Vora vol.i & ii. Available all over the globe & in all Indian Languages + Braille lipi, Germany and the French. Dr.Vora, the world renowned Acupressurist, an octogenarian and the Bhishma Pithamaha of acupressure in India, wrote the books, after treating and caused to treat more than 150000 cases of Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, and many other most dreaded diseases.

  44. QUESTION:
    How do I get my dog to not stink so bad?
    I have a great dane. He is an awesome dog but he really smells!! Its not like a nasty smell just a very strong musky dog odor that is making my house smell like a kennel. Any suggestions for helping him to not smell so strong? He was neutered as a puppy so it's not hormones. I have tried baking soda, which was a suggestion I was given a while back, and it didn't work. I don't want to have to bathe him constantly because it's bad for him. Any suggestions of types of shampoos that might help the situation?
    This isn't a sick smell. He just has a very strong dog smell. Just like any dog will smell just HUGE because he is a big dog. Thanks everyone for your answers so far!! :)

    • ANSWER:
      If your dog smells bad and the odor is coming from within your dog, it is an indication that she may be suffering from certain chronic disease. Care has to be taken to find out the underlying cause and, if you are unable to do so, a trip to your veterinarian is advisable.
      Here are just a few possible problems that cause dog odor:
      Bad Breath (Dog Halitosis)
      Very often, a dog smells bad because of his breath! Dog bad breath can be caused by indigestion, constipation, or dental problems such as gingivitis. A dog's breath does not have to be stinky. In fact, healthy dogs usually have fresh breath. The best way to prevent dog bad breath is to feed your dog a natural diet and of course brush her teeth regularly. Visit our page on canine teeth cleaning to learn how to clean and brush your dog's teeth.
      Also go to our page on bad breath in dogs for information on different causes of dog bad breath and the use of natural remedies to freshen up the doggie breath.
      Ear Infections
      If the dog odor comes from the head of your dog, lift up her ear flaps and check her ears. Ears infected by bacteria can cause discharge with offensive odor. It is therefore essential to regularly check your dog's ears for mites, dirt, debris, and possible infection.
      Regular ear cleaning is also important to keep those ears clean and fresh. Don't know how to clean your dog's ears? Visit this page. Also visit our page on dog ear infections for more information on this topic.
      Flatulence
      Sometimes the dog odor comes from the rear end of our pet! Yes - I am talking about "gas". Dog flatulence can be so smelly that it can knock you out. There are hosts of reasons as to why our dogs have gas - from eating too fast to constipation to allergies. A poor diet can also cause dog flatulence. Chronic flatulence can be a sign of parasites so if your dog has odorous gas constantly, it is advisable to take her to the vet for a check-up. Visit our page on flatulence in dogs for more information on this dog odor problem.
      Anal Gland Problems
      Anal gland problems, such as impacted anal glands or anal gland abscess, are rather common in dogs. When your dog has one of these problems, you will definitely notice a distinct, powerful odor coming from his rear end. Another indication of anal gland problem is that you will notice your dog scooting on the floor from time to time. If your dog's anal glands are impacted, you need to have the glands expressed - either by yourself or by a groomer or a vet. For more information on this not-so-aromatic topic, please visit our page on dog anal glands.
      Other Medical Problems
      Other medical problems that can cause dog odor include yeast infections, diabetes, kidney failure, and cancers.
      Dog Odor - External Causes
      Of course, there is always the possibility that the dog odor comes from the "outside". For example, your dog might have been sprayed by a skunk, or she might have rolled in something smelly.
      If your dog has been skunked, you need to act quickly before so that the skunk spray (which is actually an oil) can be neutralized before it gets soaked into your dog's coat. Visit our page on How to Remove Skunk Smell from Dogs for more information.

