Why Bad Breath After Adenoidectomy

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How do you know if you may need to get your tonsils removed?
    I have been having really bad throat pains in the past couple days and now I'm at the point where if I talk I feel like I can't breathe. At first I just thought I had a bad sore throat, but now I'm starting to worry. It's hard to drink and/or eat at times. What do you think? Thanks for any and all help!

    • ANSWER:
      You should call your doctor. You may have Strep throat which will need antibiotics and is communicable. Only a doctor can tell you if you need a tonsillectomy and she needs to examine your throat to do that.

      Here's what is said about tonsillectomyies at this web site:
      http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/Tonsillectomy-for-strep-throat

      Tonsillectomy for strep throat
      A tonsillectomy is the surgical removal of the tonsils. The adenoids may or may not be removed at the same time. Adenoidectomy is not discussed in this topic. For more information, see the topic Ear Infections.

      Children whose tonsils are removed for recurrent throat infections may have fewer and less severe strep throat infections for at least 2 years. However, over time, many children who do not have surgery also have fewer throat infections.

      A general anesthetic is always used to sedate a child having a tonsillectomy. Adults may require only a local anesthetic to numb the throat.

      What To Expect After Surgery
      The surgery may be done as outpatient surgery or, occasionally, during an overnight hospital stay.

      A very sore throat usually follows a tonsillectomy and may last for several days. This may affect the sound and volume of the person's voice and his or her ability to eat and drink. The person may also have bad-smelling breath for a few days after surgery. There is a very small risk of bleeding after surgery.

      A child having a tonsillectomy may feel "out of sorts" for a period of a week to 10 days. But if the child is feeling well enough, there is no need to restrict his or her activity or to keep the child at home after the first few days.

      Why It Is Done
      A tonsillectomy may be done in the following cases:1

      A person has recurring episodes of tonsillitis in a single year despite antibiotic treatment.
      Abscesses of the tonsils do not respond to drainage, or an abscess is present in addition to other indications for a tonsillectomy.
      A persistent foul odor or taste in the mouth is caused by tonsillitis and does not respond to antibiotic treatment.
      A biopsy is needed to evaluate a suspected tumor of the tonsil.
      Large tonsils are not a reason to have a tonsillectomy unless they are causing one of the above problems or they are blocking the upper airway, which may cause sleep apnea or problems with eating.

      How Well It Works
      Children whose tonsils are removed for recurrent throat infections may have fewer and less severe strep throat infections for at least 2 years. However, over time, children who do not have their tonsils removed may also have fewer infections.

      Risks
      Normal or expected risks of tonsillectomy include some bleeding after surgery. This is common, especially when the healed scab over the cut area falls off.

      Less common or rare risks include:

      More serious bleeding.
      Anesthetic complications.
      Death after surgery (very rare).
      What To Think About
      When you are trying to decide whether to have the tonsils removed, you might want to think about:

      How much time a child is missing from school because of throat infections.
      How much stress and inconvenience the illness has on the family.
      The risks of surgery must also be weighed against the risks of leaving the tonsils in. In some cases of persistent strep throat infections, especially if there are other complications, surgery may be the best choice.

  2. QUESTION:
    what is good for bad breath after tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      Good brushing habits, of course. Get a tongue brush, or just use your toothbrush (Will diminish quality of brush quicker than getting a special tongue brush) and wash your tongue (As much as you can get).

      Chew on sugarless gum, suck on lozenges, drink plenty of water A moist mouth keeps the bacteria flora at bay.

      I've also heard eat garlic or take garlic supplements to treat bad breath on a more internal level but, then you have to worry about garlic breath.

  3. QUESTION:
    Why does my 5 year old have such bad breath after her tonsillectomy?
    She had a tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy 4 days ago. Granted, I let her get away with not brushing that first day after her surgery, but she's been brushing everyday since. This evening, I decided to help her really scrub up and I noticed her tongue is completely coated and it won't come off with vigorous brushing. She's been on Tylenol with Codine (she was taking 2 tsp every 4 hours around the clock for the first 36 post-op hours and now just when she complains of pain) and one tsp. amoxollin twice a day. She's still mouth breathing and drooling while she sleeps, I guess because everythings still swollen in there. But she's not bleeding or running fever, so I don't think there's an infection that's causing the odor. Anyway, just wanted to see if any other parents have had this issue with their kids.
    Please, no rude or ridiculous answers. Remember that I'm talking about a 5 years old child, and inappropriate comments will be reported.

    • ANSWER:
      if she's taking amoxollin or amoxocillin, it's for an infection...usually. so maybe she just needs time to heal. i'd be worried if it last longer than a couple of weeks. don't have her use mouthwash with alcohol though, that can make bad breath worse. good luck to you.

  4. QUESTION:
    has anyone here had an adenoidectomy? if so, is it normal to have horrible bad breath after a week?
    I can taste it in the back of my throat, and it is disgusting. please help!

    • ANSWER:
      gargle with warm salt water or just warm water it is the result of the dried blood at the back of your nose and is quite normal .drink plenty and suck some tunes or peppermints or chew some gum.

  5. QUESTION:
    Has anyone experienced any problems after having their child's tonsils taken out?
    My daughter had a tonsillectomy & adenoidectomy this past Wed and on Thurs she started to hemmorhage massively. I had to rush her to the hospital where they had to do more surgery to stop the bleeding and she had lost so much blood that she required a blood transfusion. She is home now and is not doing much better, but IS NOT bleeding of course. I was just wondering if any other parents had been through this and how the rest of things went during the recovery period for them? She is 8 years old by the way. Thanks for any answers regarding this very scary ordeal.

