Post Nasal Drip And Bad Breath Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How can you get rid of a post nasal drip and stop bad breath caused by it?
    Ive got an annoying post nasal drip that makes me have bad breath sometimes. I brush 2 timess a day and thouroghly (tong ets), I use mouth wash and i chew gum alot. I also drink lots of water etc! Yet bad breath still creeps back! HOW CAN I STOP IT!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Kalin,

      Have you tried using a nasal-sinus irrigator? It just takes a few minutes a day and will probably be the most effective treatment for you. It will flush out your nasal passageways. That in combination with good oral care (brushing your teeth 2-3 times a day and using a mouthwash) should help. A lot of medications may give you dry mouth which causes bad breath, although they can definitely be helpful too.

      You can read more information about Post Nasal Drip and how to fix it here: http://www.therabreath.com/art_postnasaldrip.asp. The article offers extensive tips and suggests some products that should be able to help you.

      Something else you may want to try is an oral care probiotic. There’s a really good site that has tons of information on probiotics here: www.proprobiotics.com

      I hope this helps!

  2. QUESTION:
    Are there any longterm treatments for allergies?
    I have to take allegra D everyday or else I get post nasal drip which leads to sore throats, and I can't sleep at night because I feel congested and can't breath. I don't like having to take allergy medicine everyday, but it's the only way I can breathe it seems like. Are there any long term treatments for people with congestion?

    • ANSWER:
      You can get allergy shots, but those take years. I had 4 years of allergy shots and they only worked for about 5 years, after which my allergies got worse than they had been before.

      Talk to your doctor, you might be able to get on a different prescription that's a bit cheaper. But Allegra is what I used to be on by prescription before it went OTC.

      I have SEVERE allergies that are actually crippling (I get daily migraines). Unfortunately, the long term treatment is pills. There are different ones out there though.

  3. QUESTION:
    Why does my throat feel really tight and tingly when I stand?
    If I sit for long enough this feeling settles a lot, but if I move around my throat and upper chest get really tight and I start finding it difficult to breath, exspecially when I breath out. I have had this feeling for the last couple days now and had it last year. What is it and how can I treat it?

    • ANSWER:
      Sinus problems probably could be the cause. This is the time of year for all sorts of allergies. One year I had a post nasal drip that was so bad it got stuck in my throat and made it feel tight like I swallowed something I shouldn't have. I went to a general dr for treatment and they were puzzled by it. They even x-rayed my throat to make sure I didn't swallow something whole. then they treated me for anxiety. Anyway, I went to ear, nose, and throat dr next because if it has to do with my throat they would know. Turned out to be really bad sinus problems. I was told to take mucenex (to get the mucus up) and flonase (to stop the mucus production). Please note though that I am not a dr and what was correct for me may not be correct for you.

  4. QUESTION:
    If cough serves as a protective reflex against foreign material and as a method to clear secretions from?
    from the airway why we buy medicaments to stop it.Why Cough is good and bad in the same time?

    • ANSWER:
      That's why if I have a cough from chest congestion I don't buy a cough suppressant, I buy an expectorant. The only expectorant I know of is guiffanessin. It thins and loosens the mucus. It's in robitussin and mucinex. Caffeine or minty steam treatments can help open the airways to make it easier to breath. But sometimes the cough is just from the tickle in your throat from post nasal drip or fluid in the ears and can be really annoying, then you may want a cough suppressant.

  5. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a thyroid problem?
    I've already asked a thyroid question, but the only answer i got was that i didn't list enough symptoms. My mother wants me to get checked out by a doctor and i would like to know if i have any symptoms i didn't know was associated with a thyroid problem. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold and/or heat, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The physical examination often reveals the hair to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight, but may also be underweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow even though the patient is not a well-trained athlete.

      If the average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit, then the diagnosis of a low functioning thyroid system is likely. An average temperature above 98.2 is considered high and might reflect a hyperthyroid condition.

      Need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH should be .3 – 3 but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse ...OR Graves Disease (hypER).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. May have to go to more than one before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  6. QUESTION:
    What could be causing my husbands scalp pain and shooting pains in his ear?
    It started with sudden allergy or sinus then quickly developed into an earache and he can't even brush his hair without it hurting. Can this all be connected to his sinus?

    • ANSWER:
      sounds like a sinus infection

      Sinus symptoms are very common during a cold or the flu, but in most cases they are due to the effects of the infecting virus and resolve when the infection does. It is important to differentiate between inflamed sinuses associated with cold or flu virus and sinusitis caused by bacteria.

      The signs and symptoms that are associated with the diagnosis of sinusitis include one to two of the following:

      Nasal congestion and discharge that typically is thick and becomes yellowish to yellow-green
      Facial pain, pressure, congestion, or fullness (that is also accompanied by other symptoms of sinusitis)
      Symptoms that continue for 10 days or more after the start of a cold or flu
      Symptoms worsen after 5 - 7 days, or return after initial improvement in a cold (called double sickening)
      Reduced or absent sense of smell
      Fever, although should also be accompanied by other symptoms of sinusitis
      Other symptoms of sinusitis that usually occur in adults include one to two of the following:

      Eyes may be red, bulging, or painful if the sinus infection occurs around the eyes
      A persistent cough (particularly during the day)
      Ear pain, pressure, or fullness
      Halitosis (bad breath)
      Dental pain
      Fatigue
      However, many studies have shown that symptoms used to diagnose sinusitis often do not predict prognosis or response to antibiotic treatment.

      Sneezing, sore throat, and muscle aches may be present, but they are rarely caused by sinusitis itself. Muscle aches may be caused by fever, sore throat by post-nasal drip, and sneezing from cold or allergies.

      Rare complications of sinusitis can produce additional symptoms, which may be severe or even life threatening.

      Symptoms Indicating Medical Emergency
      Increasing severity of symptoms
      Swelling and drooping eyelid
      Loss of eye movement (possible orbital infection, which is in the eye socket)
      Vision changes
      Pupil fixed or dilated
      Symptoms spreading to both sides of face (may indicate blood clot)
      Development of severe headache, altered vision
      Mild personality or mental changes (may indicate spread of infection to brain)
      A soft swelling over the bone (may indicate bone infection)
      Persistent nasal discharge (of any type) and day time cough for more than 10 days, or
      Severe symptoms last for at least 3 - 4 days in a row and include thick, greenish nasal discharge plus a fever of at least 102° F

      Other symptoms

      Irritability
      Vomiting
      Gagging on mucus
      Cough
      Chronic Sinusitis
      Recurrent acute and chronic sinusitis tend to take the following course:

      Any of the sinusitis symptoms listed previously may be present
      Symptoms are more vague and generalized than acute sinusitis
      Fever may be absent or just low grade
      Symptoms of sinusitis last 12 weeks or longer
      Symptoms occur throughout the year, even during nonallergy seasons
      Site-Specific Symptoms
      Specific symptoms may indicate which sinus is involved.

      Frontal sinusitis causes:

      Pain across the lower forehead.
      Symptoms are worse when lying on the back
      Maxillary sinusitis causes:

      Pain over the cheeks that may travel to the teeth
      Hard palate in the mouth sometimes becomes swollen
      Symptoms are worse when head is upright
      Ethmoid sinusitis causes:

      Pain behind the eyes and sometimes redness and tenderness in the area across the top of the nose
      Symptoms are worse when coughing, straining, or lying on the back
      Sphenoid sinusitis:

      Rarely occurs by itself; when it does, the pain may be felt behind the eyes, across the forehead, or in the face
      Symptoms are worse when lying on the back or bending forward
      Other Causes of Sinusitis Symptoms
      It is often difficult to tell when a viral infection converts to a bacterial infection. Studies have found that 40 - 85% of patients with the common cold show signs of inflamed sinuses on x-rays or CT scans. A cold, however, unlike sinusitis, typically clears up without treatment within a week. (Only about 0.5 - 2% of adults with viral colds or flus actually develop bacterial infections.)

      Allergies. Symptoms of both sinusitis and allergic rhinitis include nasal obstruction and congestion. The conditions often occur together. People with allergies and no sinus infection may have:

      Thin, clear, and runny nasal discharge
      Itchy nose, eyes, or throat (do not occur with bacterial sinusitis)

  7. QUESTION:
    Has anyone used nasal sinus drops by doctor Katz?
    Just wondering if anyone has a success story from using this. I seem to have bad breath from post nasal drip and s'one recommended this product.
    Has anyone got any other success story of getting rid of badbreath from the nasal cavity and what did you use?
    I've tried almost everything, nasal irrigation, hydrogen peroxide, apple cider, acidophilus, baking soda, tongue scraper you name it. I know now that the badbreath is definately not coming from my mouth. Help anyone???

    • ANSWER:
      Are you talking this stuff?
      http://www.therabreath.com/about/index.asp ??
      It's not likely too many people outside the US West Coast would have tried it, I'd think, but you never know.

      Meantime I've got to ask how come you're using scatter-gun treatment methods here, and what are you trying to cure? Have you had a proper assessment by an ear, nose and throat specialist? If so, I would have thought you might also have tried prescription antihistamines and/or decongestants, or something like sodium chromoglycate, and have found relief from your PND by now.
      If it's just bad breath, not over-productive sinuses or infected sinuses you have, when's the last time you had a dentist/orthodontist give you a good check-up? You're SURE it's not coming from your mouth?
      Sorry - just a lot of dumb questions. :-/

  8. QUESTION:
    Something homeopathic for stuffy nose and sore throat?
    I have had a sore throat for about 3 days, and a stuffy nose, is there anything I can do to make it easier for me to breath a night? I can't breath throgh my mouth, it's annoying.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Treatment(s) for Influenza/Cold :-

      Head remedy; restlessness with prostration and excessive thirst at short intervals Arsenic Album 30, 4 hourly

      Intercurrent remedy Influenzinum 200 and Sulphur 200, 4 hourly

      Early stage with chill and sneezing; heaviness and tiredness of body and limbs; loss of thirst, bursting headache; relief from passing large quantities of pale urine Gelsemium 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Severe pains in limbs and back; bones feel 'broken', bursting headache; shivering,and chills in back; eyeballs sore Eupatorium Perf 30 or 200, 3 hourly

      Rapid prostration; high fever, gastric symptoms; dull red face, nervousness Kali Phos.6X or 30, 4 hourly

      With dry, hacking cough; headache is worse after least movement; wants to lie still and alone; better by pressure, tongue is coated white; great thirst Bryonia Alba 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Patient very chilly; feels cold even in bed; least movement or exposure intensifies the sensation of cold; fresh shivering and chill after drinking; aching in limbs and back; nose stuffed up at night Nux Vomica 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Severe pains in back and thighs; chilliness, no fire or heat can warm up the patient; rapid pulsation with temperature not proportionately high; restlessness; violent pulsations; bruised feeling all over Pyrogenium 200, 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Cold/Catarrh/Coryza :-

      1st Stage :-

      Icy coldness of whole body; internal and external both.
      To give heat to the system Camphor 6X or 30, 1/2 hourly

      Cold due to sudden exposure to dry cold wind; chilly feeling; headache, watering of eyes and sneezing;a nxiety and fear; feverish feeling Aconite 30 or 200, 2 hourly

      Running of nose during day and blockage at night with chilly feeling Nux vomica 30, 3 hourly

      Cold with sneezing and profuse from eyes and nose; worse in warmth and indoor; better in open air Allium Cepa 30, 3 hourly

      Dryness of nose with headache; worse from motion; thirst more; lips parched and dry; stools constipated Bryonia 30 or 200, 3 hourly