      Top

      Dog Odor - Essential Oil to the Rescue

      If you have a dog who likes rolling in smelly stuff, regular showers are called for to help remove the stink. You may also consider adding some essential oils to the shampoo to help your dog smell good. Here are some suggestions:
      Aroma Shampoo #1
      To 8 oz of all natural shampoo, add:
      2 drops of Citronella essential oil
      3-4 drops of Lemon essential oil
      7-8 drops of Peppermint essential oil
      These oils not only make your dog smell nice, but can also repel fleas and other annoying bugs.
      Aroma Shampoo #2
      To 8 oz of all natural shampoo, add:
      2 drops of Chamomile essential oil
      2 drops of Geranium essential oil
      7-8 drops of Lavender essential oil
      These oils have soothing and calming effects and are good for relieving itching from skin allergies.
      Alternatively, try these natural products to eliminate "doggie smell":
      Earthbath All Natural Shampoos: The ingredients in these shampoos are natural, and 100% biodegradable. The Mango Tango Shampoo is mild and leaves your dog smelling sweet and exotic! If your dog has skin irritation, the Tea Tree Oil & Aloe Vera Shampoo can speed up healing and relieve itching.
      Earthbath Between Bath Spritzes: These spritzes contain ingredients that are good for the skin - colloidal oatmeal, aloe vera and vitamin E, plus essential oils of either lavender, or vanilla and sweet almond. They are perfect to use to naturally eliminate dog odors between baths.

  45. QUESTION:
    Please some help/advice, fear of doctors and a big problem?
    I have been having an issue with almost passing out or passing out at random.
    Its always the same, and to date I've actually only passed out once. My health insurance...is questionable at best, but I know its not "Healthy" or "Good" to randomly pass out or almost pass out. Not good at all.

    I know I need to see a doctor, and I know I have needed to see one for a while for a few things......however I am very seriously irrationally terrified of doctors. I get shaky and nervous when I see someone in scrubs or even drive by a dr's office or a hospital even a vet's office or an old folks home makes me shake and sick with fear. Its completely idiotic but everyone is afraid of something right?

    I have made a list of things that may conclude into this passing out or near passing out problem, but as far as I know nothing has to be especially wrong with you to pass out, some people do it often others don't. I eat well, I have good blood pressure, I am moderately healthy (Or as healthy as a slightly overweight college sophomore can be)

    I am 21 years old.
    I don't drink.
    I don't smoke anymore.
    I don't eat unnatural sweets (I'm a fruit person...Most of my sugar comes from a small amount used in making sweet tea, and from fruit.)
    I drink more than enough water a day. (About 2-3 1 gallon pitchers of it a day)
    I walk my dogs for an hour and a half a day.
    I do have chronic nightmares (Something else to go to a Dr about)
    I sleep maybe 6 hours every few days before crashing out and sleeping a full 12. (Due to nightmares)

    I am not sure why I have been passing out....I have been having these little....episodes since the beginning of February.

    They all start the same.
    My stomic will start cramping slightly and I will get really really weak.
    Shortly after that my breathing with get ridiculously labored
    I loose a shocking amount of color.
    then after that either my hearing gets really fuzzy like someones yelling from the far end of a tunnel then goes away. or I see black spots or a combination of both.

    Most of the time I can catch myself before I end up passing out. I am very aware of when this happens and either laying down or reclining myself in a chair for a while taking deep breaths then sipping on some water really helps. Its all over in under 10 minutes as far as the unable to breath deafness and spots go. The weakness afterwords has me worried. I literally can't even hold up anything heavier than a cellphone with out my body giving out for up to 3 hours before I get back to normal. after words I am perfectly fine.....

    Originally it was once, maybe twice a week. But now it seems to be happening daily...its getting worse my health insurance won't really cover something like this, I am terrified of doctors and have no idea what to do....I've made the choice to go to a doctor but I can count the number of times I've been to one outside of school physicals on one hand and even then I either went straight to the ER because I let a cold go on too long or was dragged kicking and screaming into the drs office to the best of my ability because my family and friends didn't want to see me sick any longer or felt I should go.

    ...I have no idea at all what could be causing these near passing out problems....My mothers side of the family is rampant with diabetes and Hypoglycemia (Where someones blood sugar spikes and drops at random) and I am thinking that is what is wrong with me...even then I have no idea how to talk to a doctor.....

    Help or advice of any kind is appreciated, the obvious task tackling my phobia is the least of my concerns as far as it goes...I am more worried about how to get my concerns worded to the dr...and get this fixed...
    Thank you.

    I started keeping a food journal because of the family history with diabetes and Hypoglycemia (my mother has it and I picked her up off the floor when her blood sugar would bottom out at random enough to know it.) it doesn't seem to be the blood sugar stuff but I could be wrong. My mum said it sounded like the stuff that happened to her. Would having hypothyroidism affect me negatively when it comes to something like this? I have had to work hard to keep myself active because of an under-active thyroid gland and have been seeing a doctor for my thyroid since I was 9....