    • ANSWER:
      Your daughters experience is not a typical one. Hemorrhaging can occur with ANY type of surgery, but is never the norm. She definitely is not going to feel well. She will experience unusual fatigue for several days, and will lose some weight (a common experience after tonsillectomy). Her breath will smell bad for a week or two following her surgery. This is due to the wounds and healing in her throat where the tonsills and adenoids were removed. Cool liquids will help soothe her throat. Give her pain medication ON TIME whether she is complaining of pain or not. It is always easier to control pain, than try to overcome it once it is a problem. Undoubtedly this was a frightening experience for both of you! Keep a close eye on her and do not hesitate to call your doctor for any questions or concerns.

  6. QUESTION:
    My daughter has bad breath some say it's becoz of sinus infection. She's already had adenoidectomy?
    How can I help her , she's always getting sore throats?

    • ANSWER:
      check her throat, near the tonsils area. If you see any white chunks stuck on there, shes got tonsil stones.
      tonsil stones = horrible breathe.

  7. QUESTION:
    Experiences with your child's adenoidectomy?
    My son might need his adenoids removed due to mouth breathing, can you tell me what to expect? Will he really sound funny when he talks after its done? If so, will he sound funny forever? Please tell me your good and bad experiences.

    • ANSWER:
      I had it done when I was 8. They took my adenoids and tonsils together (they often do). My throat hurt, but there was no difference at all from haing my adenoids out. I sounded the same and could not even tell. I did not talk much at first because of that whole tonsil thing, but even my paretns said the adenoid part was no bid deal. I think it did help me breath better though.....that was quite a while ago.
      good luck to your little guy.......

  8. QUESTION:
    Experiences with adenoidectomy?
    Experiences with adenoidectomy?
    I think my 3 year old might need an adenoidectomy. He hasn't been able to breath through his nose very well sinse he was a little less than a year old. He seems to have sleep apnea because of it and even mouth breaths during the day. I've taken him to his doctor and a ENT specialist and am going soon for a second opinion. I was hoping someone could tell me their or their childrens experiences with the procedure. Did their voice change? Are there any other side effects? Did it help you at all? PLEASE tell me your experiences, I want whats best for my baby.

    • ANSWER:
      My oldest son had his adenoids removed at the same time he had tubes in his ears and surgery for strabismus (the ENT and eye doctor worked together so he only had to go through surgery once).

      Now he was recovering from three procedures, but the recovery for the adenoids were definately the least difficult problem he seemed to have.

      Honestly, the recovery for adenoids was no big deal, and he was able to breathe so much more comfortably after he had the procedure. Since he was able to breathe more easily, his breath got a lot better (constant mouth breathing can cause bad breath), and he slept more soundly.

      You know how they always say children bounce back really quickly? Totally true. After having surgery early in the morning -- three procedures, mind you -- my son was eating chicken, mashed potatoes, green beans, and a roll at Grandy's at an early lunch.

      His voice didn't change, really, except that he did have a little less of the stuffy sound, which is good. He wasn't hoarse immediately after, and it didn't cause any long-term changes, either.

      If all the doctors come to the conclusion that your son needs the surgery, do it. It will help.

      When he has it, they will most likely make certain allowances for him since he's a small child. My son was two years old, and we had him up at an outpatient surgery clinic at about 6:00 AM (they can't eat for several hours before surgery, so the very very early surgery gets you past the "I want breakfast!" issue). He got to wear his own pajama bottoms and wore a child-size hospital gown. He got to have his favorite toy with him for most of the time he was awake. We went into a child-friendly room with books and toys while I answered all the questions they had. After all the questions, they gave him a "pink cocktail" -- a medication to kind of get him to a loopy state. At that point, I had to hold him the whole time, not a big deal, since the pink stuff works quick. Eventually, we put him on the rolling bed (he was allowed to have Baby Tad with him) I kissed him, told him I'd be there when he woke up, and they took him back. I was glad, his eye doctor was a family friend, and he had arranged to be sure he was there while my son was knocked out. They had him pretty knocked out with the pink cocktail and the gas by the time he went back, so he was unaware of getting the iv. After the surgery was over, the doctors spoke with me about how it went, and explained what I would need to know during recovery, then they took me back to the recovery room. It was also set up specifically for children. Now, my son was freaking out by that time, but that had NOTHING to do with the adenoidectomy. He woke up with ointment in his eyes, and he saw blurry shapes and lights, but couldn't see any details, and it scared him. I picked him up and started talking to him, and he calmed down, and after maybe an hour or so, we were able to leave. After that, he was fine.

      The whole situation was frightening for me, and waking up unable to see was frightening for him, but it's SO MUCH better that he did get the surgery when he did. And I want to mention, I live in a pretty small town, and they still had facilities specifically for small children. It's not the 70's anymore, and they do everything they can these days to make it as positive an experience as it can possibly be. If you're worried about that aspect, try to work with your son's doctors and your insurance company to get him to a facility for children.

      Hope this helped. :-)

  9. QUESTION:
    Thick green/yellow mucus following adenoidectomy & tonsillectomy?
    My 2 year old had her tonsils and adenoids removed last Tuesday (we are on day 6 of recovery). She had some congestion following surgery but increased when we got home. It has slowed down but she still sounds kinda snotty and coughs off and on. No fever at all (not even post surgery low-grade)

    Is nasal discharge normal and if so for how long? Also what to expect the remaining week of recovery? When will the bad breath go away - it is noxious. Any answers would be great!