      Sneezing; watering of nose and eyes; throat sore with constant desire to swallow saliva; foul smell from mouth; feverish feeling with sweat which do not relieve. Worse at night Mercurius Sol 30 3 hourly

      Watering and burning of eyes with streaming nose; acrid discharges Euphrasia 30, 3 hourly

      Chilly feeling though face is hot; restlessness; unquenchable thirst, drinks often but little at a time; better hot drinks Arsenic Album 30, 3 hourly

      Acrid discharge from the nose which corrodes the upper lip. Nose filled with phelgm; breathes through the mouth Arum Triph 30, 3 hourly

      Cold; running of nose and sneezing; redness and pain forehead; watering eyes Sabadilla 30, 4 hourly

      Cold;pain throat; red face, rush of blood towards head Belladonna 30, 4 hourly

      Aching pain; dullness; chilliness in back; sneezing; bland and thick discharge from nose; feverish; better by passing urine Gelsemium 30, 3 hourly

      Coryza with sneezing and aching in bones of extremities with soreness of flesh Eup Perf 30, 3 hourly

      Cold; better from cold bathing Calcarea Sulph 30, 4 hourly

      Dripping of nose while eating Trombidium 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      Dripping of nose while going to sleep Thuja Occ 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      Dry coryza; sniffles of infants, blockage of nose Sambucus Nig 30, 4 hourly

      2nd Stage :-

      Discharge from nose; yellowish or greenish; stringy Kali Bich 30, 4 hourly

      Greenish yellow mucous from nose; loss of taste and thirst; better open air Pulsatilla 30, 4 hourly

      Thick yellow discharge from nose; post nasal cattarh; constipation Hydrastis Can 30, 4 hourly

      Watering from nose like a tap; thirst more; stools constipated; cold aggravates till noon and ameliorates after noon Natrum Mur 30 (in acute stage Bryonia 30), 4 hourly

      In fat and flabby patient; worse after bathing; chilly patient Calcarea Carb.200, 6 hourly

      Watery discherge from the nose and finally it becomes thick, yellow. Pain in the throat on swallowing as if full of splinters; sensitive to cold Hepar Sulph 30, 4 hourly

      Cold worse early morning; chronic; dry catarrh; aversion to take bath Sulphur 200 weekly (3 Doses)

      Chronic catarrh; dry coryza, with blockage of nose; worse change of weather and cold Psorinum 200 weekly (3 Doses)

      Chronic cases with tubercular history Tuberculinum k 200 or 1M, fortnightly (6 Doses)

      Obstinate chronic cases when indicated remedy fails Bacillinum 1M, weekly (3 Doses) .

      Choose the remedy which is most similar to the patients symptoms, Do not try to mix or exceed the given dosage or remedy. No side effects or complications if taken as directed above.

      Take Care and God Bless You !

  9. QUESTION:
    what are the symptoms of thyroid disease?
    how can one find out if she/he has thyroid disease?

    • ANSWER:
      Well here are some...............
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.

      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      For second question - you have to find a doctor that is knowledgeable about the thyroid...this is not easy.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  10. QUESTION:
    What can I do about bad breath?
    My dentist says I don't have gingivitis although my breath is very bad and nothing helps - also have dry mouth. Does anyone have any suggestions.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to determine the cause before you select a treatment. Many people who are mouth breathers have bad breath. Also, if you have sinus problems, post nasal drip can give you bad breath. In that case, you'd want to deal with the sinus issues. Smokers have bad breath and it doesn't just come from their mouth, it comes up from their lungs. If you don't eat you can get bad breath. Once you figure out what's causing it, it should be easy to correct.

      Edit: If you rinse your mouth with peroxide as one person suggested, make sure it's only a 3 - 3 1/2% solution......no stronger!!.......or you can create more problems than you're trying to correct!

  11. QUESTION:
    What were your hypothyroidism symptoms?
    I know what websites like Web MD and Mayo Clinic say about the typical symptoms, but I was wondering if anyone has any details about their specific process of experiencing symptoms & getting diagnosed?

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.

      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      Have you had your thyroid tested? You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  12. QUESTION:
    Did you get really pale skin with hypothyroidism?
    I recently found out I have hypothyroidism I noticed my skin has recently (last 6 months) got really really pale. You can see a lot of my veins especially in my thighs and legs, did anyone else notice this? I know the "common" symptoms and signs of hypo but what were some uncommon ones you noticed? Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Yes!

      Here are some of the possibles:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.
      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.
      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      There are even more than these....the thyroid, like the heart, effects everything in your body!

      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  13. QUESTION:
    What is cat allergy and symptoms?
    can it ever be deadly?

    my skin itches and gets red after a while when i hold my kittens or be around them and i also feel like i cant breath and there's pressure to my heart... do these mean i have cat allergy and this is just basic now but can it get worse and more serious, even cause death?

    • ANSWER:
      Cat allergies... you will need to see an allergist if you have a cat or are frequently exposed to cats. I recommend seeing an allergist because even if you aren't around cats, you'll be restricting homes you can visit for no good reason (unless you don't have health insurance... that's a good reason).

      I have serious allergies (cat, dog, pollen, trees, grass, and dust) so I am somewhat an authority. Allergic reactions in general (including those to cats) include the following - from bothersome to severe...

      - itchy eyes, sinuses, ears, and skin
      - mucous in the eyes, mouth, and sinuses
      - sneezing to chronic sneezing
      - post nasal drip/sore throat
      - hives (itchy bumps/rash)
      - breathing difficulties
      - athsma (I distinguish the two because one can be annoying, the other can be alarming)
      - anaphalaxis (swelling of the throat)
      - death from the latter if not caught in time

      My mother had anaphalaxis to our cat, Gizmo, and fortunately she only spent two weeks in the hospital. It took a while to get that bad because we had him for a while... he was a good cat. My cat allergies didn't hit until about 2 years ago. I had to go to the doctor and was tested (it's more bothersome than extremely painful and it is quick), ergo the above allergies.

      I go in for weekly allergy shots which have been helpful. Allergy shots boost your immune system by introducing the allergens into you system at a low dosage. This causes the immune system to learn to fight the allergens better. As you progress, they increase the dosages. It has been totally worth my while to do this. A good allergist will re-test you about a 1/3 of the way through the treatments to make sure you're responding properly and not wasting your time and $.

      Take good care,
      Sense

  14. QUESTION:
    How would I know if I had "Post Nasal Drip"?
    how would I go about Diagnosing myself? And I dont have medical insurance at the moment so going to the Doctors is not an option.

    I have a lot of mucus in my throat (since my childhood days), but nothing serious.

    • ANSWER:
      Post Nasal Drip is just an excess of mucus that collects in the back of the throat. It could be due to many things. Excessive colds, poor drainage system, certain medications, allergies, acid reflux or even the weather (usually arid, humid, dry or hot). There are a lot of signs and symptoms of Post Nasal Drip.

      Here are a few:
      Difficulty breathing
      Spitting/Swallowing/Coughing
      Sore throat
      Cracked Voice
      Feeling the need to constantly clear your throat

      Mainly, you feel like there's something in your throat. Usually, it feels like a lump and it can be annoying but nothing really major that you could die from.

      One major problem you may have with Post Nasal Drip is bad breath because you can't get rid of the mucus in the back of your throat.

      Treatment can include Benadryl or Sudafed. Anti-histamines and Decongestants. Also, stay away from dairy. Drink lots and lots of water. Maybe use a humidifier. Don't drink too much caffeine or alcohol but tea can be very good. Also, the sauna or shower steam is a good place to clear up those sinuses. Or you can just boil some water.

      And you're right. Post Nasal Drip is not life threatening but it can be really annoying, especially if you're a singer or need to speak a lot. Hope this helps!

  15. QUESTION:
    Can you identify this medical condition?
    For at least TEN years, my dad has been constantly coughing up phlegm (lots of different colors) and just coughing in general. It has worried my family for a long time and we have no idea what he has. He has never liked going to the doctor's and isn't going any time soon.

    His sickness is not contagious but it is affecting every part of his life.

    What should we do?

    By the way, he also has asthma.

    • ANSWER:
      Coughing is a symptom, not a disease. It is the underlying cause of the cough that needs to be treated.

      You should consult your doctor if any of the following symptoms accompany a cough, so that possible underlying causes can be investigated and treated where necessary:

      coughing up phlegm that is green, rusty brown, yellow, blood-stained or foul smelling
      chest pain
      shortness of breath or wheezing
      pain and swelling in the calf
      recurrent night-time cough
      whooping cough or croup
      worsening smoker’s cough
      sudden weight loss
      fever and sweating
      hoarseness of the voice with a chronic cough that doesn’t clear up spontaneously.
      If you can't cough but need to, problems soon arise. Equally, when coughing is painful (for example, because of a broken rib), patients try not to cough and this can be dangerous.

      Ineffective clearance of the airway can lead to a chest infection and possible pneumonia. In these circumstances, pain-relieving medicine can be useful to permit an efficient cough.

      Here is a webstie i founf that could help you!; http://www.healthboards.com/boards/showthread.php?t=546382

      Here i found an exelent website with a quetion similar to yours;
      Q:Can a cough originate from a problem somewhere other than the lungs? I am being treated for a cough that won’t go away. It has lasted since November 2006. Two rounds of chest X-rays have come back clear. The doctor prescribed antibiotics three different times—prednisone, Musinex (which loosens phlegm), and cough syrup with codeine—but the cough persists. Please help.

      A: Your hunch is right. Coughs are symptoms that may be caused by other factors (post-nasal drip, medication, etc.) besides the lungs. Given that yours has persisted for so many months, it is extremely important to find the source: It may be masking another condition (heart, sinus, gastro-esophageal reflux) that is impacting the quality of your life. Fortunately, the underlying cause can often be found and successfully treated.

      Coughing is one of the most common reasons why Americans visit their health care providers. While occasional coughing helps the lungs clear out particles or other substances that can lead to infection, persistent coughing can lead to side effects such as painful spasms, fatigue, hoarseness, or even urine leakage. Needless to say, this problem can be embarrassing as well as life-altering.

      In order to find the reason for a cough, we often ask whether it just began (acute) or has been going on for eight or more weeks (chronic in adults). We then want to know whether it is productive or non-productive, infectious (pneumonia, whooping cough, influenza, others) or non-infectious (asthma or a cough triggered by gastro-esophageal reflux disease or GERD, heart disease, others).

      If your cough is productive, you will cough up phlegm. This is basically mucus being expelled out of the lungs and through your mouth. Sometimes this mucus is clear or has a slight tinge of color. In many cases this type of cough is caused by a virus or, less commonly, a bacterial infection. At other times the phlegm will be a dark yellow, green, gray (especially in smokers), or even have a blood-tinged color. This is even more concerning, especially if you have a fever. This could mean you have a serious bacterial infection, and it would be best to see your health care provider.

      If you have a non-productive or dry cough, it may seem like you have something to cough up, but nothing comes out. Common reasons for these coughs include viruses, asthma, emphysema, congestive heart failure, or even something much worse—lung cancer.

      Most of our coughs are triggered by one of the following conditions:

      Asthma: Many people have asthma and don't know it. This is important because it can be the main source of a cough. Treatment with cough suppressants is not only ineffective, but can be potentially dangerous because the condition can worsen. Other medical approaches (inhalers, oral medications) are needed.