    I am calling my doctors office and making an appointment for Tuesday, my boyfriend is going with me to help the doctor decode my fearful bluntness. Its not that I don't know that they are there to help and I can recognize its a childish fear...but it won't go away no matter how much I try.

    When I passed out the one time I truly did pass out I was in the shower and it was for an undetermined a

    • ANSWER:
      Okay, first, take a deep breath. You're in a scary situation right now and the best way to handle this kind of situation is to remain calm and rational.

      I'm a pre-med student and my whole family is in the medical business. So, I'm going to be one of those scary doctors someday. I've done a lot of case studies and have seen and heard of a lot of crazy medical stories. When I first started reading this post, I thought it was just going to be the normal, "You're dehydrated" or "You have orthostatic hypotension". However, you're systems are very concerning. It sounds like there's something going on with your cardiovascular or circulatory system, but it's hard to pin-point without more history and physical examination.

      I know you're scared - but this could be a really serious issue. What if you're driving and suddenly pass out before you can pull over? You have to go to the doctors, and you cannot wait. Take someone you trust with you - it can be your mom, your best friend, anyone. Anyone that makes you feel comforted, calm, and safe. When your doctor first comes into your room, make it clear to him/her that you're scared stiff about medical related stuff but will do the best you can to explain your symptoms. This will let the doctor know you're thinking rationally about the situation without being stubborn. If you have a hard time speaking directly with the doctor, talk to your 'person' you've brought along beforehand and explain all of your symptoms, concerns, and observations you've made about yourself so your 'person' can explain to the doctor for you. If you find yourself getting tongue-tied midsentence, don't worry. Take your time. Your doctor will be concerned for your health and will want you to make sure you're taking your time to say your symptoms and think everything through clearly.

      In the meantime, be keeping tabs on yourself. Pay attention to everything detail. What you eat. If there's a certain time you're more affected by the symptoms. How you recover from an episode. How long from the early onset of the symptoms until you pass out. Everything. If you can, write this down clearly in a journal to give to your doctor to read. Don't be afraid to put your thoughts in there too - no one knows your body better than yourself. Sometimes your emotions and thoughts tell more about your condition than you're aware of - this will help your doctor a lot. Don't picture the doctor as the scary person in the white coat. They're a person just like you. They get sick and scared too. Their place in the world is to discover what's going on in people such as yourself. Remember, they aren't there to hurt you. They're there to heal you.

      Next time you fully pass out, call 911. Sometimes a trip to the emergency room is the fastest way to get answers and it may possibly save your life. When you're at the hospital, whether in the ER or general care, and there hasn't been a given solution to your condition yet, demand an echocardiogram. A lot of times cardiovascular complications will be dismissed as something as simple as a stomach ache. It's really important to make sure your heart is healthy right now - passing out can do a lot of damage to the heart and brain. If there's something going on in your heart, the ECHO should show the problem.

      I hope this helps. Please get yourself checked out soon and stay safe. Update me on how you're doing if you want, okay?

      Take care,

      xxKate

  46. QUESTION:
    Randomly passing out and having a fear of doctors....?
    I have been having an issue with almost passing out or passing out at random.
    Its always the same, and to date I've actually only passed out once. My health insurance...is questionable at best, but I know its not "Healthy" or "Good" to randomly pass out or almost pass out. Not good at all.

    I know I need to see a doctor, and I know I have needed to see one for a while for a few things......however I am very seriously irrationally terrified of doctors. I get shaky and nervous when I see someone in scrubs or even drive by a dr's office or a hospital even a vet's office or an old folks home makes me shake and sick with fear. Its completely idiotic but everyone is afraid of something right?

    I have made a list of things that may conclude into this passing out or near passing out problem, but as far as I know nothing has to be especially wrong with you to pass out, some people do it often others don't. I eat well, I have good blood pressure, I am moderately healthy (Or as healthy as a slightly overweight college sophomore can be)

    I am 21 years old.
    I don't drink.
    I don't smoke anymore.
    I don't eat unnatural sweets (I'm a fruit person...Most of my sugar comes from a small amount used in making sweet tea, and from fruit.)
    I drink more than enough water a day. (About 2-3 1 gallon pitchers of it a day)
    I walk my dogs for an hour and a half a day.
    I do have chronic nightmares (Something else to go to a Dr about)
    I sleep maybe 6 hours every few days before crashing out and sleeping a full 12. (Due to nightmares)

    I am not sure why I have been passing out....I have been having these little....episodes since the beginning of February.