    Also... do not tell me to talk to her doctor. I just want personal experiences from others. I'm not worried about it - just curious.
    To Indiana Jones - She is two years old. The doctor said if she wanted to only eat ice-cream - let her eat whatever she will eat. I would much rather her eat ice-cream than nothing... but that's not even an issue b/c she doesn't like ice-cream... however if that's what she would eat - that is what she would get. Also, her pediatric ENT told us to expect a two week recovery- that is where I'm 'getting that from'. I have never heard (or read) anything about only having or expecting a 10 day recovery.

    • ANSWER:
      I hope she is feeling better after the surgery. My 14 year old daughter had hers out over the summer and she says it was the best decision she have ever made. Yes, she had mucus/coughing/snotty sound, as you were describing, for about 2-3 weeks. From what I guessed, after the surgery the mucus coated the inside of her nose making her sneeze and cough and all the rest of that bad stuff, but I'm not sure. My daughter also had the bad breath. Just make sure she brushes her teeth well, it helped a lot for my daughter. For the rest of the recovery, expect her to be pretty sore. My daughter did not want to move much after, but within the next week she was up and around. The second week was when she started trying to eat other non-liquid foods. However, your daughter is younger so she may be able to jump back much faster. I hope she feels better soon, and if you have any other questions, let me know.

  10. QUESTION:
    I got tonsil stones again how can i get rid of them?
    Im tired of getting these!
    since I can remember, I have been having them since I was around 10 years old.
    I get them about 2-3 times a year. Mostly when the weather temperature changes.
    they fall out within a week or two but I hate them and they are so annoying in my throat and stink
    so bad they give you instant bad breath no matter how much Scope you use

    Also the cold sore I have appears once a year and both the tonsil stones and cold sore appeared at the same time... maybe because of the temperature changes due to it being winter time?

    why do some people get these stones and why do some don't ?
    I'm the only one in my family that gets them why?

    I already tried picking at them with clean fingers and gargling hot water with salt and it does help.
    But i hate waiting until they loosen up by themselves and I spit and cough them out

    any ideas on how to get rid of these stones a faster way ? or how to never have them appear again?
    thanks for reading this to whoever read it.

    • ANSWER:
      most likely you will need to get tonsillectomy / adenoidectomy done....

  11. QUESTION:
    Adenoidectomy?
    My son who is now 3 has been having trouble breathing through his nose since he was 6 mos. old. It's worse in the winter months. I've taken him to several ENT specialists and they still haven't decided whether it's enlarged adenoid or allergies. Do allergies cause enlarged adenoids? He may need an adenoidectomy, what are your experiences with them? Did you or someone you know talk funny because of it? Please, tell me your experiences.

    • ANSWER:
      Our daughter who is now 13 had hers' taken out when she was 3.
      They were enlarged and were causing her to wake up many times during the night and also snore.

      We were told that by 3 her adenoids were no longer needed.
      The procedure was quick (under an hour, home the same day) with no visible signs of surgery since they go through the mouth.

      She recovered fast and doesn't remember having them out.
      After they were removed she slept much better.....

      The Dr. told us that she would possibly have to have them removed again, as they sometimes regrow.

      Until now we have not taken her in but we can tell by her sleep pattern that they have probably regrown.

      As a side point they sometimes cause bad breath, our daughter was told that using saline in the nasal passage once a day would help kill the bacteria on the adenoids that cause the bad breath. So if your son has chronic bad breath it may be adenoids.

      Hope this is helpful for you.

  12. QUESTION:
    sighs of deseased adniods?
    signs and symtoms of bad adnoids

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms:-
      * Mouth breathing (mostly at night)
      * Dry mouth
      * Cracked lips
      * Mouth open during day (more severe obstruction)
      * Bad breath
      * Persistent runny nose or nasal congestion
      * Frequent ear infections
      * Snoring
      * Restlessness while sleeping
      * Intermittent sleep apnea.
      (MedlinePlus)
      Adenoidectomy is the surgical removal of the adenoids. They may be removed for several reasons, including impaired breathing through the nose and chronic infections or earaches. The surgery is common. It is most often done on an outpatient basis under general anethesia. Post-operative pain is generally minimal and mitigated with an abundance of icy or cold foods (eg. Popsicles). Recovery time is 2 to 3 days.(Wikipedia)
      Please see the web pages for more details on Adenoid hypertrophy and Adenoid removal (Adenoidectomy).

  13. QUESTION:
    Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy problems...?
    Just got my tonsils and adenoids out yesterday. At first, I couldn't blow my nose or sniffle. Today, I can blow my nose but it hurts and blood comes out. Swallowing became less painful this morning but after I blew my nose a little this afternoon the pain has increased. Is the blood coming out with strangely colored mucus normal? Also, my breath smells really bad :( When will this go away? Any ways to quicken recovery?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. It is compleltly normal sweetie. Hang in there. :) I threw up a shit load of blood when I had my addnoise out. The doctor said it was more then normal. You will be jusy fine, and recovry.. Don't talk and eat ice cream and in 3 weeks you should he better. 2 months perfect! :) swallowing will be tuff. I know, it's a kick in the butt. If you really cannot swallow you must go to your doctor and see if they can inject fluids in you. Getting dehydration would just make you even more miserable then you'd be back in the hosptial and tons of needles. Hope all is well dear. :)

  14. QUESTION:
    Tonsillectomy, Adenoidectomy and a Septoplasty?
    I'm getting all three of these done in about 8 hours here. And I really have a few questions about what to expect and what not.