      Post-nasal drip: Post-nasal drip syndrome can lead to extra mucus dripping down from the sinuses into the throat, which then tickle the cough sensors in the tubes leading into our lungs. Some people have a silent drip and aren’t even aware it is occurring. But silent or not, the result can be a real annoying outburst of uncontrollable coughing.

      Gastroesophageal reflux disease: You may ask, how acid reflux can cause a cough? Well, the reason is that stomach acid can “backwash" up into our esophagus, where there are nerve endings that can trigger a cough. Sometimes a cough caused by GERD is a difficult diagnosis to make because, in many cases, a persistent cough may be the only symptom.

      Viruses: Did you ever have a cough that wouldn't give up, especially after you had a cold or the flu? The reason for the persistence of the cough is often due to inflammation that was caused by the virus. This inflammation keeps on irritating the nerve receptors in your bronch

  16. QUESTION:
    What exactly are tonsil stones (tonsilloliths) and how do I get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Here is some info I found on websites:

      Tonsil Stones are irregularly shaped, whitish/yellow, foul-smelling globs of mucus and bacteria that get caught in the back of the throat. They form in the tonsil crypts which are simply small pockets or divots that appear in everyone's tonsils. The scientific name for these white globs is tonsilloliths.

      It is only recently that the oral care community has begun to understand what these white spots actually are - many people have reported that their dentist told them that they were just extra food debris, which is not true!

      These tonsillar stones don't do any physical harm, and sporadically coughing them up doesn't mean that there is anything wrong with you. However, they can be annoying (who wants to cough one up while they are kissing someone?), and sometimes they are an indication that you have bad breath.

      If you have ever broken open a tonsil stone, then you know that they smell absolutely terrible! The smell is actually caused by a combination of volatile sulfur compounds(methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide), post nasal drip, and bacteria.

      They will only form in people who still have their tonsils; however, that does not mean that you should run out and get your tonsils removed! Not too long ago, they were routinely removed for being swollen and inflamed. What was not understood then was that the tonsils' sole purpose is to prevent organisms and bacteria from traveling deeper in the throat.

      Tonsilloliths are not something that you have to live with - there are various treatments to get rid of them, without having your tonsils removed (which can be dangerous as people get older).

      Tonsillectomies are surgical procedures for removing tonsils. They are not necessary for tonsil stones; there are much easier methods for solving this problem. To get rid of tonsil stones, you may just need to gargle with warm salt water combined with lime juice. You can also squeeze your throat or use a syringe to dislodge them. However, some people may have a recurring problem, but they can use home remedies which normally take care of the tonsilloliths. Laser surgery may be needed for extreme cases, so be sure to consult your doctor if the problem is persistent.

  17. QUESTION:
    What is having high Thyroid problems?
    What causes it? What are the symptoms? What do you do to cure it? What did I do to get it in the first place?

    • ANSWER:
      'high thyroid'? What do you mean? I will assume you mean high TSH meanig low producing thyroid ... HypOthyroidism, as it is by far, the most common of the two. There is no cure.

      These are just possibles and you would not have to have all of them:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.
      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.
      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      God bless you

  18. QUESTION:
    Any cures, treatment, home remedies for bad breath due to allergies?
    My son is having this problem and he is self concious so it is bothering him socially

    • ANSWER:
      Aside from brushing, flossing, etc, have him use a saline nasal spray or netty pot. They're sold over the counter in pharmacys and they aren't medicine, just sterile salt water to irrigate your sinuses.
      Bad breath from allergies can be caused by post nasal drip, so this will probably help a lot. Also, make sure he's drinking adequate water, because if the mucus gets dried out, it can get stuck in his sinuses and cause bad breath.

  19. QUESTION:
    Best homeopathic treatment for chronic persistent bad breath?
    Does anyone know of a proven remedy for bad breath, I,ve been suffering for 8 yrs and it has completely ruined my life. I,ve tried acid refulx meds, expensive thera breath system and have gone to several dentist and doctors and have been told that my mouth is clean dont have any diseases and they dont know why it is happening. I have deviated septum and my left nostril inside is blocked due to the swolen/deviated septum.

    • ANSWER:
      Hmmmm .. Homeopathic remedies (Multiple treatments are given in the end: choose the one that matches your symptoms the most)

      Take these precautions first:

      * Proper cleaning or brushing of the teeth in the morning and at bedtime

      * Clear saliva and nasal secretion often and avoid accumulations

      * Hawk to clear the throat often, if there is throat infection or secretions

      * Dental check-ups for filling pockets or erosions if any, or to rule out any other dental or gum problem
      * Clean the tongue properly with tongue scraper if there is coating

      * Drink plenty of water or drinks to maintain good body hydration. Also take plenty of water after every meal to wash away the presence of food particles in the mouth or throat or oesophagus

      * Clean dentures (if any) properly with antiseptic solutions

      Avoid:

      * Stimulants such as alcohol, cigarettes and chewing tobacco

      * Dairy products

      * Onions and garlic

      * Sweets or chocolates

      Diagnosis of the complaint should be done in different ways to attain complete analysis for getting complete cure. The tests often required may be

      * Endoscopy for the sinuses

      * CT scan to rule out nasal obstruction, lung disorders, etc.

      * Blood investigations to rule out diabetes, infection, allergies, metabolic disorders

      * Urine investigations to rule out diabetes, ketone bodies and metabolic disorders

      Treatment: For temporary relief, anyone can use

      * Cleanser, paste, mouthwash, mouth freshener or deodorant, gargles, tongue cleaner or wiper, etc.

      * Chewing gum which influences secretion of saliva

      * Cloves, cardamom, camphor, nutmeg, green pudhina leaves or guava leaves or betel leaves for masking the foul odour

      Sometimes even doctors do give the same advice, but mouthwashes and deodorants are generally cosmetic and do not have a long-lasting effect on bad breath. Antibacterial and antiseptic preparations act for some more time than maskers like deodorants or chewing gums. Antibiotic treatment also will work for the time being only.

      Homeopathic approach to halitosis - Everyone can notice that use of mouth freshener works only for the time being. Removing the actual cause or disease can only help in the long run. Treatment will be successful only when we find and remove the actual cause and treat the condition i.e. treat infection, sinusitis, lung infection, post-nasal drip, chronic bronchitis, etc.

      Regarding treatment of halitosis in Homeopathy, there are different types of odours which mimic fermented beer, brandy, cabbage, cheese, chicken dung, putrid, fish brine, garlic, sulphur, tobaccos, cadaver, earth, rotten eggs, sour taste, sole leather, garlic, metallic, musty, onions, etc., i.e., odour differs from person to person depending upon the bacteria. Likewise, prescription also differs in Homeopathy from person to person. So, each patient is treated separately i.e., individually.

      Homeopathic medicines can act as mouth wash, can remove the disease completely, and can act neurologically and stimulate the body for quality normal secretions. Treatment should be given for the complaints like recurrent cold, sinusitis, dental problems, gingivitis, stomatitis, indigestion, etc. Evidence shows that the messenger for wellness - Homeopathy - has gained in importance in the tide of health fortunes and has made the world turn towards it with its fragrance of cure.

      Homeopathic medicines commonly used in the case of offensive breath are - Asafoetida, Baptisia, Baryta mur, Benzoic acid, Bromium, Calc carb, carbolic acid, Carbo animalis, Carbo veg, Crot - hor, Graphites, Hepa sulf, Kali sulp, Merc sol, Nat sulp, Nit acid, Opium, Plantago, Psorinum, Pulsatilla, Rhus tox, Sepia, Silicea, Staphysagria, Sulphur, Tarentula, Tellurium, Thuja, Tuberculinum (http://abchomeopathy.com/r.php/Tub), etc.

  20. QUESTION:
    i have frequent tonsil stones is that bad?
    i have frequent tonsil stones and i was wondering if that was a bad thing. i do also have post nasal drip. thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Are you talking about "Tonsiloliths"?

      If so here is info on it:
      What are tonsiloliths? Some people notice that they have small white hard lumps in the back of the throat in the tonsil region. The lumps range in size from quite tiny to pea size and they tend to remain lodged in the tonsillar area for some time, until they eventually become dislodged. They are often associated with a bad smell coming from the tonsil area, and may create the physical sensation of having something lodged in the back of the throat.

      Tonsiloliths are accumulations of dead skin cells and other cellular and noncellular debris that wash down the back of the throat from the sinuses and nasal cavities. People who suffer from post nasal drip often have tonsiloliths because they have a regular flow of mucus and sinus drainage past the tonsils. The little stones occur in the tonsillar crypts because this is one place where material can become lodged. Because they contain abundant protein, they provide a fertile place for bacteria to flourish, particularly the anaerobic bacteria that live on the back of the tongue and in other airless places in the mouth. The growth and metabolism of these bacteria produce bad breath from tonsils - halitosis.

      Tonsiloliths, sometimes also referred to as tonsil stones, can be very difficult to get rid of. Though the individual stones eventually become dislodged and get swallowed, more will soon begin to form. Individuals who have had their tonsils removed usually do not suffer from tonsiloliths, but tonsillectomy is not a recommended treatment for the problem: remedies are best directed at the bad breath from tonsils as this is the most troublesome symptom.

      The odor that emanates as bad breath from tonsils is caused by sulfur compounds produced by bacteria. The bacteria live and multiply in and on the tonsil stones, thus they will not be affected much by brushing the teeth or tongue, or rinsing the mouth with antibacterial mouthwashes. Breath sprays and mints are also likely to be ineffective. The best approach is to gargle regularly with a good mouthwash that is designed to reduce the numbers of anaerobic bacteria in the mouth. This will not only reduce the odor, it may also help to dislodge the tonsil stones.

      Hope this helped!

      Me............<3

  21. QUESTION:
    what is the treatment for halitosis for other than dental problem?

    • ANSWER:
      yea! it could be caused by other problems... for example, you dont eat, and your stomach full with gas, and it comes out of your mouth because you dont eat anything and it causes bad breath

      cud be caused by kidney problem also

      or maybe you have a cavity and caries in your teeth = causing bad breath

      this is the list of the causes of halitosis :

      Extensive dental decay
      Periodontal (gum) disease
      Oral infections or abscesses
      Oral cancers
      Xerostomia (dry mouth condition). Many medications can contribute to a condition of xerostomia.
      Oral conditions resulting from post-nasal drips or discharges
      Allergy conditions
      A proliferation of specific types of gram (-) anaerobic bacteria.

      Sinus infections & abnormal sinus anatomies, post nasal drainage (drips)
      Tonsilar infections or tonsiloliths
      Lung diseases
      Kidney diseases
      Liver diseases
      Blood disorders
      Diabetes
      Gallbladder dysfunction
      Menstruation
      Carcinomas
      Certain foods

      for the treatment you could go to the nearest dentist or medical doctor and they will give you prescription..

      good luck ^_^

  22. QUESTION:
    How can you tell if your thyroid.....?
    isn't working properly what are the signs and symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.
      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.
      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      These are POSSIBLES for HypOthyroidism.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  23. QUESTION:
    Bad Breath / Haliotosis ..post nasal drip? acid reflux? I have tried everything. Diagnose me!?
    I have had this problem for as long as i have remembered. It has nothing to do with personal hygene. No matter how clean i make my mouth my mouth can become bitter/salty and smell musty or worse. I have tried hydrogen peroxide mixed with water, listerine, drinking lots of water, nasal spray, mouth probiotics(breezecare). Surprisingly what works best is drinking alcohol.. I NEVER have bad breath after a night of drinking! Chewing gum also helps quite a bit.. The mint helps a bit but i feel like the main reason gum helps is the saliva and consequent swallowing preventing bad bacteria settling on tongue.