    They all start the same.
    My stomic will start cramping slightly and I will get really really weak.
    Shortly after that my breathing with get ridiculously labored
    I loose a shocking amount of color.
    then after that either my hearing gets really fuzzy like someones yelling from the far end of a tunnel then goes away. or I see black spots or a combination of both.

    Most of the time I can catch myself before I end up passing out. I am very aware of when this happens and either laying down or reclining myself in a chair for a while taking deep breaths then sipping on some water really helps. Its all over in under 10 minutes as far as the unable to breath deafness and spots go. The weakness afterwords has me worried. I literally can't even hold up anything heavier than a cellphone with out my body giving out for up to 3 hours before I get back to normal. after words I am perfectly fine.....

    Originally it was once, maybe twice a week. But now it seems to be happening daily...its getting worse my health insurance won't really cover something like this, I am terrified of doctors and have no idea what to do....I've made the choice to go to a doctor but I can count the number of times I've been to one outside of school physicals on one hand and even then I either went straight to the ER because I let a cold go on too long or was dragged kicking and screaming into the drs office to the best of my ability because my family and friends didn't want to see me sick any longer or felt I should go.

    ...I have no idea at all what could be causing these near passing out problems....My mothers side of the family is rampant with diabetes and Hypoglycemia (Where someones blood sugar spikes and drops at random) and I am thinking that is what is wrong with me...even then I have no idea how to talk to a doctor.....

    Help or advice of any kind is appreciated, the obvious task tackling my phobia is the least of my concerns as far as it goes...I am more worried about how to get my concerns worded to the dr...and get this fixed...

    • ANSWER:
      See a Doctor and stop drinking so much water- very bad for your health.

  47. QUESTION:
    my dog stinks(body stink) and another had real bad breath...can sum1 plz tell me what can i do????

    • ANSWER:
      My dog has a terrible odor! What shampoo will work?
      The first question a vet will have is this -- what is causing the odor? There are a multitude of shampoos out there, but if it isn't a skin or coat problem, shampoo won't help.

      What are the most common causes of doggie odor?
      The first thing to consider is the obvious -- did your dog roll in something (decaying matter, feces) or get sprayed by a skunk? Usually either one of these scenarios is fairly easy to diagnose, and your vet can offer advice on what shampoo would be the best for either situation.

      Why do dogs roll in smelly stuff, anyway?
      Animal behaviorists think it is a way to "scent camouflage" themselves. By rolling in something smelly and perhaps of their intended prey, they won't be detected. I have a "roller" dog, and she just looks like she loves the thrill of new Eau de Dog perfume!

      OK, my dog didn't roll in anything, and did not get sprayed by a skunk. What else could it be?
      Here are just a few possible smell-producing medical problems:

      Breath - some diseases, like kidney failure and Diabetes, can cause a change in breath.
      Diseased teeth and gums - dental disease and infected gums can produce a very foul odor. Additionally, a sore mouth may cause increased drooling. The malodorous saliva can coat the fur, furniture, etc., and you may not recognize that this is originating in the mouth.
      Infected ears - bacterially infected ears are often extremely smelling. A vet can usually smell these ones while they are still in the waiting room. Your dog will usually be scratching or shaking the head, but not always. A bath may make ears worse if water is trapped in the ear canal.
      Flatulence - is the odor on your dog, or from your dog? Flatulence, or "gas" may indicate a dietary or intestinal problem. Some flatulence is normal, but if this is regularly occurring, please see your veterinarian.
      Anal glands/sacs - this is perhaps the most common cause of doggie odor that won't go away. Anal sacs are two small scent-sacs in the area of the anus. These are a type of "marking" glands. When a dog has a bowel movement, these sacs are normally squeeze, and a very smelly, oily secretion is released with the feces.
      If these sacs become infected or impacted (thicker secretion than normal, can't empty properly), problems result. This can be a very painful situation when they become infected! If a dog (or cat) is scared or overly excited, these glands can secrete the smelly, oily substance on the surrounding fur, causing bad odor.