    First off, I'm getting my tonsils and adenoids out and then the ENT is correcting my deviated septum. I''m doing this becuase of cronic sinus infections, having large tonsels and large adenoids which partially block the airway to my nose.

    So, right now, I'm a mouth breather, I hardly every breath out of my nose and I can't really keep breathing out of my nose because I can't inhale fast enough. Besides that, I snore, loud. I've been told my snoring might be affected too, I;m hoping. Finally my voice sometimes is nasally depending on my sinuses, so yeh.

    I'm asking if I can expect:
    - no snoring
    - more sauve voice

    I'd also like to know if anything else might change, like sleep patterns, athletics, ect.

    THANKS A MILLION

    • ANSWER:
      I asked before my operation and was told that my voice would change in pitch. It's now actually higher. I would expect the snoring to go away or at least not be so bad and your voice would be a little higher in pitch.

  15. QUESTION:
    PostOp Tonsil-Adenoidectomy Questions? Answer ASAP?
    Today is March 12th, 2012 and it is the 4th day after my surgery, which was early in the morning on March 9th. I am 16 years old and this was my first surgery of any kind. I've done a lot of research so I know the basics of the procedure and recovery and all of that good stuff but I'm just double checking!

    ----

    Am I not supposed to cough or clear my throat? Because I have been, I can't help it. Yellow/dark green flem with what looks like little clumps are coming out of my throat after I cough it up. And I'm not talking just a little mucus here and there, I mean no matter how much I do this HUGE globs of this stuff is just coming from my body. Is it the scabs or what? I have no idea.
    And NO I haven't been bleeding in any way.

    I take 3 teaspoons of Liquid Lortab every 4-6 hours. It makes me so sleepy. I've fallen asleep on my toilet atleast twice a day since my surgery! I can't stay awake for anything. Is that normal?

    Why are my sockets completely white on the inside of my mouth? Are those the scabs? If not, is it gonna look like that forever or will my mouth go back to looking like it used to, just without my tonsils?

    Is a vaporizer a good idea? We have a vaporizer, but not a humidifier.

    When will drinking liquids be more tolerable? It still hurts so bad for me to take a tiny sip of anything!

    Why is my mouth SO FULL of spit? Goo-ey spit! It's gross and I find myself needing to swallow more often than usual and it's annoying because it hurts so bad.

    And if there is any other advice you'd like to throw in, please do! Any answers will help!

    Thanks in advance! Lindy

    • ANSWER:
      Most, if not all your problems were, and are, caused by tight neck muscles. When the muscles are tight they press into the throat with enough pressure to trap your tongue muscle to make it hard and painful to swallow. When the muscles are tight they restrict the blood flow leaving the head so the first place that it backs up into is your tonsils, they become swollen. When your neck muscles are tight they are pressing onto your gag reflex area which is causing a lot of the coughing to happen. When the blood is restricted leaving your head it's also letting less fresh blood into your head so the brain is getting less fresh blood to result in a lowered oxygen level in it. There are three stages of lowered oxygen levels in the brain and they are; feeling very tired; getting dizzy or light headed; and passing out. To get rid of these problems you have to free up your neck muscles to get the pressure off your throat and to return the blood flow back to normal and here's how to free them up:
      Neck Release:
      Place your hands behind your head touching your fingers. Press into the back of your neck with them and hold the pressure on them. After 45 seconds slowly lower your head until your neck is fully extended. Release the pressure but hold your head there for another 30 seconds.
      For best results relax your body first by taking a deep breath and exhaling then remain this relaxed.

  16. QUESTION:
    Honestly,what all happens in a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy?
    Okay,so in a week im getting my tonsils aNd adenoids removed Im 14 and ive never had surgery,im a little nervous.the part that im scared of is the IV and the recovery.how bad is the pain of the iv and what happens when u wake up?how will they give me the anesthesia? Will they show u the tonsills? Please help and tell me everything you know
    Thank you gia:)! I play soccer and competitive cheer,how long will i be out of this activity
    Thanks you everyone for ur help and info i feel a little better:)!

    • ANSWER:
      i'm 24 and i've had 9 surgeries including a tonsillectomy last september.

      i'll try to give you a run down of what usually goes on from the time you get there to the time you leave as well as the recovery.

      first you'll probably be told not to eat or drink anything effective at midnight the night before surgery.

      you'll go to the hospital and go to the admission desk. they'll put some info into the computer and put a wrist band on.
      then you go up to what ever floor they tell you to and the nurse will put you in a room, ask you a bunch of questions, take your blood pressure and temp, and maybe ask for a urine sample. then they'll give you a gown and tell you to hang out on the bed until they come get you. you'll then be wheeled on a cart down to the preoperative area. depending on your age they may ask your parents to go to the waiting room or they may let them come to the preoperative area with you.
      down in pre-op they will ask you a bunch of the same questions that you were already asked just so they can be sure everything was written correctly. they'll take your BP again (they will put a cuff on that does it automatically every few minutes and this will stay on for the entire surgery and while you are in the recovery room), take your temp again, and also put a pulse ox monitor on your finger. it just measures how much oxygen you have in your body so they can regulate it(this will also stay on during surgery and in the recovery room) it doesn't hurt or anything. and they'll start an IV in the back of your hand or in the bend of your arm. the dr doing the surgery will usually appear to ask if you have any last minute questions and run through exactly what he is doing again. then if you are extremely nervous they may give you something in the IV to calm you down. it will most likely give you a burning sensation in your arm for a minute but it goes away quickly. it may make you feel tired, looopy, or just chilled out depending on what drug they used.
      then they will wheel you into the operating room and help you scoot over onto the operating table. they'll then put an oxygen mask on your face and heart monitor patches on your chest. then they will either give you the anesthesia through the mask or through the IV. if its through the mask you will just breath it in. it smells like nail polish remover. you may feel like you can't breath cuz the smell is sooo strong but with in a minute you are out like a light. if its given through the IV you will have a burning sensation in your arm for a frew seconds and then you may start to feel dizzy or sick but before you can even tell someone you don't feel good you are out like a light.