    Often when i get bad breath i my tongue feels furry and i feel a bit congested inside. I think the problem may either be post nasal drip related or to do with acid reflux.. However as nasal spray hasnt worked for me im not so sure.. Im about to try zantac to see if its acid reflux related..
    My daily routine is the following.. floss teeth, brush teeth, rinse with HP, then with probiotic
    Oh ... i forgot to meantion.. i also scrape my tongue and brush it!
    Is this how you reply to a question? Anyway, i would doubt it is a rotten tooth. My dentist said my teeth are well looked after.. And i have had this problem for ever. The smell seems to be only on my tongue.
    ulcer? Dont mean to be defensive but please explain what makes u think it may be a ulcer(medically)..

    Also almost forgot to meantion. Reducing my intake of dairy does seem to help a bit but is not a complete solution :(

    I think the way to realising what it might be is considering why drinking alcohol(mainly beer) is prevent it... im not sure if its the beer bacteria or the alcohol itself that helps though!
    Thanks heather. a lot of good advice there! I drank a chocolate milk the other day and it did make me feel quite gluggy and coincidentally tongue odour was harder to control.. I really like cheese in my salad sandwhiches though!? Can i at least have that? I cant say the zantac has made any definitive changes.. Once again after a night of alcohol(thursday night) yesterday my breath was controllable.(not perfect like usual though which is probably due to to the milk!)

    I am now 90% sure its post nasal drip related.. Ill get some benadryl and tell you the results after a few days use. I would get a nasal spray too but my nose is clear atm.. its beyond that towards the throat i feel congested.
    Quick question.. what is the best alternative to benadryl that does not have sedative effects? I read benadryls wikipedia article and was a bit alarmed by the fact it will make me tired! Anything that works as well but without bad effects?

    • ANSWER:
      If this is not a dental problem then it’s possible that it could be digestive related.

      The bitter salty taste you mentioned is associated with dry mouth which is usually caused by medications. Have you looked into what types of medications you take daily?

      The musty odor is usually noticed when a crown is leaking or has decay under it. Do you have any crowns and have you mentioned this to your dentist?

      Also, chewing gum will help to increase the salivary glands productions, thus washing the mouth more frequently eliminating the bad taste. It does help decrease the symptoms of dry mouth.

      Post nasal drip can also be a cause of this taste and odor; do you take medications for this? Some of the medications are dehydrating causing dry mouth.

      Acid reflux is another known cause of bad breath and odor.

      From what you have described you could have several problems that may or may not be associated or the actual cause of this problem. I would suggest you look at what medications you are taking, even over the counter. Eliminate any that aren't absolutely necessary. Get the acid reflux under control with Zantac, Propose or Tums. Avoid dehydrating drinks, colas, teas and drink lots of water for a few days. The nasal congestion may need to be treated with a decongestant such as Benadryl rather than a nasal spray. Although taking Benadryl may contribute to dry mouth. The furry feeling on your tongue is how bacteria feel when predominantly on the surface of the teeth or tongue. Try brushing your teeth more often, making sure to be thorough and brush the tongue, roof of your mouth and cheek tissue.

      You may have to go through a process by elimination to determine what the cause is and how to treat it. I don't think drinking beer will be a solution for the problem though.

      Also, you may need to eliminate your dairy intake, rather than reduce it. If you saw results with a reduced intake then its possible that the problem could be digestive related. There are many people who have bad breath due to digestive disorders, discuss this with your dentist or doctor. They will be able to give you more advice with a thorough examination. Good luck.

      Additional information: I would have to say Benadryl or one of the store brand names of it will work the best at drying the sinuses and upper respiratory. You may want to look at the different ones, some claim not to cause the drowsiness, although to be an effective decongestant, they must have the active ingredient that’s main side effect is known to be drowsiness. Some times the effects or results well out weight the affects of the medications. When you try it for the first time, make a point of being at home so you can sleep if necessary, or you may want to try it at night time so the side effects will have worn off by morning and it may leave you with the desired results.

      Actually when you drink alcohol, you are causing the same effect; a similar dehydration takes place in the body resulting from the alcohol consumption. So you are correct with the assumption that a night of drinking makes the bad breath, not quite as bad. Although I don't think daily drinking would be a good solution to this problem.

      The Zantac should decrease any heart burn or acid reflux but won’t show any positive signs of being effective other than the relief from those.

      My thoughts are that you may have a combination of problems that are related to the bad breath; possibly upper respiratory congestion or ear, nose and throat conditions and a digestive disorder. It wouldn’t be prudent of me to suggest treating this entirely with over the counter medications, but you may be able to do a process by elimination and pin point more closely what triggers or stimulates this condition so that you may discuss this more in depth and intelligently with your family physician aiding him in a correct diagnosis and treatment.

      So, I would suggest this, stop all dairy products temporarily, take the smallest dose of Benadryl, preferably at bed time, drink plenty of fluids, mainly water or juices, continue Zantac on a daily basis and see what results you may have. Monitor this for several days keeping a written record of your symptoms and any changes noticed on a daily basis. Then if you have good results with this after four or five days, slowly introduce a dairy product back into your diet, keeping a record of what and how much you had along with any ill effects from this. If the problem arises again, then discontinue the dairy completely and if not, slowly add a few more dairy products into your diet. If the symptoms have improved by then with taking the Benadryl and eating dairy, you may want to discontinue Zantac for a few days, to see if it is truly needed, but continue with keeping a record of medications and all dairy foods or any trigger foods. If symptoms heart burn or acid reflux returns, resume taking the Zantac again. Then if the symptoms have improved, you will want to slowly discontinue taking the Benadryl, let’s say take it every other day for a few days and then discontinue it completely, and see if the bad breath or other symptoms return. My assumption would be that the discontinuation of the Benadryl will cause the symptoms to return since I feel this is an ENT condition and possible digestive disorder.

      I feel medication should only be taken if truly needed; it’s better to take none rather than taking unnecessary medication that may mask symptoms caused by another condition that should be addressed. Keeping a record of what medications you are taking and foods you are eating will help you and your doctor in diagnosing this condition.

      I hope this will offer you some assistance or as a guide to go by to help you to determine what is causing and what will relieve this condition. Let me know what results you gain from this or if I can be of any further assistance.

  24. QUESTION:
    Treatment for Post nasal drip?
    does it have to be treated or will it just go away? What are the symptoms of a post nasal drip?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms

      Swallowing constantly
      Spitting (mucus) constantly
      Tickling in the throat
      Constant clearing of throat
      Mucus feeling in the back of the throat
      Difficulty in breathing
      Congestion in the nasal and sinus passages
      Chronic sore throat
      Crystals found in the tonsils that are generally yellow or white (commonly called tonsil stones, or tonsilloliths)
      Bad breath
      Coughing
      Feeling nauseated due to accumulation of mucus in stomach
      Vomiting due to excessive mucus in stomach
      Cobblestone appearance of the oropharyngeal mucus

      Treatment

      Treatment may include antibiotics, nasal irrigation, or minor surgery.

      Other treatments, for the allergy aspect of the disorder, include the usage of antihistamines and/or decongestants to treat the most common effects. Steroids may also be prescribed for short-term usage, as extended use may cause harmful side effects.

  25. QUESTION:
    this one spot under my tonsil near my ear is killing me!?
    this spot has been hurting a little now its worse to where its hurting in my ear and when i swallow things the food feels like its cutting it. what is this?

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds as if you have tonsil stone or tonsiliths which are caused when food particles lodges in the creases in your tonsils. Trapping of food, bacteria, dead cell, mucous from post nasal dripping can result in calcification/hardening of these ingredients to create tonsil stones. The stones can cause pain especially referred ear pain, sore throat, bad breath, difficulty swallowing and tonsil inflammation.

      You can see them as whitish or yellowish lumps on your tonsils.

      http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/tonsil-stones-tonsilloliths-treatment-and-prevention
      http://www.drgreene.com/21_568.html

      Although some people use picks or cotton swabs to remove them, gargling with salt water or salt & baking soda may help. You could also try gargling with vinegar because it is an antibacterial. Warm water mix will feel better than cold and help the baking soda to dissolve. Another mouthwash people use for its antibacterial properties is Corsodyl.

      You can have them surgically removed. One treatment is lasering to kind of smooth out the area. The other surgical procedure is to have your tonsils removed. When the tonsillectomy is performed, the tissue folds causing the the entrapment are also removed and....should be about 99.9% relieved of having them again. Just remember that the tonsils do have a function in your body besides causing you the misery of tonsilloliths

      I am including a link about eliminating them yourself using AktivOxigen tablets, nasal sinus drops and sometimes using an Oxygenating Spray. You also want to do periodic tongue scraping as it is the interaction of the VSCs (volital sulfur compounds) produced by the anaerobic bacteria on you tongue which cause halitosis.

      http://www.tonsilstones.net/tonsil-stones-overview-and-a1.html
      You can see a picture of something similar to your own mouth and read lots more at Wikipedia:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonsillolith

      I have read that avoiding dairy foods might reduce or eliminate the calcification. I also found a Health Board discussion board with questions and practical advice:
      http://abchomeopathy.com/forum2.php/50088/
      http://www.healthboards.com/boards/archive/index.php/t-380186.html

      There is no question that the pain you are suffering can be too much to endure at times so it is time to do something about it - the choice of what you do is yours.

  26. QUESTION:
    Could this cause a serious condition??
    I have excessive post nasal drip. Not only does it cause discoloration in my mouth, it also can sometimes cause bad breath which I never had before and now I think the escessive mucous is harming my stomach. I always have an upset stomach, and continuously go to the bathroom but my stool seems much softer than it used to be for about 2 months now. My doctor told me it was sinueses and gave me a medicine but ever since that was when my stools changed and never went back to normal since. The condition still persists also..can this cause my stomach pain and should I keep seeing the doctor???

    • ANSWER:
      Does your doctor know all of you what mentioned here, or did you just tell him about the sinus problem? Not sure if I would keep seeing that particular doctor, but you should see one. From what you say, you might want to consider consulting a Gastroenterologist

      Gastroenterologist: A physician who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, including the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, and biliary system.
      .

  27. QUESTION:
    Bad Breath & Halitosis Cures?
    Bad Breath & Post Nasal Drip-What’s the Connection?

    Tagged:Bad, Breath, badbreath, cure, bad, breath, cause, bad, breath, cures, bad, breath, causesBad Breath & Post Nasal Drip-What’s the Connection?
    Both cause Dry Mouth. Dry Mouth is Stress turned inwards.
    In one moment a high stress load can result in years of Bad Breath (Halitosis)
    It even feeds on itself.
    Do you know the most common treatment people who know they have Bad Breath use?
    They hold their breath!
    And holding your breath is very effective.
    Unless the elevator you’re in has more than 8 floors. That’s about the 30 second mark when you have to take another breath, at which point all others in the elevator will get off at the next floor quick, even if that floor is the seventh circle of hell.
    During all this your Bad Breath bacteria loves it, as they can’t stand Oxygen or water and love Stress.
    The next most common treatment people use is to either keep as far away as possible to the person your talking too, 20 yards should do it, or using the phone is perfect even if the person you’re talking with is in the next office.
    It seems now the very best treatment is stay at home hopefully on your own and have everything you need delivered to you preferably through a small opening in the wall.
    This leads to depression which your doctor will quickly prescribe anti depressants and the bacteria in your mouth throat and sinus start congratulating each other knowing that those pills will keep your mouth dry and guarantee there existence.
    Bacteria like fire make an excellent servant but a terrible master.
    As you see bacteria, like all life will endure any insult suffer any humiliation just for the hope, the possibility of a moment’s additional existence.
    Yet engaging the right advice to the letter will put the cycle back to where it started with mind and body in healthy sync.
    Oraltech Research Laboratories, written technical extract. C Copyright 2010-2020
    Full article available at oraltech.com.au

    • ANSWER:
      wtf...