      I have heard about anal sacs - what can be done to ensure that they won't 'leak' or get infected?
      Your veterinarian can show you how to check and even empty the anal sacs at home to prevent problems with odor. Here is an excellent online animation on anal sacs that offers more information on this subject.

      So... to be safe, always consult with your veterinarian if your notice an odd odor or anything "not quite right" with your pet. An ounce of prevention is definitely better than a pound of cure!

  48. QUESTION:
    can i change my grandmother's eating habits?
    my grandma doesn't believe in healthy eating; she says that it's being on satan's diet because he's corrupted our food or whatever. but really, she's getting up in age and i don't want her to die before her time. she doesn't believe me when i show her scientific proof that certain foods are known to cause cancer, diabetes, heart disease etc. it's all just "satan's fault" and all we can do to help anything is "say our blessing and chow down".
    ok like, it's one thing to unhealthy food, but it's another thing to just put fat on top of fat just for the heck of it. but there are very few things that she doesn't smear mayonaise on or drench it in ranch dressing. also, she loves bacon grease; an if pancakes aren't bad enough as is; she has to have them basically deep fried in hot bacon grease. same thing with cornbread and plenty other things. ice cream-has to be high-fat smothered in rich caramel sauce. brownies-have to have some high-fat sourcream, yes, SOUR CREAM, to dip them in. i mean, it's just ridiculous.

    and to make matters worse; she lives with us and influences my little brothers and mom to be this way too. like my 8 year old brother eats all day every day and instead of stopping it, my grandma tells him about the starving kids in africa and warns him that god doesn't like us to waste food . . . blah blah blah . . .

    we've tried buying lower-fat versions of the foods she likes but she got all offended and made us buy her the real deal. i just don't know what else to do. can you teach an old dog new trick so to speak? i mean, this has been her lifestyle for 70 years and change is detestible right? ugh...

    when she walks to the bathroom (6 feet away from her chair) and back, she's really out of breath and it scares me sometimes. i don't want her to die but i don't want to offend her either. should i even bother trying to get her to eat healthy?
    (optional)
    more about my family:
    my grandma's 70, a breast cancer survivor, and about 300+ pounds
    there are 4 little,gullible children in the home, 2 of which are obese already
    then there's me, 16, obese but working on it
    my mom and dad.... are pretty overweight too

    this whole houe needs change come to think of it but it's hard with low income etc etc. but what can i do to help?

    • ANSWER:
      I'd say you need to be an example to all of them. Start eating healthy with lots of whole grains, lean meats, nuts, monounsaturates (good fats), fruits and veggies. I grew up in a working-class family but that doesn't mean you have to eat unhealthy food. Lay off the fast food, start exercising (your local community college probably has a class you can take), and take good care of yourself. Once your family sees how much better you feel from that, they will follow suit. If they don't, don't nag them about it because that will just make them angry. Just try to show them that life is better spent healthily. f they don't catch on, their doctors will.

  49. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with my cat?! Please help?
    My cat, Socks, and I are inseparable. He will be 7 years old this fall. He was diagnosed with feline athsma about 2 ago. The vet put him on prednisone to help him breathe, but it apparently takes a year of his life away with every shot. When he breathes it sounds like he has a stuffy nose, and he has occasional athsma attacks.

    Today I noticed him acting differently. It started this morning when he didn't jump on my bed to wake me up. His brother did, which is abnormal. I didn't even see him all morning. Finally, around noon, I kept calling him and he came trotting down the stairs from some unknown place. He wouldn't eat any treats and he keeps coughing. His breath smells 10x worse than usual, and he is breathing out of his mouth. He also feels weaker when I hold him. I will definitely take him to the vet asap, but do you know anything from personal experience that could help me? Is he okay?
    ...one of you mentioned the steriods. I chose to give them to him because I would rather him have a short happy life than a long life of suffering. BUT u said that it weakens his immune system...so technically that would just make him have worse attacks and have a harder time overcoming them? Should I stop giving them to him? What is your opinion?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you know what causes Socks' asthma attacks? Feline asthma, or feline allergic bronchitis, is triggered by pollens or other airborne allergens. I don't know what tests your vet did to determine the cause of his attacks or what precautions he/she suggested around the home. I have found through the years that some vets are happy to answer any/all questions you have about your pet's diagnosis and treatment, and some only tell you what they want you to know and send you home confused and bewildered. My attitude is my cats and dog are my babies and I want to understand everything possible about their illnesses. The vet hospital I go to now knows I will have a barrage of questions!