      when you wake up you may feel like you just closed your eyes and then opened them again. you may not even realize for a second that the surgery even started let alone it being done already.
      you'll almost certainly feel really tired. you may also experience uncontrolable shaking, being emotional and crying cuz you don't know whats going on, feeling dizzy and possibly fainting, and/or feeling sick and possibly throwing up. these are all common side effects after anesthesia.

      you will start out in the recovery room where there are nurses and other patients coming out of anesthesia. they will monitor you and bug you every few minutes to make sure you are alright. they don't really expect you to full wake up in this room. once you are stable you will be wheeled back up to the room you started in when you got there and that is where your parents can see you again. at this point a nurse will come in and really start to try to get you to wake up. they'll try to get you to drink something like apple juice or 7up. they also try to get you to go use the bathroom.
      they usually try to get you up and out as quickly as they can so they can make more room for other patients.
      if you don't feel like you can get up and go then don't let them rush you. its best to go at your own pace this will lessen the chance of you getting extremely sick or dizzy.

      one little thing that i always try to let people know is if you get the least bit chilly ask for a blanket. they have a "warming oven" so when they give you a blanket it is nice and warm. if you are still cold ask for another one and another until you feel comfortable cuz when you get cold you get more shaky and in my opinion then get more nervious.
      oh and if you are prone to cold feet wear a pair of regular socks and then also a pair of those soft fuzzy socks and it will keep your feet toasty.

      the recovery process takes about 10 days.

      you will most likely be taking liquid lortab (which tastes nasty) and liquid amoxicillin (the yummy bubble gum med that you most likely took at some point in your childhood)

      take the pain killers when ever you can. even if your pain isn't all that bad cuz if you skip doses the pin will come back to haunt you. and you may think there isn't enough medicine to last the whole recovery but don't worry cuz they usually allow for one refill which will give you more than enough.

      as much as it may hurt make sure you have lots to drink cuz that will actually lessen the pain and recovery time in the long run.
      when you sleep make sure you set an alarm for at least every 2hrs to have a drink cuz your throat will get extremely dry especially cuz your mouth will most likely be open while sleeping.

      i'll break down my pain levels day by day to give you an idea of what your recovery may be like. i'll give it to you on a scale of 1-10
      day 1 and 2 (2-10)
      day 3 (4-10)
      day 4, 5, 6, 7 (8-10)
      day 8 and 9 (4-10)
      day 10 (2-10)
      by day 12 i was pretty much back to normal.

      the reason the pain will not be too bad and then will rise is cuz as the scabs are forming and your throat is healing it makes it hurt more.
      once the scabs start falling off the pain starts going away again.

      you'll get a nasty taste in your mouth DO NOT TRY TO DO ANYTHING ABOUT IT. its due to the scabs forming. you do not want to try to get rid of the scabs before they come off on their own. if you try to brush back there or use mouth wash the scabs may come off before they are ready and you would start bleeding which can be life threatening and you would need to go to the ER.

      the scabs usually come off between 8-12 days after the surgery. you'll sudenly feel the need to cough and after a few good coughs you'll spit out a piece of scab. for me the nasty taste in my mouth suddenly shot through my nose. i actually thought the scab was gonna come out of my nose (of course it didn't but it was weird how the taste become an extreme smell in my nose as i coughed the scabs out).

      you cannot use ibuprofen for 3 weeks prior to the surgery and you cannot start back up using it until 3 weeks after the surgery. ibuprofen can thin blood which would put you at a much higher risk of bleeding.

      you also cannot use a straw until 3 weeks after the surgery.

      as far as food goes you are not supposed to have any dairy. i know so many people say "you can eat all the ice cream you want" but thats not true. back in the day drs used to recommend ice cream cuz its soft and cold but they do not recommend it any more cuz dairy creates a lot of mucous which will cause a lot of congestion and you'll have to cough hard to try to get in out and coughing will highly irritate your throat. plus the congestion causes you to loose your voice.
      (i did not have any dairy during my recovery and i could talk just fine and i was not congested at all)

      things to drink are:
      -tons of cold water
      -apple juice
      -passion fruit juice
      -peach juice
      -gatoraid
      for the first 3 days the only things you are supposed to "eat" are things like jello, popsicles, and soup broth. (thats why you need to have a wide variety of drinks so you don't get extremely bored with your diet)
      after the first 3 days you can start eating things like:
      -mashed potatoes
      -mac n cheese
      -soup
      -oatmeal
      -apple sauce
      -peas
      -baked beans. (my ENT was in shock when i said i loved eating baked beans during my recovery but that was cuz he usually deals with little kids like under 10yrs old and knows many kids don't like them lol)

      you'll go for a 10 day check up. the dr will just look at your throat they won't poke around or anything so don't worry about that happening. as long as they say you look good you'll be able to go back to a pretty much normal diet. they suggest still eating fairly soft foods. (i had a mcdonalds cheeseburger when i left the appointment).
      you just cannot eat chips or pretzels for 3 weeks after the sugery cuz they are rough.

      also you cannot exercise for about 3 weeks afer surgery as well cuz they don't want you to strain anything.

      you do still have a risk of bleeding for 4-6 weeks after the surgery so you souldn't make any plans that require you to leave the area.