  28. QUESTION:
    Do I have Post Nasal Drip?
    I don't know whether I have Post Nasal Drip or not, i just constantly have to clear my throat but i dont have a cough or anything. And it's worse in the morning and i just have this clear mucus running down the back of my throat thats hard to get down! I was also wondering if this was the cause of my bad breath, cause i have had blood tests but they came back negative, and i saw my dentist and everything was fine in my mouth aparently. I've had bad breath for over a year now and have been trying to find a cure and i just wondered if it was the Post Nasal Drip, and if it was what medication would be best to get Over the counter?

    Thank you :-) xx

    • ANSWER:
      It defintely sounds like Post Nasal Drip to me.

      "Treatment for postnasal drip depends on the cause of the problem. Bacterial infections are treated with antibiotics. However, green or yellow mucus is not necessarily proof of a bacterial infection. Colds can also turn the mucus these colors and they are caused by viruses, which don't respond to antibiotics.

      Antihistamines and decongestants can help with postnasal drip caused by sinusitis and viral infections. They can also be effective, along with steroid medications or nasal sprays, for postnasal drip caused by allergies. The older, over-the-counter antihistamines (Benadryl, Chlor-Trimetron) might not be the best choices for postnasal drip, because when they dry out mucus, they can actually thicken it. The newer generation of antihistamines (Clarinex, Allegra, Xyzal) may be better options, and are less likely to cause drowsiness. It's a good idea to check with your doctor before treating your postnasal drip, because all of these medications can have side effects, which range from dizziness to dry mouth."

      "Another treatment option for postnasal drip is to thin your mucus. Mucus can have different consistencies. Thick mucus is stickier and more likely to cause you discomfort. Keeping the mucus thin helps prevent blockages in the ears and sinuses, which can lead to infections. A simple remedy to thin mucus is to drink more water.

      Other methods you can try include:

      Take a mucus-thinning medication such as guaifenesin (Mucinex)
      Use saline nasal sprays or nasal irrigation (such as a neti pot) to flush excess mucus, bacteria, allergens, and other irritating substances out of the sinuses
      Turn on a vaporizer or humidifier to increase the moisture in the air

      Try propping up your pillows at night so that the mucus doesn't run down the back of your throat. If you have allergies, ways to reduce your triggers include:

      Cover your mattresses and pillowcases with dust-proof covers
      Wash all sheets, pillowcases, and mattress covers often in hot water
      Use special HEPA air filters in your home
      Dust and vacuum regularly

      Call your doctor if the nasal drainage is foul smelling, you have a fever, you're wheezing, or your symptoms last for 10 days or more, because you might have a bacterial infection. Let your doctor know right away if you notice blood in your postnasal drip. If medication isn't helping your postnasal drip, you might need to see an otolaryngologist for evaluation, which can include a CT scan, X-rays, or other tests."

      http://www.webmd.com/allergies/postnasal-drip

      Hope this helps:)

  29. QUESTION:
    What does bumps on the back of tongue mean ?
    at the back where it starts down throat by tonsils

    • ANSWER:
      Some people notice that they have small white hard lumps in the back of the throat in the tonsil region. The lumps range in size from quite tiny to pea size and they tend to remain lodged in the tonsillar area for some time, until they eventually become dislodged. They are often associated with a bad smell coming from the tonsil area, and may create the physical sensation of having something lodged in the back of the throat.

      Tonsiloliths are accumulations of dead skin cells and other cellular and noncellular debris that wash down the back of the throat from the sinuses and nasal cavities. People who suffer from post nasal drip often have tonsiloliths because they have a regular flow of mucus and sinus drainage past the tonsils. The little stones occur in the tonsillar crypts because this is one place where material can become lodged. Because they contain abundant protein, they provide a fertile place for bacteria to flourish, particularly the anaerobic bacteria that live on the back of the tongue and in other airless places in the mouth. The growth and metabolism of these bacteria produce bad breath from tonsils - halitosis.

      Tonsiloliths, sometimes also referred to as tonsil stones, can be very difficult to get rid of. Though the individual stones eventually become dislodged and get swallowed, more will soon begin to form. Individuals who have had their tonsils removed usually do not suffer from tonsiloliths, but tonsillectomy is not a recommended treatment for the problem: remedies are best directed at the bad breath from tonsils as this is the most troublesome symptom.

  30. QUESTION:
    Have I got post nasal drip?
    I have a problem where every morning I have watery mucus at the back of my tounge, which leads to VERY bad breath. I can rid my tounge every morning of the mucus by using an Ora-Brush tool, but I would like to know where this mucus comes from, is it a 'post nasal drip'? If so/not how can I treat it (ie stop the mucus dripping onto my tounge in the first place)? Thanks!

    PS the mucus only forms on my tounge overnight, not during the day

    • ANSWER:
      UndeadInfection,
      Causes of postnasal drip include allergies, the common cold, and the flu. It also sometimes accompanies other respiratory bacterial or viral infections or can be brought on by simple irritation, such as eating very spicy foods. Certain medications can cause postnasal drip, such as drugs containing oestrogen. Postnasal drip develops when too much mucus collects at the back of the nose or in the throat. Postnasal drip is not life threatening and usually resolves on its own. However, if the symptom lasts more than a few weeks, and if it is accompanied by foul-smelling discharge, which might transfer to the breath, you should contact a doctor to identify the cause. Especially if you have facial lumps or a non-healing sore in your nose, loose or painful upper teeth, a persistent or mucus-producing cough with sore throat, white patches and redness on your tongue or in your mouth, a persistent fever, or a feeling of something stuck in your throat that will not go away.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  31. QUESTION:
    I have Acid reflux...i think. HELP!?
    I get really bad breath and its to to what i think is acid reflux. I feel a flem sitting in the back of my throat. Is this a post nasal drip or acid? How do i get rid of it a long with the bad breath?

    • ANSWER:
      acid reflux refers to gastroesophageal reflux disease commonly due to transient or permanent changes in the barrier between the esophagus and the stomach.

      bad breath can be one symptom of it. and you need to cure this disease to get rid of bad breath. added to that, you must see to it that you give full attention to proper oral hygiene. seek the help of your physician and dental hygienist.

      natural oral rinses are also great in reducing bacteria-causing bad breath and keeps mouth clean and healthy by hydrating it.

      visit http://www.oramd.co.uk about natural treatments for bad breath

  32. QUESTION:
    Why does most people breathe stink?
    And, expecially, why such a disgusting unbearable occurrence is currently undervalued and doctors aren't mainly engaged agaist it...why is it easily born, or, better why are such people borne??

    • ANSWER:
      Halitosis (bad breath) is, mainly , caused by sulphur-producing bacteria that normally live within the surface of the tongue and in the throat. Sometimes, these bacteria start to break down proteins at a very high rate and odorous volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) are released from the back of the tongue and throat. Halitosis is not infectious.

      Causes of halitosis

      The major causes of halitosis are:
      Xerostomia or Dry mouth - caused by medicines, alcohol, stress or a medical condition.
      Foods high in protein, sugar or acid.
      Smoking - which starves the mouth of oxyggen.

      Dental factors - such as periodontitis (infection around the teeth) oral infections or abscesses;allergy conditions; or poor oral hygiene.
      Nasal and sinus infections; postnasal drips
      Tonsillar infections or tonsiloliths
      .
      Less common causes
      Less common causes of halitosis include:
      Acid and bile reflux from the stomach.
      Post nasal discharge - for example, due to chronic sinusitis.
      Hormonal factors - such as menstrual cycle or pregnancy.
      Certain Foods - such as onions, garlic or cauliflower, which induce certain odours. However, these effects are only transitory or short lived.

      Symptoms
      The features of halitosis can include:
      A white coating on the tongue
      Dry mouth and teeth
      Post nasal drip, or mucous
      Morning bad breath and a burning tongue
      Thick saliva and a constant need to clear your throat
      Constant sour, bitter metallic taste.
      Having halitosis can have a major impact on a person. Because of bad breath, other people may back away or turn their heads. This can cause a loss of confidence and self-esteem.

      Treating halitosis
      There is no one treatment for halitosis. The treatment will depend on what is causing the problem. Good oral hygiene, including thorough brushing and flossing to remove any food debris lodge betwenn the crevices of the teeth.- is important. Some mouthwashes esp bacteria- killing like Redx or Periodex and toothpastes are effective in fighting halitosis. Personal hygiene includes brushing the tonque in an outward motion.
      Alcohol based mouthwashes in fact will worsen the problem because they dry out the mouth thus increasing the volatilization of breath odors.

      People with chronic sinusitis may find the regular use of a saline nasal spray helpful. A course of an antibiotic, effective against anaerobic bacteria (such as metronidazole, to reduce the overgrowth of sulphur-producing bacteria), may also help. Speak to your dentist, doctor or chemist to identify the cause of your halitosis and to find the most effective treatment for you.

      Halitosis is caused by sulphur-producing anaerobic bacteria ( they thrive in oxygen deprived environment) within the tongue and throat. That's why the use of hydrogen peroxide is good as it has oxygen.

      The major causes include a dry mouth caused by certain foods, smoking, poor oral hygiene and hormonal factors. Drinking a lot of water will help with the dry mucosa of the mouth.
      The treatment of halitosis will depend on the underlying cause.

      Halitosis doesn't come from the stomach or the lungs.

      Halitosis is not hereditary. Certain conditions that can contribute to a bad breath condition can be hereditary, but there is no halitosis gene that can be passed on to an offspring.

  33. QUESTION:
    how to cure bad breath or bad smell from mouth?

    • ANSWER:
      First you have to determine the cause of the bad breath.

      Bad breath (halitosis) can be caused by a variety of things including diet, medication, poor oral hygiene, and diseases or conditions such as diabetes, GERD, lactose intolerance, gum disease, and more. Treatment for bad breath depends on the cause.

      There are many things that can cause bad breath, including the following:

      Diet

      When a person does not brush or floss their teeth thoroughly, food particles may remain in the mouth. These particles may rot and cause foul odors. In addition, food particles over time can promote the growth of bacteria, which can also cause foul odors. The bacteria can also lead to tooth decay and gum disease.

      Foods with strong odors also affect the air a person exhales. Foods commonly known to contribute to bad breath include onions and garlic, exotic spices (such as curry), some cheeses, fish, and acidic beverages such as coffee. Foods are absorbed into the bloodstream and then transferred to the lungs, causing noticeable odors when exhaled. These foods may also cause gastrointestinal upset and belching, which can contribute to bad breath. In addition, certain supplements such as fish oil capsules can contribute to bad breath.