      I have done some quick reading in my cat care library and I hope this is not information you already know. One of the biggest culprits is the dust from clay kitty litter and 'The Cat Bible' by Tracie Hotchner, suggested Feline Pine (compressed wood) or The World's Best Kitty Litter (ground corn). I will add to that Swheat, which is what I use (ground wheat). I have a kitty that was prone to urinary tract infections aggravated by the dust from clay litter and she hasn't had a flare up since I changed litters.

      The other allergens listed include cigarette smoke, vapors and fumes from household cleaning products, and household dust. Let me add to this list the fragrance and smoke from burning candles, the perfume or cologne you or family members wear, scented air fresheners (sprayed or plug-ins), scented carpet fresheners and scented laundry products. I have a dog that has allergies and I cannot use any scented products in our home.

      Now to your question, if Socks is breathing though his mouth, he is congested and he has constriction in his lungs. From what I read, this is an emergency and you should seek the advice of his vet. I have not treated a kitty with asthma, so I don't know any at home tricks and I am not going to make any guessed suggestions.

      Prednisone, which is a steroid, is what many vets give for many allergic type reactions. Again, I don't know what information your vet has given you, but one of the side effects of prolonged steroid use is the chance of diabetes developing. I know this from volunteering with my vet. The vet can do a simple blood glucose test in the office to make sure it is not elevated. There may be other side effects, too, that affect the other functions of the body, such as liver and kidneys.

      As for the bad breath, it could be from the inflammation in his lungs from the asthma or other causes such as dental problems, diabetes or kidney problems.

      I see you plan to take Socks to his vet. I am so glad and I hope he gets relief so he can breathe.

      I have attached some websites with more information about feline asthma. One of the things I read about were inhalers like asthmatic people use and there is a company called Aerokat that has developed a cone shaped mask to use inhalers with kitties. If Socks was my kitty, I would ask the vet about this.

      I have also attached the link to a Yahoo Group for Feline Asthma caretakers. Support groups can be a wealth of information and moral support when dealing with a chronic illness. I belonged to the feline diabetes and the CRF groups for my kitties when I was treating them. It can be a relief to 'talk' to someone who is dealing with the same issues you are with your kitty.

      I hope Socks is feeling better soon.

      Purrs to you, Socks and brother kitty.

  50. QUESTION:
    10+ Hours of sleep and still tired every day just had blood test can this be severe allergies?
    Hi,

    I have felt run down for the past 2 weeks or so. I have been getting between 9 and 12 hours of sleep each night, and when I wakeup, I feel as if I need to sleep more. During the day, I feel as if I need to nap (and I sometimes do), and I often feel as if I don't have enough energy to do normal activities.

    Last year, an allergist said I am allergic to grass pollen... and I have a dog that walks/rolls in the grass and sleeps near me which does not help...

    For the past two weeks, in addition tot he severe fatigue, I have felt weak/achy, I have had the chills on and off, I feel as if I have a tickle/slight cough in my throat, and I have shortness of breath (especially when trying to lift weights or also when doing regular activities sometimes like jogging where this never happened).

    Everything just came back normal from my blood test. The doctor is shrugging it off, and I really do not know what to do. Can some/all of these be severe allergies? Wouldn't my white blood cells be elevated then? What can I do and what can this be? Who can I see and talk to?

    Would a bad cold/virus cause this and could that last for 2 weeks?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      From what I know there are a few main things that can cause this.. Are you over Weight? eating fast food all the time or living on energy drinks will make you pay in the long run.. Also if you don't have a routine our body gets out of wak.. Diabetes can cause this as well but I would guess that they would have found that on the blood test.. Another big one is that a good friend of mine was feeling the same way and couldn't find out what was wrong.. ( not to scare you but inform you ) he soon found out that he had colon cancer.. sorry bud but its always to get things checked out before they go to far.. your only got one body so its ok to be persisitent with the doctors when you know something is not right, remember there not God so I would look for another opinion.

does diabetes cause bad breath dogs

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