  17. QUESTION:
    What should I expect from a tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy?
    I'm 23 will be 24 by the time I get them taken out. I'm just looking for honest answers about a few questions I have.

    1. How old were you when you had your tonsils and/or adenoids taken out?

    2. How long did it take you to recover completely?

    3. What was your experience like? Was it as terrible as everyone says it is when you aren't a kid?

    4. What is the best advice you can give me about aftercare so it's goes more smoothly?

    I appreciate any and all input. I know this is a major surgery and everyone says it's much worse the older you are. :( Thank you in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      i'm 23 and i've had 9 surgeries including a tonsillectomy in september so i pretty much know the drill.

      i'll try to give you a run down of what usually goes on from the time you get there to the time you leave as well as the recovery process.

      first you'll probably be told not to eat or drink anything effective at midnight the night before surgery.

      you'll go to the hospital and go to the admission desk. they'll put some info into the computer and put a wrist band on.
      then you go up to what ever floor they tell you to and the nurse will put you in a room, ask you a bunch of questions, take your blood pressure and temp, and maybe ask for a urine sample. then they'll give you a gown and tell you to hang out on the bed until they come get you. you'll then be wheeled on a cart down to the preoperative area. they may ask your parents to go to the waiting room or they may let them come to the preoperative area with you.
      down in pre-op they will ask you a bunch of the same questions that you were already asked just so they can be sure everything was written correctly. they'll take your BP again (they will put a cuff on that does it automatically every few minutes and this will stay on for the entire surgery and while you are in the recovery room), take your temp again, and also put a pulse ox monitor on your finger. it just measures how much oxygen you have in your body so they can regulate it(this will also stay on during surgery and in the recovery room) it doesn't hurt or anything. and they'll start an IV in the back of your hand or in the bend of your arm. the dr doing the surgery will usually appear to ask if you have any last minute questions and run through exactly what he is doing again. then if you are extremely nervous they may give you something in the IV to calm you down. it will most likely give you a burning sensation in your arm for a minute but it goes away quickly. it may make you feel tired, looopy, or just chilled out depending on what drug they used.
      then they will wheel you into the operating room and help you scoot over onto the operating table. they'll then put an oxygen mask on your face and heart monitor patches on your chest. then they will either give you the anesthesia through the mask or through the IV. if its through the mask you will just breath it in. it smells like nail polish remover. you may feel like you can't breath cuz the smell is sooo strong but with in a minute you are out like a light. if its given through the IV you will have a burning sensation in your arm for a frew seconds and then you may start to feel dizzy or sick but before you can even tell someone you don't feel good you are out like a light.

      when you wake up you may feel like you just closed your eyes and then opened them again. you may not even realize for a second that the surgery even started let alone it being done already.
      you'll almost certainly feel really tired. you may also experience uncontrolable shaking, being emotional and crying cuz you don't know whats going on, feeling dizzy and possibly fainting, and/or feeling sick and possibly throwing up. these are all common side effects after anesthesia.

      you will start out in the recovery room where there are nurses and other patients coming out of anesthesia. they will monitor you and bug you every few minutes to make sure you are alright. they don't really expect you to full wake up in this room. once you are stable you will be wheeled back up to the room you started in when you got there and that is where your parents can see you again. at this point a nurse will come in and really start to try to get you to wake up. they'll try to get you to drink something like apple juice or 7up. they also try to get you to go use the bathroom.
      they usually try to get you up and out as quickly as they can so they can make more room for other patients.
      if you don't feel like you can get up and go then don't let them rush you. its best to go at your own pace this will lessen the chance of you getting extremely sick or dizzy.

      one little thing that i always try to let people know is if you get the least bit chilly ask for a blanket. they have a "warming oven" so when they give you a blanket it is nice and warm. if you are still cold ask for another one and another until you feel comfortable cuz when you get cold you get more shaky and in my opinion then get more nervious.
      oh and if you are prone to cold feet wear a pair of regular socks and then also a pair of those soft fuzzy socks and it will keep your feet toasty.

      the recovery process takes about 10 days.

      you will most likely be taking liquid lortab (which tastes nasty) and liquid amoxicillin (the yummy bubble gum med that you most likely took at some point in your childhood)

      take the pain killers when ever you can. even if your pain isn't all that bad cuz if you skip doses the pin will come back to haunt you. and you may think there isn't enough medicine to last the whole recovery but don't worry cuz they usually allow for one refill which will give you more than enough.

      as much as it may hurt make sure you have lots to drink cuz that will actually lessen the pain and recovery time in the long run.
      when you sleep make sure you set an alarm for at least every 2hrs to have a drink cuz your throat will get extremely dry especially cuz your mouth will most likely be open while sleeping.

      i'll break down my pain levels day by day to give you an idea of what your recovery may be like. i'll give it to you on a scale of 1-10
      day 1 and 2 (2-10)
      day 3 (4-10)
      day 4, 5, 6, 7 (8-10)
      day 8 and 9 (4-10)
      day 10 (2-10)
      by day 12 i was pretty much back to normal.

      the reason the pain will not be too bad and then will rise is cuz as the scabs are forming and your throat is healing it makes it hurt more.
      once the scabs start falling off the pain starts going away again.