      Low carbohydrate diets may also cause what is known as 'ketone breath.' So-called 'low carb' diets cause the body to burn fat as its energy source. The end-product of making this energy are ketones, which cause a fruity acetone-like odor on the breath when exhaled.
      Dry Mouth

      Bad breath can also be caused by decreased flow of saliva, which is a vital part of the digestive process and removes odor-causing particles in the mouth. Also called xerostomia, dry mouth may be caused by medications, breathing through the mouth, or salivary gland problems.
      Tobacco Products

      In addition to causing bad breath, smoking or chewing tobacco-based products can stain teeth, irritate gum tissue, and exacerbate tooth decay.
      Medical Disorders

      Certain medical disorders may cause bad breath, for example:

      gum or periodontal infection,

      throat infection (pharyngitis or tonsillitis),

      local infection in the respiratory tract,

      chronic sinusitis and/or post-nasal drip,

      chronic bronchitis,

      diabetes,

      gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD),

      liver or kidney disease,

      Sjogren's syndrome (causes xerostomia), and

      lactose intolerance.
      Dentures or Dental Appliances

      Dentures or dental appliances, such as braces, can contribute to bad breath. Most often it is due to food particles that are not properly cleansed from the appliances. Loose-fitting dentures can contribute to sores and localized infections in the mouth, which can cause bad breath.
      Morning Breath

      Overnight, bacteria accumulate in the mouth, causing bad breath that is commonly referred to as 'morning breath.' Some people breathe through their mouth at night, which can cause dry mouth and worsen morning breath.

      You could brush and floss your teeth 5 times a day but it won't cure the problem if the cause of the bad breath is your stomach (GERD etc) You might see a dentist or a dr about it. They can help you determine the cause and then figure out how to treat it.

  34. QUESTION:
    Is this really asthma?
    I'll start by saying i'm 25 and i've never in my life had asthma before.
    A brief backstory: I worked in a factory for about a year and a half. The factory was dusty, dirty, chemicals all over the place, but I went in day after day. One day, I had a sudden attack on my breathing while at work. Doctor told me it was a panic attack so I didn't think much of it. I took a day off work thinking I just needed a rest but I went back in the next day and it got worse. So eventually my job fired me which I was very mad about at the time but considered that they had done me a favor.

    I went to see a psychotherapist for about 5 months and she was actually helping a great deal. At least whatever mental aspects of the problem were there, seemed to be slowly but surely dissipating. But the breathing problem was still there, albeit feeling lesser than before. But yet still there months after quiting the job.

    I had given up drinking for awhile because that seemed to worsen the problems, but my therapist told me that hey, now that you're doing better I don't think drinking should do you any harm if done in moderation. So one night I went out with friends, and had a few drinks. It wasn't even an amount that was enough to make me drunk. Immediately my chest seized up, my neck tightened and i started to hyperventilate. I brushed it off to a panic attack and just went home and went to sleep. I woke up with a burning throat, chest, tongue, rapid heart beat. I rushed to the ER, they did an EKG, blood work up, bunch of tests, all came out normal. They told me it's probably acid reflux and gave me prevacid and told me go see a gastroenterologist.

    I went to see a gastroenterologist he did an upper endoscopy and a colonoscopy on me. Issues found were minor. Patulous esophagus, mild gastritis (which apparently lots of people have), irritable bowel syndrome. No answers to my breathing issue.

    So I took an asthma test eventually as the symptoms worsened. Inability to take a full breath or yawn, numb tingling feelin gin my tongue, throat, mouth, very tight neck, dizzy feeling whenever I get up, and i'm pretty much house bound. To even be able to leave the house I have to take a Xanax and even that only helps a little. And before you say it, I have definitely not ruled out anxiety as a possibility.

    Anyways did the asthma test where you breathe in whatever meds it is to test it out. The doc told me I have severe asthma because there was a big difference when i breathed in that stuff and when I took the treatment and my original measurement.

    So doc said it's definitely not anxiety. I legitimately have breathing troubles and that those are what are causing me anxiety. And then a ENT also saw that I have post nasal drip and swelling in my nose.

    So he prescribed (for anyone who knows this stuff)
    Prednisone 14 day course
    Montelukast 1/day
    Asmanex Twsithaler 2 puffs in the morning 2 at night
    Foradil Aerolizer 1 puff in the morning 1 at night
    Zyrtec once a day
    And an emergeny inhaler I forget what it's called but only to be taken as needed.

    So i'm basically taking 5 medicines a day and they haven't been helping.

    I still feel:
    Chest hurting, constantly
    Back pain (unsure if related)
    Major neck tension that never goes away
    A consistent feeling of tight chest/not getting enough air 24/7
    Constant runny nose and sneezing with no cold or flu symptoms
    Numb tongue, mouth, throat
    Persistent hyperventilation lasting beginning of the day to the end of the day,
    Xanax helping minimally but not enough to help me enjoy my life again
    Feeling like throat closing up on me
    The only diagnosis i've gotten is (anxiety, go home and relax (ER)) and (Asthma and allergies, take asthma and allergy meds (Pulmonologist)

    Could it be that? Could it be nothing? Could I be going crazy? Please someone I need help.
    See i'm not really sure, the doc told me there's something called reflux induced asthma, which he said is different from typical asthma. So he told me I have a combination of things, acid reflux (which the ENT determined) allergies (which ENT also determined and I have to take some blood tests to figure out what exactly those allergies are), post nasal drip, acid reflux (determined by gastro doc) and asthma (determined by pulmonologist. I gave him all the info from the other doctors and that's what he concluded. It seemed to make sense at least when he said it. I've been taking the meds he perscribed me for a week, but he told me to give it more time, at least 3 weeks to a month. i'm just having a hard time doing that.
    Purple heart, thanks for your medical opinion/knowledge. I've read a lot about asthma too since the time he told me I got it, and what i'm wondering is about the connection between Asthma and Reflux because a lot of people say there is one. Now, I definitely wouldn't say I have typical signs of asthma in the sense that I have a harder time with exhaling than inhaling. Inhaling is the bigger problem. At the same time I've had regular situational panic attacks and they don't feel like this.

    The biggest thing with this is that my nose is always running, i'm sneezing quite a lot, big build up of mucus in my throat and mouth. And it actually is painful when I breathe in and out. Interested to know your further ideas or anyone else?

    • ANSWER:
      Excellent details. Thank you.

      Before any psychology disorder can and may be diagnosed, any abnormality of the anatomy and physiology related should have been ruled out.

      ENT vs Pulmonologist.
      In cases like this. when the breathing problem occur, try to breathe from nose and mouth. If breathing from mouth improves, then the problem may be in the ENT. But if no differences, then you should visit a pulmonologist.

      In asthma, exhale will be harder than inhale. So the remaining air is trapped inside and giving the sensation of chest tightness. While in panic attack/hyperventilation you tend to inhale and exhale rapidly, uncontrollable.

      In Asthma, it tends to be related with your environment. Whether the weather (cold), morning, dusty, pollens, etc. While in panic attack, usually there is something trigger your psychological problem (I don't know what in this case, it may be crowded place, scared of something, anxiety when thinking of something, etc.

      Asthma usually has the distinctive wheezing breath sound. And through the mechanism of asthma, asthma medication dilates back your airway, decreasing the spasm. And chances are, it is asthma if your breathing improves alot by that asthma medication.

      Note:
      In most cases. Alcoholic drinks do more harm than good.

  35. QUESTION:
    Sleep Apnea, could it be?
    Hello everyone, went to the doctor today regarding my sleep issues. A few years ago I would have episodes of waking out of a dead sleep choking and gasping for air. I always thought it was due to my severe acid reflux ( I was very overweight, 220lbs, only 5'3" female). I have since lost almost 90 lbs, i am now at a normal healthy weight.

    Recently in the last couple of months the waking up and choking has started again. The other day, I actually had to get out of bed and stand up and just could not catch my breath, I was choking so bad. It feels like I am choking on my saliva. I do have allergies and post nasal drip really bad, I read online that the fluid in the throat can cause these symptons.

    My doctor wants me to get a sleep study....what does everyone think.

    • ANSWER:
      I've had terrible experiences with sleep centers, sleep studies, and Sleep Doctors. My advice, unless you are seriously suffering, avoid sleep studies.

      If you think it could be reflux, allergies and Post Nasal Drip, by all means see if you can treat those conditions first. (Unless the doctor has already ruled that out.)

      Sleep Studies are expensive, the treatments they recommend are expensive, and in some cases they can affect your job and your ability to get health insurance in the future.

      After all that trouble, you still might not get relief. A sleep study is no guarantee that you will eventually sleep better.

  36. QUESTION:
    Do i have a thyroid problem?
    I have been doing nothing different to my hair, and for the last 5-6 my hair has been falling out like crazy? Like handfuls of hair in the shower, and when i brush it. I never use to lose this much hair not even when i use to dye it all the time. I also am always very sleepy! Are these the correct symptoms of a thyroid problem? what are some other symptoms, please help! (p.s im only 17)

    • ANSWER:
      Nowadays more your age & younger are finding they have this :(

      These are POSSIBLES ... probably nobody has all (tho I came close:):
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.
      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.
      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.
      Some of the symptoms can be opposite according to whether hypo or hyper.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless you

  37. QUESTION:
    why do i have poop breath?
    I have tried everything..my husband says it's better and not happening as often but i think he's just trying to make me feel better. i go to the dentist twice a year,no problems there.. i take digestive enzymes,probiotics,grape seed extract,chew gum with zylitol.i take a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar before i eat to aid in digestion.i have between one and three bowel movements a day. i've tried thera breath, rinsing with diluted hydrogen peroxide. baking soda..basically everything under the sun.i use nasal irrigation when i have post nasal drip..i feel like i'm covering all of my bases for what could be causing the problem but nothing seems to work..also,when i swallow my ears make a popping sound..not sure if it is connected. my acupuncturist said the breath is related to digestion and started me on treatment (only had two) but i can no longer afford to go..i am so frustrated and at a loss. i can't afford to see an ent which i know is what people will say to do but if it is related to nasal drip i would think the nasal irrigation would have helped. anyone possibly have any ideas that i haven't tried already?

    • ANSWER:
      I would talk to you doctor about it because there are actually diseases that can cause bad breath like Halitosis.

      Wiki has a good, informational article about it:

      (Hope this helps!)

  38. QUESTION:
    What can this be!!!??
    Can Post-Nasal Drip cause minor chest discomfort and breathing difficulty..I know that mucus can sometimes get into your air passages...The mucus is clear and I don't have a fever, but I do feel mucus down my throat that gets worse at night.

    • ANSWER:
      Definitely, I am at the doctor on a regular basis because of this. All the mucous goes down throat, especially while laying down, then I cough, then I have bouts of not being able to catch enough breath. She has given me inhalers, and sometimes I've even needed nebulizer treatment while there. I never have a fever either. I find if I take a combo decongestant and antihistamine, I don't cough nearly as much, and it helps dry up the mucous.