      you'll get a nasty taste in your mouth DO NOT TRY TO DO ANYTHING ABOUT IT. its due to the scabs forming. you do not want to try to get rid of the scabs before they come off on their own. if you try to brush back there or use mouth wash the scabs may come off before they are ready and you would start bleeding which can be life threatening and you would need to go to the ER.

      the scabs usually come off between 8-12 days after the surgery. you'll sudenly feel the need to cough and after a few good coughs you'll spit out a piece of scab. for me the nasty taste in my mouth suddenly shot through my nose. i actually thought the scab was gonna come out of my nose (of course it didn't but it was weird how the taste become an extreme smell in my nose as i coughed the scabs out).

      you cannot use ibuprofen for 3 weeks prior to the surgery and you cannot start back up using it until 3 weeks after the surgery. ibuprofen can thin blood which would put you at a much higher risk of bleeding.

      you also cannot use a straw until 3 weeks after the surgery.

      as far as food goes you are not supposed to have any dairy. i know so many people say "you can eat all the ice cream you want" but thats not true. back in the day drs used to recommend ice cream cuz its soft and cold but they do not recommend it any more cuz dairy creates a lot of mucous which will cause a lot of congestion and you'll have to cough hard to try to get in out and coughing will highly irritate your throat. plus the congestion causes you to loose your voice.
      (i did not have any dairy during my recovery and i could talk just fine and i was not congested at all)

      things to drink are:
      -tons of cold water
      -apple juice
      -passion fruit juice
      -peach juice
      -gatoraid
      for the first 3 days the only things you are supposed to "eat" are things like jello, popsicles, and soup broth. (thats why you need to have a wide variety of drinks so you don't get extremely bored with your diet)
      after the first 3 days you can start eating things like:
      -mashed potatoes
      -mac n cheese
      -soup
      -oatmeal
      -apple sauce
      -peas
      -baked beans. (my ENT was in shock when i said i loved eating baked beans during my recovery but that was cuz he usually deals with little kids like under 10yrs old and knows many kids don't like them lol)

      you'll go for a 10 day check up. the dr will just look at your throat they won't poke around or anything so don't worry about that happening. as long as they say you look good you'll be able to go back to a pretty much normal diet. they suggest still eating fairly soft foods. (i had a mcdonalds cheeseburger when i left the appointment).
      you just cannot eat chips or pretzels for 3 weeks after the sugery cuz they are rough.

      also you cannot exercise for about 3 weeks afer surgery as well cuz they don't want you to strain anything.

      you do still have a risk of bleeding for 4-6 weeks after the surgery so you souldn't make any plans that require you to leave the area.

  18. QUESTION:
    questions about adenoids?
    iam a 21 years old guy...plzz answer all my questions about adenoids:

    1) i have enlarged adenoids blocking my smelling and breathing path...i can hardly smell and breath through my nose and also i keep sneezing like an allergy...can enlarged adenoids cause nose allergy??

    2) my tonsils were removed when i was small...if i remove the adenoids now then i will have no tonsils and no adenoids so...are respiratory infections gonna be easier to get to me?

    3) am i gonna feel pain in my nose after i remove my adenoids now in this age?? how painful is it?

    4) i was born with cystic hygroma on the neck and did many operations as a baby and i even had a tracheastomy because the tumor effected my respiratory system but now iam fine and the tracheastomy is closed but...is it possible that my adenoids became enlarged and caused me a problem because of cystic hygroma?

    plz answer my 4 questions

    • ANSWER:
      1) Enlarged adenoids don't cause upper respiratory problems, quite the opposite. Infection and inflammation cause your adenoids to enlarge because, like tonsils, adenoids are a kind of lymph node that filter and kill microorganisms.
      2) Multiple studies have shown that patients have no increased problems with respiratory infections after tonsil/adenoid removal. Again, quite the opposite (as chronically infected adenoids lead to chronic respiratory infection).
      3) Pain and bleeding are common side effects of the surgery, although I honestly don't know whether it'll be better or worse than if you were a kid. Adenoidectomy is a very simple 10-minute procedure though, so side effects are generally mild and short-lived.
      4) I did a medline search on cystic hygroma + adenoids and came up with nothing, which confirmed what I was thinking that it's highly unlikely the two are related.

      I do encourage you to talk to your otolaryngologist about your concerns prior to consenting for the procedure, but in the meantime I hope some of this helps.

  19. QUESTION:
    why should the tonsils me remove? and what are the consequences?

    • ANSWER:
      A tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure in which the tonsils are removed. Sometimes the adenoids are removed at the same time.

      Tonsillectomy may be indicated when the patient:

      Experiences frequent bouts of acute tonsillitis. The number indicating tonsillectomy varies with the severity of the episodes. One case, even severe, is generally not enough for most surgeons to decide tonsillectomy is indicated.
      Has chronic tonsillitis, consisting of persistent, moderate-to-severe throat pain.
      Has multiple bouts of peritonsillar abscess.
      Has sleep apnea (stopping or obstructing breathing at night due to enlarged tonsils or adenoids)
      Difficulty eating or swallowing due to enlarged tonsils
      Is suspected of having cancer.
      Most infections indicating tonsillectomy are a result of Streptococcus infection ("strep throat"), but some may be due to other bacilli, such as Staphylococcus, or viruses. However, the etiology of the condition is largely irrelevant in determining whether tonsillectomy is indicated. [1]

      Most tonsillectomies are performed on children, though many are also performed on teenagers and adults. There has been a significant reduction in the number of tonsillectomies in the United States from several millions in the 1970s to approximately 600,000 in the late 1990s. This has been due in part to more stringent guidelines for tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (see tonsillitis and adenoid). Still, debate about the usefulness of tonsillectomies continues. Not surprisingly, the otolaryngology literature is usually pro-tonsillectomy and the pediatrician literature is the opposing view.[citation needed] Enlarged tonsils are being removed more often among adults and children for sleep apnea (airway obstruction while sleeping), snoring, and upper airway obstruction. Children who have sleep apnea can do poorly in school, are tired and fatigued during the day, and have some links to ADHD. [2][3]

      Tonsillectomy in adults is perhaps more painful than in children, though everyone's experience is different. Post-operative recovery may take 10-20 days, during which narcotic analgesics are typically prescribed. A diet of soft food (e.g. pudding, eggs, soft noodles, soup, etc.) is recommended to minimize pain and the risk of bleeding; the duration of diet restriction varies from patient to patient and may last from several days to two weeks or more. Proper hydration is also very important during this time, since dehydration can increase throat pain, leading to a vicious cycle of poor fluid intake. At some point, most commonly 7-11 days after the surgery (but occasionally as long as two weeks after), bleeding may occur when scabs begin sloughing off from the surgical sites. The overall risk of bleeding is approximately 1-2% higher in adults. [4] Approximately 10% of adult patients develop significant bleeding at this time. The bleeding may quickly stop naturally, or via mild intervention (e.g. gargling cold water). Otherwise, a surgeon must repair the bleeding immediately by cauterization, which presents all the risks associated with emergency surgery (most having to do with the administration of anesthesia on a patient whose stomach is not empty). There are several different procedures available to remove tonsils, each with different advantages and disadvantages. In children and teenagers it may be the case that there is a noticeable change in voice [5] after the operation

      Ear pain: Many children will complain of ear aches after tonsillectomy. This is caused by pain coming from throat and not the ears. Give pain medications and encourage liquid intake.
      Fever: Many patients have a low-grade fever after tonsillectomy - up to 101.5 degrees (380 C.). Give Tylenol and plenty of fluids. Higher prolonged fever should be reported to your surgeon.
      Bad looking (and bad smelling) throat: Most tonsillar areas (after surgery) are covered with a white exudate - sometimes with bad breath - for up to 12 days. There be some redness and swelling as well. The uvula (the thing hanging down in the middle) is occasionally swollen.

  20. QUESTION:
    My 19 month old needs adnoids removed..?
    She will get them removed next week.how long is the surgery? and has anyone experianced this with their young children under age two?

    • ANSWER:
      The procedure itself usually takes 20 to 30 minutes. Your doctor will talk to you as soon as the surgery is over.

      Your child will wake up in the recovery room after surgery. This may take 45 minutes to an hour. When your child is awake, he or she will be taken to the Short Stay post operative area to complete the recovery. You can be with your child once he or she has been transferred to this area.

      Children usually go home the same day after surgery, but in some cases your doctor may recommend keeping your child in the hospital overnight (e.g., your child is under age 4 and had his or her tonsils removed). If your child does stay overnight, one parent is required to stay overnight too.

      An upset stomach and vomiting (throwing up) are common for the first 24 hours after surgery.

      If just the adenoid is removed (not the tonsils too) your child’s throat will be mildly sore for a day or two after surgery. Most children are able to eat and drink normally within a few hours after surgery, even if their throat hurts a little. It is very important that your child drink plenty of fluids after surgery. If your child complains of neck pain, throat pain, or difficulty swallowing you can give your child plain Tylenol® (acetaminophen). Prescription pain medications are not necessary.

      Your doctor will likely prescribe an antibiotic for 5 to 10 days after surgery. This helps keep nasal bacteria under control during the healing process.

      Your child may have a fever for 3-4 days after surgery. This is normal and is not cause for alarm.

      Neck soreness, bad breath, and snoring are also common after surgery. These symptoms will also go away during the first 3 weeks after surgery.

      How should I take care of my child after surgery?
      It is important to encourage your child to drink plenty of liquids. Keeping the throat moist decreases discomfort and prevents dehydration (a dangerous condition in which the body does not have enough water). There are no specific dietary restrictions after adenoidectomy. In other words, your child can eat whatever you would normally feed him or her.

      In most cases, your child may return to his or her regular activities within 1 or 2 days after surgery. There is no need to restrict normal activity after your child feels back to normal. Vigorous exercise (such as swimming and running) should be avoided for 1 week after surgery.

      Do not give your child any pain medicines that your doctor has not prescribed or recommended. Medicines like aspirin, ibuprofen (Children’s Motrin®), and many others will increase the risk of severe bleeding for 2 weeks after surgery. Tylenol® (acetaminophen) is safe to use. If you are not sure what medicines are safe, please call your doctor.

      What else do I need to know?
      Upset stomach and vomiting are common during the first 24 to 48 hours after surgery. If vomiting continues for more than 1 or 2 days after surgery, call our office.

      Signs of dehydration include sunken eyes, dry and sticky lips, no urine for over 8 hours, and no tears. If your child has these signs you should call our office.

      Streaks of blood seen if your child sneezes or blows the nose are common during the first few hours and should be no cause for alarm.

      Severe bleeding is rare after adenoidectomy. If your child coughs up, throws up, or spits out bright red blood or blood clots you should bring him or her to the emergency room at Minneapolis Children’s Hospital immediately. Although rare, this type of bleeding can occur up to 2 weeks after surgery.

why bad breath after adenoidectomy

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