  39. QUESTION:
    problems with bad breath?
    My 4 yr old seems to have bad breath. i was using milk teeth 4-6 yrs on him but changed to the colgate kids one cos it was more minty hoping that would help. It's better but he's still got bad breath.Seems alot worse at the mo cos i'm pregnant and feel constantly sick. Anyone got any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Heya,
      First of all congratulations on becoming pregnant i wish you all the luck.
      This is common bad breath can be caused by alot of things so before this is removed completely from him you have got to see what may be causing it, so theres :
      (1)-Postnasal Drip - This is most common cause of bad breath in children, and may be caused by allergies, recurrent colds or chronic sinus infection. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-nasal_drip
      (2)-Poor Dentition- is usually suspected when children have bad breath. It may be from cavities, inflammed gums (gingivitis) or trapped food particles, which can also become trapped in the crypts of the tonsils, leading to tonsilloliths.
      (3)-Mouth Breathing,- whether because of allergies or enlarged adenoids, can also lead to bad breath, usually because the mouth becomes dry and saliva can not perform its role of washing away bacteria in the mouth. Other conditions that lead to a dry mouth, such as taking certain medications, can also lead to bad breath. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouth_breathing
      (4)-Nasal Foreign Body - a small item placed and stuck in a child's nose can often get infected and lead to an odor. A clue for this problem is that they will often just have a green discharge from one nostril, whereas most infections would cause drainage from both sides of their nose -http://www.ncemi.org/cse/cse0309.htm
      Bad Breath can also be assosciated with eating certain foods.
      Bad breath can often be treated or prevented through good oral hygeine, including brushing and flossing, cleaning the back of the tongue, keeping the mouth moist, rinsing the mouth, and treatment of any underlying allergies, sinus infections or other medical conditions that may be contributing to the bad breath. So it would be a good idea to talk to your doctor about this and get this sorted either way for you no problem.
      Hope i helped and good luck with your pregnancy
      x

  40. QUESTION:
    boyfriend with bad breath!!! help please?
    my boyfriend has really bad breath. i love him alot and i don't want to embarrass him about it but sometimes it just smells reaaaally bad.. i just don't understand how he cannot smell it himself. at first i thought he had a problem with smelling but i found out that's not the case. i brush my teeth several times a day to make sure mine doesn't smell. how should i tell him without it being really awkward??

    • ANSWER:
      Be honest with him and tell him.

      The main reasons for bad breath is bacteria in the mouth. If he doesn't get his teeth cleaned every 6 months, he could just need a good cleaning. Another huge thing is having him brush his tongue. Bacteria and plaque get stuck between your taste buds on your tongue (your tongue can look like it has a white coating on it). Request him trying to brush his tongue daily or use a tongue scraper that you can get at any store. He has to get as far back as he can.

      Another reason for bad breath is post-nasal drip. If he has sinus problems or is sick with a cold, the mucous from your nose runs down the back of your throat and causes bad breath. Some people have chronic post-nasal drip, and there's not much you can do about that. But if he's sick, and that is the cause, the bad breath should be temporary.

      Mints, gums, mouth rinses will just cover up the odor temporarily. It's best to get to the root of the problem and resolve it that way.

      If he is in need of a lot of dental treatment like fillings, etc., it could be odor of the bacteria in the decayed areas on his teeth. Or if he has periodontal disease (any type of bone loss/gum disease), that has a certain odor as well.

  41. QUESTION:
    thick vomit with a cough...?
    My 4 year old daughter coughs a lot at night because of seasonal allergies (post nasal drip). Every so often she throws up from coughing. Tonight she did, and it was so thick she choked on it. It's happened before, but this time was the worst. It was like, really abnormally thick. After she gets done with a bit she gasps for breath.....
    Is it because she's swallowing so much mucus, or could something else going on? I hate calling her doctor for minor things like this. I feel like they'll think I'm a luney-bin who is making stuff up...

    • ANSWER:
      My son used to do this. They diagnosed him with asthma. I found out later he was allergic to red dye. Every time he would drink something with red in it, he would seem as if he was extremely congested and then vomit pure mucus. Thick and nasty. She is probably just gasping for breath because you cant breathe when you are vomiting! I would call the doctor and have her checked and maybe they can give you a nebulizer with albuterol treatments. They did my son, although once I cut red out we no longer had the problem Good Luck, they wont think you are looney, just concerned. Believe me, they have parents that call 20 times a day on a daily basis.

  42. QUESTION:
    My Chest hurts when i cough? Really need answers!?
    We thought i had PND (Post nasal drip) because i had ALL of the symptoms, but now, my chest hurts on the right side when i cough. right around my um. you know... area. LOL. and my upper back hurts too. same side. i still feel that oozing down the back of my throat and still have all the symptoms of PND, but now my chest and upper back are hurting, which arent symptoms. i have mild fevers some of the time, shortness of breath (occasionally), of course chest pains, and im SUPER tired. so, what is it?

    Oh and BTW: i have a very bad producing cough. my grandma said it sounds like its coming from my chest... every time i cough, like i cough up a TON of mucus. and my throat hurts too.
    do i HAVE to go to the doctor? cuz like, i really hate the doctor... its not bad pain. and its not every time. i hate the doctor. so...
    Can you like tell me if i have bronchitis, because my grandma suggested it.
    we've decided i have acute bronchitis. kbai.

    • ANSWER:
      I am a Resp Care Practioner and have been for over 20 years. You really need to get and x-ray of your chest, culture of your sputum (cough up some sputum in a sterile container so a Med-Tech can analyze it, to determine what bug you have, and what type of antibiotic works best for whatever bug you have. unless it is a virus, and anitbiotics do not work on them.

      Yes you need to see a DR. why be afraid! it is not open heart surgery!!! Questions your Dr. will ask; how long have you felt like this, what color is your sputum, what it taste like (just kdding on that one;-) he will need to know how thick or thin it is, but you stated you cough it up with ease. So that should be no problem. I would encourage to do this especially if you have had this awhile. You will need treatment. Oh, do you smoke? If so, stop while your sick with this. hopefully you can stop for good. But that's other story.
      Good Luck

  43. QUESTION:
    toddler with bad night cough?
    Any suggestions aside from the vaporizer (we have it on high already) to help her night cough? She's 17 months and shows no other signs of sickness, and during the day she rarely coughs at all, only a random quick one that's more like clearing her throat than a cough.

    • ANSWER:
      First, don't use Vicks - it has been shown to increase mucus production (very recent studies). Also, don't use cough medicine - a number of studies have shown that it doesn't work and can cause hallucinations and rapid heart beat in toddlers.

      Second, what kind of cough is it? Is it a junky cough? If so, she might have allergies and the post-nasal drip builds up when she is lying flat, which causes the cough. You might not notice it during the day because if it's only mild, she may not show any obvious symptoms.

      Third, it could be asthma. If this has been going on more than 3 weeks, you may want to consider taking your daughter to the doctor to ask about cough-variant asthma. It's a common type of asthma in toddlers - the only sign is coughing at night.

      Does it sound like she stops breathing, and then chokes and coughs when she finally takes a breath? If so, it could be sleep apnea. In that case, you'll want to take her to the doctor. There are treatments for this.

      Finally, if it doesn't seem to be any of the above, I would ask myself, "Is it keeping her up? Is she still sleeping OK?" If she is sleeping fine, it may just be bothering you more than her, and in that case, I would try to ignore it as much as possible (unless it gets worse or she develops other symptoms).

      I answer from experience because my daughter has had TERRIBLE, heart-wrenching coughing at night. I did a ton of research and in the end we figured out she had allergies with post-nasal drip. Now she is on children's Claritin and the coughing is GONE. When she gets a cold, the cough comes back in a very ugly way at night, but now it only lasts 1-2 nights instead of weeks on end. So you have my sympathy!

  44. QUESTION:
    Always looking fatigued, nostrils clogged?
    For the past like... 2-3 years i've always looked tired(dark circles, eyes sleepy-looking) and it's been on and off throughout the year. Recently i thought about it and i remembered that last year, i looked normal during summer break and for about the first few months of school until around nov. Maybe it's just coincidence but if it is allergies... why would it come during winter?
    Anyways, as for my symptoms... i always look tired (sleeping less makes me look even worse) Even if i sleep good and FEEL really energized, i still look tired. . I cant breath thru both nostrils, only one at a time (the one side i can breath from isn't even fully breathable, still a tiny bit blocked) or when i am able to breath from both nostrils, theyre both 50% blocked on each side. They alternate sides when im sleepin. I dont sneeze or itch anywhere. My eyes do water/burn randomly somedays. No coughing. No post-nasal drip. No clear fluid from my nose. No headaches. Some pressure on the back of head
    PS: ive tried neti pot but it doesnt seem to help that much

    • ANSWER:
      Ask around & do some research to find yourself a really good allergist. Allergists have a really tough job, since the symptoms are as individual as you are. That's why it's really important to find one who keeps up with all the latest news and enjoys a good investigation. They have to be detectives.
      You're describing my teens and twenties, except I also had sinus infections and ear infections with numerous perforations of my eardrums, and lots of headaches. I figured it couldn't be allergies because people with allergies are miserable for seasons, like spring and fall, right? I could be miserable year round or have infections any time.
      My doc did nothing but treat me for the infections, often 6-7 times per year - that's every couple months! He never said a word or suspected allergies (or maybe he just liked the steady income). Just as I began to suspect them and made an appt with an allergist, I ended up in urgent care on New Year's Day. That doc had never seen me before, he took one look in my sinuses and recommended an allergist - said he could tell by the look of the mucus.
      Unfortunately the first allergist was one of the "best" in the area. Ran a regular revolving door of patients without much improvement. He looked at me and saw dollar signs - or braces on his kid's teeth. I was in the process of looking for another doc when I switched to an HMO - had to pick from their allergists. Lucky for me, they employed the best allergist in the world - I'm still with her 20 yrs later.
      She educated me. She also said she would train my body to live with allergies, and she did. I had ALWAYS had dark circles, she said "we call those allergy eyes".
      She found I was drastically allergic to dust - hence my lack of seasonal symptoms but good explanation for that Nov-Dec (I was always sick for Christmas-NewYear's) slide downhill. That's when you turn the furnace on and circulate all the dust.
      I also have numerous allergies to other things, but in much lower sensitivity, explaining why I can be miserable any time of year. I once said to her that I had been sitting outside thinking I had slight alergies to everything except the concrete and she replied "nope, the concrete dust'll get you". Point - the miserable factor is directly related to not only WHAT you are allergic to, but also how deeply allergic you are TO it.
      If you are allergic and begin treatment your response to treatment will depend heavily on how involved you are. The doc can't be sucessful unless you're able to answer their questions. Pay close attention to symptoms, what makes you better, what makes you worse. It may be time of day (body rhythms), it may be position (don'tya just love it when you turn over and the congestion slides to the other side!). It may be heat & cold (I do much better in desert dryness or cold weather). And these are all in addition to finding out what your allergens are.
      I had years of shots. I haven't needed them for years now. I took my medications religiously. If you work hard, together with a good doc you can go a far distance is eliminating the symptoms (not the allergies).
      I'm allergic to dogs (low level) but I owned nine big shaggy ones (Doc feels you tolerate your own because they give you a "shot" each day). I still have symptoms but I'm seldom miserable and I know how to cut them off at the pass.
      Hope this helps.

  45. QUESTION:
    Sinus troubles?
    I have a very bad sinus infection I have been on 4 differant antibotics each one stronger and 3 antibotic shots. I have a cough that I can not git rid of from the post nasal drip I have had this for over 8 weeks I have went to several doctors they did a ct scan lat week and found out that I had 3 polups one in each sinus cavity and on in my nose. I am waiting to get in to a ear, nose, throat dr. I am still waiting to here back. Now my lower teeth are hurting and I have a lump on each side of my jaw bone. My throat is really swollen and hurts. I can hardly swollow. I do not know what to do I am getting worried because all of these lymph nodes are swelling, I know they are fighting infection but they are huge and the Dr. will not call me back. This is the 3rd Dr. They have to refer me to the ENT D.r. or I can not get in to see them for 20 days. Help what should I do? Should I be worried. Is there anthing serious that could happen?

    • ANSWER:
      Topic Overview
      What is sinusitis?
      Sinusitis is infection or inflammation of the lining of the sinus cavities. These are hollow spaces in your cheeks and around your eyes. Sinus infections often follow a cold and cause pain and pressure in your head and face.

      Related Articles
      Sinusitis - Treatment Overview
      Sinusitis - Prevention
      » More overview Articles

      Sinusitis can be either acute (sudden) or chronic (long-term). With chronic sinusitis, the infection does not ever go away completely. You always have some symptoms.

      What causes sinusitis?
      Sinusitis can be caused by three things:

      Viruses.
      Bacteria.
      Fungi.
      The same viruses that cause the common cold cause most cases of sinusitis.

      When the lining of the sinus cavities gets inflamed from a viral infection like a cold, it swells. This is viral sinusitis. The swelling can block the normal drainage of fluid from the sinuses into the nose and throat. If the fluid cannot drain and builds up over time, bacteria or fungi (plural of fungus) may start to grow in it. These bacterial or fungal infections can cause more swelling and pain. They are more likely to last longer, get worse with time, and become chronic.

      Nasal allergies or other problems that block the nasal passages and allow fluid to build up in the sinuses can also lead to sinusitis.

      See a picture of normal facial sinuses and a picture of a blocked sinus.

      What are the symptoms?
      The main symptoms of sinusitis are a runny or stuffy nose and pain and pressure in your head and face. You may also have a yellow or green drainage or drip from your nose or down the back of your throat (postnasal discharge). Where you feel the pain and tenderness depends on which sinus is affected.

      Other common symptoms of sinusitis may include:

      A headache.
      Bad breath.
      A cough that produces mucus.
      A fever.
      Pain in your teeth.
      A reduced sense of taste or smell.
      How is sinusitis diagnosed?
      Your doctor can tell if you have sinusitis by asking questions about your past health and doing a physical exam. You probably won't need any other tests.

      How is it treated?
      Viral sinus infections usually go away on their own within 10 to 14 days. Antibiotics don't work for viral infections. But there are some things you can do at home to help relieve your symptoms:

      Drink plenty of fluids.
      Try over-the-counter pain relievers and decongestant pills to help relieve the pain and pressure in your head and face.
      Put a hot, damp towel or gel pack on your face for 5 to 10 minutes at a time, several times a day.
      Breathe warm, moist air from a steamy shower, a hot bath, or a sink filled with hot water.
      Use saltwater nose drops to help keep the nasal passages open and wash out mucus and bacteria.
      Home treatments may help drain mucus from the sinuses and prevent a more serious bacterial or fungal infection.

      Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics. You will probably feel better in a few days, but some symptoms may last for several weeks. You may need to take the medicine for a longer time if you have chronic sinusitis.

      If you have a fungal infection—which is not common—antibiotics won't clear up your sinusitis. With this type of infection, you may need treatment with antifungal medicines, steroid medicines, or surgery.

      If you have taken antibiotics and other medicines for a long time but still have sinusitis symptoms, you may need surgery. You may also need surgery if the infection is likely to spread or if you have other problems, such as a growth (polyp) blocking the nasal passage.

      Frequently Asked Questions

      Learning about sinusitis:
      What is sinusitis?
      What causes it?
      Can I prevent sinusitis?
      What are the symptoms?
      What happens in sinusitis?
      What increases my risk?
      Who gets sinusitis?

      Being diagnosed:
      Who can diagnose sinusitis?
      How is it diagnosed?

      Getting treatment:
      How is it treated?
      What medicines will I need to take?
      What over–the-counter medicines can I take?
      Should I have surgery for sinusitis?

      Ongoing concerns:
      What problems can sinusitis cause?

      Living with sinusitis:
      What can I do at home to relieve symptoms?

      Author: Amy Fackler, MA
      Debby Golonka, MPH Medical Review: Renée M. Crichlow, MD - Family Medicine
      Martin Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
      Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
      Charles M. Myer, III, MD - Otolaryngology
      Last Updated: 08/22/2006
      © 1995-2007, Healthwise, Incorporated, P.O. Box 1989, Boise, ID 83701. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

      This information is not intended to replace

  46. QUESTION:
    Did this cold/virus hurt my neck permanently?
    I have an upper respiratory infection that i'm feeling a little better from. I had this for 3 days and i am surprised to feel a little better today, fever is gone today, but still spitting up thick green mucus from my post nasal drip. my nose is a little more runny today. it always seems like you feel better when your nose starts running lol. Okay back on topic. For the past 3 days i have been having really bad neck pain and headaches. I go to sleep and i wake up with a stiff neck that hurts so bad and its not going away. Its not the way i sleep because it started when i got this infection. If i turn my neck i feel a sharp pinch in my lymph nodes under my chin area, if i rub my eyes i also feel it in the chin area. My neck hurts so bad it gives me a terrible headache as soon as i wake up from sleeping. I never had this kind of thing before, it only happened with this particular kind of infection. i don't feel as bad today as i felt yesterday, i'm surprised cause i just got it. I am just worried that this infection is doing something to my spine? am i gonna get paralyzed? all i know is that my neck feels so bad every time i wake up in the middle in the night or the morning with this cold i got. the pain makes my forehead throb badly and i don't know what to do. because of this, i can't toss or turn at night easily or it will hurt and it's stiff.

    • ANSWER:
      •Tonsillitis*:

      The main symptom of tonsillitis is a sore throat. More symptoms occur in most cases. Some or all of the following may be present:
      • Fever
      • Bad breath
      • Nasal congestion and runny nose
      • Swollen lymph nodes
      • Red, swollen tonsils covered completely or in patches by pus
      • Difficulty swallowing
      • Headache, ear infections.
      • Abdominal (belly) pain
      • Raw, bleeding patches on the tonsils
      When you have sore throat plus cold symptoms such as nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, and coughing, the cause is most likely a virus. Viral infection of the tonsils usually goes away without treatment within 2 weeks.
      TONSILS:
      Tonsils are like street dogs in Ur vicinity. They are just like security guards for Ur entire body-house.
      When a thief/stranger enters Ur locality to observe the surroundings to commit a crime/theft; the street dog[s] starts barking continuously cautioning U against the dangers ahead.
      Similarly, much before the entry of a serious virus/bacteria into Ur body, the first organs to be affected are tonsils-which are nothing but lymph glands.
      As u r aware that lymphatic system is nothing but a drainage system. If tonsils are removed surgically, it is as good as killing Ur security guards given by the God.
      It is prudent and safe to see a local homoeopath for total cure.

      •OR
      Tonsilitis— Inflammation of the tonsil-a gland at the root of the tongue—Mixture of CF 3x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, FP 12x, KM 3x, KP 3x, MP 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x, NS 3x and S 12x failing which give mixture of CS 3x, KS 3x and S 12x.
      It is often caused by taking too much of ice-solid ice and too much of iced water should be avoided by every body. If it is chronic MP 3x. If tonsils are painful NP 3x. If frothy transparent mucous NM 3x. If the discharge is golden yellow NP 3x.
      About 16 years ago, Sri Pooranchand Sood, Advocate, Agra, was going to get his son's tonsils removed surgically, when the author induced him to defer the operation. In about 3 weeks time this medicine cured the patient: since then he and his son have been recommending this medicine to a number of patients, all of whom have sent very favourable reports.
      Sri H.C. Mukerji, Advocate, Lukerganj Allahabad, gives an
      excellent report about its efficacy in several cases in his family.
      •454. Tonsilitis— (Septic)—Try both the above formulae, failing which mixture of CS 3x, KP 3x, NM 3x, NS 3x and S 12x.

      •Dosage: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      PS:If satisfied, inform others to browse ‘YAHOO ANSWERS’ on any health issue.

  47. QUESTION:
    What is causing my sore throat and how do I get rid of it?
    My throat is super sore and I have no idea why. I woke up the the day before yesterday and my sore throat was really bad. I thought my throat was dry so I drank a lot and i think i took some Tylenol cold. i think it might be post nasal drip because i am sneezing like crazy and I am kind of sniffley. Also, what should i do for it? what would be the best medicines and cough drops to take? anything i can do at home? also, i have to go to school tomorrow so please don't recommend anything i have to do like every 2 hours cuz i can't.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have a runny nose, you have a sore throat because it also drains down the throat. While you are asleep this interferes with your ability to breath and you naturally open your mouth to do it easier. That dries out your throat. The treatment is to get an over the counter medication that will dry up your runny nose. In the meantime, you can ease the throat by simply drinking loads of cold fluids. It doesn't really matter what fluid you drink, except avoid alcohol and dairy. Alcohol just dries you even more, and dairy will coat your throat. It won't hurt you, but it will tend to make things feel thick and gooey, and you'll want to clear your throat. Sleeping in a cooler room, propped up on pillows also helps, and so will adding moisture to the room with a humidifier or vaporizor. Mostly the key is to just drink loads and dry up your nose. Just watch out with the over the counter medications while going to school, as some of those can make you pretty sleepy. You can use any cough drops you like, but hard candy tastes better and works just as well. It's cheaper too. Cough drops mostly work because you produce more saliva and swallow more often, which is why hard candy works as well. If it's really bad, there are anesthetic throat sprays that can temporarily give relief, but they don't work for long. Just dry your nose up, and drink.

  48. QUESTION:
    bad breath !!................................?
    I have tonsil stones, there small, but big smell !!
    They've made my breath really smelly.
    Im 15, why is this happening?
    How can i stop it, do i go to my GP??

    • ANSWER:
      Tonsil stones are irregularly shaped, whitish/yellow, foul-smelling globs of mucus and bacteria that get caught in the back of the throat. They form in the tonsil crypts which are simply small pockets or divots that appear in everyones tonsils. The scientific name for these white globs is tonsilloliths.

      It is only recently that the oral care community has begun to understand what these white spots actually are - many people have reported that their dentist told them that they were just extra food debris, which is not true!

      These tonsillar stones don't do any physical harm, and sporadically coughing them up doesn't mean that there is anything wrong with you. However, they can be annoying (who wants to cough one up while they are kissing someone?), and sometimes they are an indication that you have bad breath.

      If you have ever broken open a tonsil stone, then you know that they smell absolutely terrible! The smell is actually caused by a combination of volatile sulfur compounds(methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide), post nasal drip, and bacteria.

      They will only form in people who still have their tonsils; however, that does not mean that you should run out and get your tonsils removed! Not too long ago, they were routinely removed for being swollen and inflamed. What was not understood then was that the tonsils' sole purpose is to prevent organisms and bacteria from traveling deeper in the throat.

      Tonsilloliths are not something that you have to live with - there are various treatments to get rid of them, without having your tonsils removed (which can be dangerous as people get older).

  49. QUESTION:
    my breath stinks. why though?
    if i eat something my breath will smell like a rotting version of what i ate all day. mints only mix the smell up sometimes making it worse. i brush my teeth twice a day with colgate original and use listerine. my tongue also has this white stuff at the back but it won't come off. i've tried using a spoon but failed.

    what could it be?

    • ANSWER:
      Although I cannot say for certain, the "white stuff" at the back of your tongue may be something called tonsilloliths. These white clusters of calcareous matter form in the crevasses of the tonsils in the rear and occasionally on the roof of the mouth. Dead cells, mucus, food particles, post-nasal-drip mucous, and various other bacteria become trapped in porous areas of the tonsils and eventually calcify to create these horribly odorous stones.

      Tonsilloliths may often cause bad breath and can be difficult to remove on your own because of their position in the mouth. The most effective way to treat this problem would be to visit a dentist who specializes in halitosis treatment.

  50. QUESTION:
    What is hypothyroidism?
    What are some symptoms of it?

    • ANSWER:
      These are possibles: Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.
      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.
      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

post nasal drip and bad breath treatment

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